Linux Blog

TheLinuxBlog.com Wrote a Post. You wont believe what happens next.

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:08 pm on Monday, September 8, 2014

It happened, I finally got around to writing a post. Ever since the demise of Google Reader it has been sort of a downward spiral for this blog, my last post almost a year ago. From being number 1 in the search engines for “Linux Blog” to somewhere down on page who knows where and what desperate folks click those links?

I’ve not lost interest in Linux (I’ve used it every day since before the conception of this blog), or writing in general, but perhaps I’ve lost interest or have a lack of time for writing about Linux. There isn’t much to write about that hasn’t already been covered or can’t be for lack of a better term (and because no one uses Bing) “Googled.” I’d ask, what do people want to read about, but I could probably google that, or write about what I think people want to hear about, but that would just be regurgitating content for the sake of it.

This blogs not dead, I’m just going to shift topics a bit and write about what interests me about Linux and tech in general, projects I’m working on or problems encountered and see where that takes it. If I take it back to the beginning and make it fun again perhaps I’ll write more.

Until next time:
“Sorry no catchy closing here”

off to delete the accumulated comment spam now.

xrandr – Set Primary Monitor

Filed under: Linux Hardware,Linux Software,Shell Script Sundays — Owen at 11:04 pm on Sunday, October 27, 2013

I had an issue with my dual monitor setup where my primary monitor was my second, but only in X. Rearranging the monitors in Gnome preferences did nothing to solve the problem. While not exactly a shell script, here is a one-liner to change your primary monitor with xrandr.

#!/bin/bash
xrandr --output DVI-0 --primary

The above uses xrandr to set the primary to DVI-0. I put this in my ~/bin folder, chmod’d and set it to start when Gnome starts. Problem solved!

Raspberry Pi – Awesome!

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:17 pm on Thursday, October 24, 2013

Raspberry Pi

I never jumped on the Pi bandwagon, sure I thought it was cool but when I wanted one, there were supply demands and the want wore off. I recently purchased a Model B revision Two and have to say I’m very impressed. It is an awesome piece of hardware but what really makes the Raspberry Pi great is the community that has been built around them. There are many projects and tutorials based and plenty of hackers working on tweaking and expanding them. Here are a few of my favorite projects, incase you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of years like me:
(Read on …)

Login Script to Phone Home

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:59 pm on Monday, October 7, 2013

If you’re a little paranoid like me, you often wonder what will happen if your laptop gets stolen. I’ve seen news articles and the like where an thief happened to steal a laptop and got caught because they stole the wrong persons laptop.


Today we have a one liner that will phone home when a user logs in. While this wont work if you have a password on your laptop, which is recommended, if you keep a dummy account called “User” or “Guest” with no password and the thief happens to log in, you could be in luck.

#!/bin/bash 
ssh -N -R2222:localhost:22 <user>@<yourhost> -p<port> -i /home/<user>/.ssh/id_rsa

The simple SSH command opens up a remote port 2222 to the local port 22 which of course requires SSH to be running locally. It also uses the ssh identity file, for ano password ssh login, and the -N is for no shell. Set it up as an application that starts on login and if that account is set to auto connect to WiFi, it will connect as the user logs in. If you wanted to take it a step further you could combine it with autossh to continue trying to connect. It will also help if you have a static IP or DNS setup so that it will be able to connect if your device unfortunately goes missing.

Logitech 1100 Review

Filed under: Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 pm on Monday, September 9, 2013

Logitech 1100So, for my birthday two years ago, I got a Logitech 1100 universal remote. I figured having recently having a birthday it was a good time to review the unit since I’ve been using it for a while. Besides, the last post about the Macbook has been on the blog for FAR too long.

I wanted a remote that could control all my devices, add new devices at will and was easy to use. At first, my opinion was that this device is awesome, and thought of all the endless possibilities. In reality I haven’t got to use the device for all the cool stuff I imagined, but it does do a rather good job at what it was designed to do and what I set it up to do. The device its self is a touch screen (not the new multi-touch ones we’re used to) and has a few buttons. You set up activities through the software, select them from the touch screen where it then turns on the devices in the sequence you wish and gives you a touch remote and assigns the 8 physical buttons to whatever device you choose.
(Read on …)

I got a Mac

Filed under: Linux Hardware,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:05 am on Tuesday, July 9, 2013

I’m not really a huge consumer of hardware, but I today I got a Mac, more specifically a MacBook Air. It is my first brand new computer since I built my desktop which I probably never wrote about. I didn’t pay for it, as it was promotional item from training I signed up for. I had a choice of a Toshiba Ultrabook that never really closes, or the MacBook Air. After I thought about it, the choice was not too hard, I choose the one that would have the higher re-sale value, the better of the two OS’s, and probably better Linux support.

So far I’m impressed, it is a very elegant design, the internal hardware is meh but it does have a SSD which is the first I’ve owned. It would be nice to try and hook up an external monitor, but I’m not sinking any money into it, because I don’t really want to pay the standard $79 apple accessory fee, and am not sure if the thunderbolt port even converts to HDMI, and I’m sure as hell not going to buy a thunderbolt display. There is only two USB ports, which is rather pathetic, even my Netbook manages to squeeze 3, a VGA port and a media card reader in. As far as OSX, I’m not so happy with, it has a few nuances that will take some getting used to, such as the command key which changes the way I use the keyboard (command+t, command+w, etc.) There is probably a fix for that and I’ve already changed some settings to make it more familiar.

