Linux Blog

A Bug Hunter’s Diary Review

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 pm on Monday, May 21, 2012

A Bug Hunter’s Diary, by┬áTobias Klein, from No Starch Press is a book that caught my eye. Reverse engineering is a topic I have an interest in, if not much experience, but I am not quite ready for a comprehensive book on the topic. A Bug Hunter’s Diary seemed like a good match for my interests but, initially, I wasn’t sure what to expect from it.

To my pleasant surprise, I walked away with a lot of fantastic technical information; much more than I expected from a technical book that read like a story. A Bug Hunter’s Diary gives great insight into the bug hunting process. It outlines various techniques used to find bugs, and then moves on to exploitation and outlines some of the remediation techniques and processes. For each bug, a chapter is presented with necessary background information, plenty of technical information and code, a detailed explanation, and a timeline outlining the process.

Tobias Klein┬ádid a great job explaining what was being done and why, even for those (like me) who know very little about assembly language. Unfortunately, due to the laws of the country in which the author lives, A Bug Hunter’s Diary doesn’t show working exploits but he does provide links to demonstration videos online throughout.

I initially read this book on the Kindle before a hard copy arrived. It reads very well on the Kindle, with the exception of a few tables. A short and delightful read, I devoured A Bug Hunter’s Diary cover to cover in record time. Once I started reading, I would find it hard to put down. For me it was a great book that has re-ignited my interests, motivating me to learn more, and I look forward to reading it again.

Guidelines for Beginners to Linux Directory Structure

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:30 am on Friday, May 18, 2012

Guest Post by Brianne

Linux directory structure is not very complex but is different from the directory structure one comes across in other operating systems. The structure is so built that the different kinds of files with varied functions are effectively segregated into specific directories. The root partition and the root directory form the base of the Linux directory structure. Under the root directory, there are several directories that contain files meant for use for a particular purpose. System files are separated from the user files, so are the command and device files. Here is a detailed look at the various directories and the premise of their existence.

(Read on …)

Important Linux Distros for Beginners in 2012

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Tuesday, May 1, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne.

There is wide variety of Linux Distros in the market. Each one differs in size, design, support and layout, although the basic function is the same. Each distros offers several unique features apart from main features. There is a heavy competition among distributors to create and develop unique features. Each of these distros offers different types of support systems such as forums, live chat, and other means. That is why it is necessary to select the distributor based on your requirement.

Here is a list of Important Linux distributors for beginners in 2012.

(Read on …)