Linux Blog

Office 2007 docx to ODF Conversion

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:38 pm on Monday, September 29, 2008

I was going to write an article on how to open docx’s and other Office 2007 documents but there are numerous articles out there explaining how to do this on many distributions. They all basically say the same thing, you download the file, extract it and put it in your open office directory. Normally there are a couple of files but the on we are interested in is the main binary. What some people don’t know is that if you want to just quickly open or convert a document you can do so by using the odfconverter binary. (Read on …)

Charting your boot processes with bootchart

Filed under: Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:57 pm on Monday, September 22, 2008

Linux users often like to boast about their awesome bootup times. I thought that there was nothing cooler than getting a wicked fast bootup time, until now. A while back I found this nifty application called bootchart and shoved it in my bookmarks. I was randomly surfing my bookmarks, came across it again and gave it another shot. (Read on …)

shell script argument lists too long

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:19 am on Sunday, September 21, 2008

Sometimes you will run into the problem of having too many files in a folder. This results in basic programs like rm and mv to not be able to process your commands. For example, I recently had to extract 52628 jpgs from seven zip files. Once extracted I realized that I had them in the wrong folder. Now, there are other ways I could have accomplished the same goals, such but for various reasons sometimes the easiest way (renaming the folder) was not feasible. Here is the solution: (Read on …)

KDE End User Wiki

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:27 am on Friday, September 19, 2008

Today the KDE User base wiki (http://userbase.kde.org/) went live. If you’ve ever searched for information regarding an issue with KDE, its possible you would have come across the techbase (http://techbase.kde.org) The KDE Techbase is aimed more at developers and has some really good content regarding development. The KDE userbase Wiki also has some great information and you can learn a lot about KDE just by reading it. If you are a developer or an end user the userbase can be of great help, I just learned something new about plasma application launchers, check it out!

Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux Comparison

Filed under: Linux Video Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:13 am on Thursday, September 18, 2008

In my RSS feeds I found something interesting in my Linux related folder from Red Hat Magazine. They published a video titled The History of Fedora. This video is well produced and Greg DeKoenigsberg explains the differences and goals of both Red Hat Enterprise and Fedora. This may be obvious to some people but for those that do not know the differences this is a good alternate form of information other than reading. So, here it is:

http://www.redhatmagazine.com/2008/09/16/video-the-history-of-fedora/

Free Linux & Tech Related Books.

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:34 am on Tuesday, September 16, 2008

Share photos on twitter with Twitpic Hey there, this is Owen from TheLinuxBlog.com
Was just wondering, if any of you guys would be interested in some free books. I’ve got a ton of Linux and tech related books, I’m not ready to give them all up but here are two books I just got given. I want to read the VI/EX one and may keep it around. But I have another copy of the Perl one that’s in a little better shape, so the Perl one is definitely going. Leave a comment here or on twitter if your interested. You’ll have to pay shipping but it shouldn’t be expensive with media mail.

I’ve got a bunch of other books that I’d like to trade, sell or give away, but haven’t found a good “books” module for WordPress yet. Does any one else have books they no longer want or need? Would you guys be interested in trading or getting free books if you pay shipping? If there is interest, I’ll start a forum. I have access to a ton of non tech related books, but I’d rather keep it to a topic that I know. I’ll be posting more free books in the future so follow me on twitter and sign up for the RSS feed.

Using Subversion with SSH & Custom Ports

Filed under: Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:09 am on Monday, September 15, 2008

Lets say you use subversion on your home PC to keep track of projects and you want to checkout or export your project from a remote location. Here’s the catch, sshd is running on a custom port or forwarded from another. For some reason the command line SVN client does not support a port parameter when using the defacto svn+ssh://

svn co svn+ssh://thelinuxblog.com/owen/svn/project1/trunk project1
ssh: connect to host thelinuxblog.com port 22: Connection refused

Well we know why the error above happens its because I happen to run SSH on port 1337. The following work around requires root privileges, and may mess with your system a bit but if you really need to check something out, then it will work.

As root, login and stop SSH if you run it. With SSH Forward port 22 with a local SSH forwarding connection to the remote host.