My DNS-323 NAS had to have some changes to the Samba config using funplug as it doesn’t connect with SECURITY=SHARE, it has to be SECURITY=USER, not sure why that is. I’m happy to report that my SDR experiments were just as hard with OSX as they were with Linux, I blame that to not really knowing much about radio theory. Other than that, installing XCode, Macports and writing this post I haven’t really had much time to play with it. I’ll stick out using OSX until the training is over, then I’ll look at another OS. Until then, it’ll be VM’s and SSH connections into the desktop PC, which while aging still has more horse power than the Air.

image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dansapples/7157645924/

It is almost July!

Filed under: General Linux,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:54 pm on Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Since I haven’t posted in a while I figured I would, and hopefully start a new trend of writing again. I started a new job last year and had my wife gave birth to our first born in November 2012, since then my time has been somewhat limited, balancing work, life and play. If you take a look at the archives, it is not the first time I’ve taken a multiple break from this Blog.

Well, it’s almost July and you know what that means right? Yep, Google will be shutting down Reader. Their decision never made sense to me since my Feedburner, another Google product statistics show that 90% of my subscriptions are through the Reader service, there are alternatives.

While most people have migrated to other services, those that haven’t should consider doing so, or at least export their feeds to subscribe at a later time.

There are great desktop applications available for most platforms, but I wanted an online reader to sync feeds across multiple machines and read from different locations without having to mark content as read multiple times. The most viable online alternatives to me were Feedly, and TheOldReader.com. The Old Reader won in the end after adding standalone authentication. The interface is familiar as it is pretty much a clone of Google Reader, even the same keyboard shortcuts work.

I hope that when you do find the new feed reader of your choice, you continue to subscribe to TheLinuxBlog, and although it may have been stagnant for a while, I have not abandoned it.

The First Unreal Engine 3 Game Ships for Linux

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:23 pm on Friday, January 25, 2013

Guest Post From Davis Miller

Score! a HUGE victory for Linux gaming in 2013! Ryan Gordon confirmed via Twitter that “Dungeon Defenders is an Unreal Engine 3 game on Linux, and it’s the first thing I’ve shipped with SDL 2.0!” The launch of Humble Indie Bundle 7 is a tower defense and action oriented role playing game that was originally designed and released for the standard PC in 2011. Though it began as a development for Unreal Engine 3, it now has a native Linux port.

unreal-engine

The reality of Linux gaming has been in question for years. Interested parties jump in, and then jump out. Plagued by technical and developmental problems, Linux gaming technology has taken nothing more than baby steps over the years. The recent strides leading up to the shipment of a Linux ported games have happened incredibly fast, with no signs of slowing in the near future. (Read on …)

Buy Vs. Build Vs. Cloud

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:31 am on Wednesday, January 23, 2013

When a company needs a piece of software there is lots of open source software available that may suit their needs. But what happens when there isn’t?
Lets take a look employee performance evaluation software (like this) for example. To build a full featured business supporting application like this is no easy task. Lets weigh in the options:

Build It
There is always the option to build software, depending on the complexity this option can cost a lot of money. You need to either build from scratch, use a framework or modify an existing open source project. Some corporations have the funds for hardware, a development team, system administrators and support team. Those that dont are pretty much left with the buy or cloud solutions.

Buy it
If building isn’t an option due to cost another is to buy. Software support and hardware are sometimes additional costs buying is a viable option depending on the application. What is often the case for small to medium sized companies, a piece software will not feature what they need, while having 90% of everything else. This can lead to leaving critical business functions out, or even a hodgepodge of multiple versions of software that do the same thing.

Cloud / hosted solitions.
For certain applications “heading to the cloud” can be a smart way to go. Not having in house hardware to inventory and maintain is one benefit, and access from multiple locations is another. With the vendors providing support. One concern is security, although this is the same with tbe build/buy options that is often overlooked.

While off the shelf products may exist there are still expenses where choosing the hosted solution may turn out more cost effective.

The top 3 widely used open source accounting applications

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, December 19, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne

There many excellent options for open source accounting software which cover basically anything from ledger bookkeeping to report and forecasting. However, you must know that having an accounting software does not turn you into an accountant and you still need a basic grounding of the fundamentals of accounting and bookkeeping. However, these accounting software applications are a decent mix of old school accounting merged with ERP that helps you to understand where your business is going and what needs to be improved or fixed. Hit the jump for the top three picks for open source accounting software (Read on …)

10 Amazing Productivity Tools You Can’t Live Without

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:30 pm on Tuesday, December 18, 2012

This is a guest post from Ella.

As a small business owner, the Internet has changed the way I collaborate and work with my colleagues, contractors and clients. The business world is becoming more global all the time, and collaboration and communication are more important than ever.

Check out these slick little tools (some familiar, some new) that can help you stay on top of things and make working together across the Web a breeze.

(Read on …)

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