Linux Blog

Impressed with the PostgreSQL Installer

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:48 am on Monday, April 27, 2009

Until today I had never installed PostgreSQL from the Binary provided at postgresql.org since it’s pretty much always in some form of repository provided by most distributions. Today, for the first time ever I installed it and have to say I’m very impressed with the installer. I some what shuddered as I saw a “install shield” type installer interface, as my past encounters with these have generally tended to not work out so well. What I noticed about the PostgreSQL installer though was different from the “install shield”, it was BitRock. BitRock is a cross platform installer for “Windows, Linux, OS X and more…” as this was my first experience with BitRock with a Linux machine I have to say it was a positive one. It allowed me to install PostgreSQL with some custom components pretty effortlessly. While most won’t need to do a custom installation as PostgreSQL will probably be in a repository, its handy to know that the installer works.

BitRock does not appear to have a completely free license but they do seem to give open source projects a “free copy.” Not sure how I feel about this, but I guess if they’re out to make money then it could work for them. Apparentely it doesn’t take much to please me on a mundane Monday morning, I’d have been perfectly fine with a tarball and manual configuration but the GUI has brightened up my day. Thanks BitRock! Does any one else have any encounters or shocking experience with installers? What about BitRock in general?

What groups am I in?

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:45 am on Tuesday, April 21, 2009

@nongeekboy on Twitter tweeted? about a blog post: Simple Script To List Groups in passwd File. I read it and have done something similar before so I figured I’d blog it here so I won’t have to write it again. Anyway, along with the point of this post, since this is suppose to be quick.

A question that is often asked is “What groups am I in?”

The easiest way to find out is to type the command: groups
This will give you a list of the groups you are in separated by a space. There are some other fancy ways of getting the groups but they rely on the `id` command. Running groups with no user name, its the same as running id -Gn.

Here are some other variations that you can try if you need to script the output:

1
2
3
4
5
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9
groups
id
id -G
id -g
id -n
id -nG [user]
and the obvious:
id --help
info id

New Server – New Look?

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:01 pm on Wednesday, April 15, 2009

I’ve been wanting to redesign the site for a while, but never really got around to it. I hate to add something else to my to-do list or “goals for this year” but I think its necessary since I’ve knocked a couple of them off the list already. Problem is, I finally just got some page rank from Google after them giving me a big fat zero for a couple of months. I’d hate to redesign it and have it all vanish again, then again it could be good since I’d get to clean up the code some. I’ll get some mock ups done, then post them and see what people think. As far as content goes, I’ve been gathering subjects and am going to write a bunch of them soon, that way you won’t have to read News about the site that no one but me really cares about. Until next time, yea… I can’t think of anything catchy today.

Hey, The Linux Blog has Moved Servers!

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:03 am on Monday, April 13, 2009

Host GatorJust a quick update to let everyone know that The Linux Blog has moved servers. The hosting company I moved to is Hostgator. I was skeptical to move, since I was hosting it off of a shared dedicated server set up with cpanel/WHM reseller accounts, but I think that this will be better in the long run. For example: the price is right, it is faster and I do not have to worry so much about the system administration and hardware upgrades / failures. I get just about as much bandwidth with all the features I got before and a few extra that I couldn’t afford thrown in. All for about the cost of licensing cpanel and whm on their own. The only down side is the little amount of disk space, but if you decide not to be a reseller, you will be fine since they do an unlimited account (just check the fine print as I did on this one.) The really nice thing about the move is the hardware it runs off of (this is from cpanel and verified via ssh)

Processor #1 Vendor: GenuineIntelProcessor #1 Name: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           E5405  @ 2.00GHz

Processor #1 speed: 1994.900 MHz

Processor #1 cache size: 6144 KB

So, Dual Xeon Quad cores that you see above, which equates to quite an amount of CPU power, roughly 16GHz with all cores combined. It has I believe 8GB’s of ram and a ton of disk space which happens to be provided by scsi disks. Hostgator have servers in each of ThePlanet.com’s data centers, I could go on about them all day but if I were you I’d check their website, its all under the “Company” link at the bottom of the page. You might see some banners up around here from now on and you’re probably smart enough to figure out the rest.

