Linux Blog

xrandr – Set Primary Monitor

Filed under: Linux Hardware,Linux Software,Shell Script Sundays — Owen at 11:04 pm on Sunday, October 27, 2013

I had an issue with my dual monitor setup where my primary monitor was my second, but only in X. Rearranging the monitors in Gnome preferences did nothing to solve the problem. While not exactly a shell script, here is a one-liner to change your primary monitor with xrandr.

#!/bin/bash
xrandr --output DVI-0 --primary

The above uses xrandr to set the primary to DVI-0. I put this in my ~/bin folder, chmod’d and set it to start when Gnome starts. Problem solved!

Raspberry Pi – Awesome!

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:17 pm on Thursday, October 24, 2013

Raspberry Pi

I never jumped on the Pi bandwagon, sure I thought it was cool but when I wanted one, there were supply demands and the want wore off. I recently purchased a Model B revision Two and have to say I’m very impressed. It is an awesome piece of hardware but what really makes the Raspberry Pi great is the community that has been built around them. There are many projects and tutorials based and plenty of hackers working on tweaking and expanding them. Here are a few of my favorite projects, incase you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of years like me:
(Read on …)

Login Script to Phone Home

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:59 pm on Monday, October 7, 2013

If you’re a little paranoid like me, you often wonder what will happen if your laptop gets stolen. I’ve seen news articles and the like where an thief happened to steal a laptop and got caught because they stole the wrong persons laptop.

Today we have a one liner that will phone home when a user logs in. While this wont work if you have a password on your laptop, which is recommended, if you keep a dummy account called “User” or “Guest” with no password and the thief happens to log in, you could be in luck.

#!/bin/bash 
ssh -N -R2222:localhost:22 <user>@<yourhost> -p<port> -i /home/<user>/.ssh/id_rsa

The simple SSH command opens up a remote port 2222 to the local port 22 which of course requires SSH to be running locally. It also uses the ssh identity file, for ano password ssh login, and the -N is for no shell. Set it up as an application that starts on login and if that account is set to auto connect to WiFi, it will connect as the user logs in. If you wanted to take it a step further you could combine it with autossh to continue trying to connect. It will also help if you have a static IP or DNS setup so that it will be able to connect if your device unfortunately goes missing.