[owen@thelinuxblog.com]$ sudo su -
[root@thelinuxblog.com]$ /sbin/service sshd stop
[root@thelinuxblog.com]$ ssh -p 1337 owen@thelinuxblog.com-L 22:[internal ip]:1337

Once this is done, your localhost:22 now forwards to your remote host. With another session (on your local machine) you can verify the connection by using ssh localhost. You will probably get warnings about the hosts identity being changed, or not verifying it, but you can ignore then. Once you’ve tested it, just use SVN as normal. When finished, remember to logout of the SSH session, and start SSH back up again if you run it.

Reworking Shell Scripts – Part 2

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:00 pm on Sunday, September 14, 2008

In the last Shell Script Sunday’s article I wrote, I said that I’d show you some more ways to rework shell scripts to make them easier to use. I’ve got some more tricks up my sleeve that I’d like to share, its  been rather busy this site of the internet at TheLinuxBlog.com. So why I write up some more shell scripting methods, here are some previous posts that can enhance your shell scripts. Be sure to comment on them if you find them useful, or would like more information.

Creating Dialogs with Dialog
If you have a shell script that you use on a regular basis, you may want to consider using dialog to make it more user friendly. Dialog makes it easy to create easy to use dialogs that are intuitive and easy to use. There are so many combinations of dialogs that can be created that the possibilities are ended. Dynamically create dialogs for select lists, input boxes, progress bars and much much more.

Graphical Shell Scripting
This article I wrote introduces graphical shell scripting. Similar to dialog this is an updated “Dialog” and works within X. If you support end users, or your target audience is Ubuntu/Linspire users (j/k) then XDialog may be the better choice. Its got most of the same functionality as Dialog except it depends on X. You can even support both Dialog and XDialog as they pretty much use the same syntax.

Who Opened Pandora’s Box?

Filed under: Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:36 am on Friday, September 12, 2008

I was reading my RSS feeds and happened to stumble across the OpenPandora. Until now I’d never heard of the OpenPandora, and had no idea what it was. Its actually a cool little device which they claim is the most powerful hand held computer in the world. Here are the specs from OpenPandora.Org

* ARM® Cortex™-A8 600Mhz+ CPU running Linux
* 430-MHz TMS320C64x+™ DSP Core
* PowerVR SGX OpenGL 2.0 ES compliant 3D hardware
* 800×480 4.3″ 16.7 million colours touchscreen LCD
* Wifi 802.11b/g, Bluetooth & High Speed USB 2.0 Host
* Dual SDHC card slots & SVideo TV output
* Dual Analogue and Digital gaming controls
* 43 button QWERTY and numeric keypad
* Around 10+ Hours battery life

The CPU is a decent speed, and the OpenGL supported video means the video will probably run better than it did on my old Toshiba laptop. While this is aimed at gamers, the console could be a good device for students or people who currently own Nokia N770’s, N800 or N810’s that are not satisfied. Although I wouldn’t use the gaming controls and it has a touch screen I can see why they put them in if they are going after a gaming crowd. If they want to get taken seriously out side of the gaming industry they may want to make a version that does not have the controls. They have some cool video demos available on their blog (here they are in case they get buried: http://www.gp2x.de/video/1080i.avi, http://www.gp2x.de/video/720p.avi) It still looks like they need to tweak it a little bit and make a graphical interface but even still it looks awesome.

It’s currently available for select developers and pre-orders on September 30th for about $330 USD and I really hope that this takes off. So if you’re asking who opened pandora’s box, OpenPandora did!

rsync to smb share

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:30 pm on Thursday, September 11, 2008

If you happen to have a SMB share with a lot of disk space laying around, then you may have considered backing up to it. There is more than one methods that you could back up to a SMB share but this article will show how to rsync to a smb share. This blog post assumes that you have successfully set up your SMB share and have installed RSync.
(Read on …)

Linux programmers ARE getting too fat

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:06 am on Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Tech Crunch posted an article today on Linux programmers and T-Shirt sizes. As normal Tech Crunch didn’t write any compelling content or make the graph. The graph is a graph that was taken from a slide show presentation at Linux Symposium. They did however link to FitBit and provide the following quote for me to blog about:

“obesity is a growing problem, particularly in the geek world”

(Read on …)

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