If you’re reading this that means you’re reading it off of the new server. Hopefully all went well and it loaded a little quicker. I’m hoping that there wasn’t any disruption of services, there wasn’t for me except for e-mail services but I think that has something to do with the DNS on the server I was sending the mail from (the old one.) Anyhow I hope you enjoy and if you’re in the market for a new web host use my Hostgator links!

Reattach Screen Script

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:02 pm on Sunday, April 12, 2009

A friend of mine who happens to be an avid screen user sent me this snippet below:

### Reattach to a screen if one exists ###
if [[ $TERM != 'screen' ]] ; then
if [[ `screen -list | grep -v "No" | awk '$2 { print }' | wc -l` == 0 ]] ; then
screen
else
screen -dr
fi
fi

What this handy snippet does is looks for a screen session, if it finds one it detaches the running screen, and reattaches it(-dr) if it isn’t lucky enough to find one, then it just starts a session up for you. Its rather handy to put in your .bashrc file to auto launch a screen session. The only thing I have modified for my use is replacing -dr for -x to enable me to reattach the screen without detaching the session I may have had open on another terminal. It works pretty well, although when you open a new “screen” CTRL-a + c, the tab doesn’t show up on the other sessions until you change to it, or cycle through them. It isn’t a big deal and could even be a local configuration issue. Anyway, enjoy this snippet and as always let me know if you found it useful.

Super Tux Cart FTW

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:52 am on Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Super Tux Cart It has been a while since I’ve even thought about posting about a game and come to think of it, I don’t think I ever have. If I have not, then this would be a great first game to add here, and if I have we can forget about it because Super Tux Cart is so much more fun.

Super Tux Cart as you can imagine is a game similar to that of a particular game that is available for most of the Nintendo systems. Basically you ride around in a go cart racing either another computer, or up to three other players.

The Super Tux Cart team have added a bunch of features, maps and bug fixes since I last looked at it. A networked version is in the works so when thats done, if any one wants to have a tournament let me know. I’d love to race.

Open Source Stickers

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:13 pm on Monday, April 6, 2009

Open Source StickersEveryday that I browse the internet I usually bookmark a ton of stuff, well today I’m posting one of those things that have been stuck in my bookmarks for ages.

Everybody loves stickers, but these stickers are special because they’re all open source related and you have to make them yourself. There are two volumes each with at the least a metric ton of stickers in them. I browsed through them and found some I really liked. I don’t have a sticker maker but they print well on a colour laser and  look great stuck on my wall at the office. I guess its a good thing I don’t have a sticker maker, nobody likes sticker mildew. http://openstickers.com

Basic Scripting Snippets Repository

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:04 pm on Sunday, April 5, 2009

Everyone has their own favorite snippets of code that they use. With command line fu you can share your snippets and look at snippets that other people have posted. I’ve known about it for quite some time and frequently check it out, it’s really shaping up nicely.


Command-Line-Fu is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again.

Delete that bloated snippets file you’ve been using and share your personal repository with the world. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on and discussed – digg-esque voting is also encouraged so the best float to the top.

I don’t think that you should delete your snippets file, just in-case you don’t have the intrawebs but I think you could get something out of browsing through the highest rated if nothing else.

Fedora 11 Upgrade from Alpha to Beta

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:56 am on Wednesday, April 1, 2009

After my mistake downloading the Alpha, I was able to update to the Beta by doing some pretty basic stuff.

First to aid I set up sudo, and changed my default run level to 3. I installed bash-completion (a mandatory package) and then changed to run level 3 with telinit. Once down to a reasonable run level for a systems upgrade, yum update -y was issued. I believe this failed, so I read the release notes and did the yum –skip-broken update command. It was rather scary since the broken libraries were glibc’s and those can be a pain. After a hour or more I was back to the prompt. Another yum update -y just to make sure and I was ready to reboot.

Rebooting actually worked first time and my Fedora was updated from 10.91 to 10.92. Using this method does not give you ext4 but, at least it will upgrade you to the latest Beta. Now, if only my production installation upgrades would have gone this smoothly.