Linux Blog

CORRECTION – Using BASH to sort a book collection. ISBN Data Mining – Part 1

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 am on Sunday, January 25, 2015

This may be cheating but I consider it a break from the download cleanup script.

Amazingly I got a comment out of the blue from an article I wrote in 2007 about ISBN Data Mining. The comment, stated the fact that the script didn’t work. I did a little investigating and was able to find out why. I figured it was just old and didn’t work but that was not the case. Apparently when I formatted my posts for code, a while back it appears that some of the formatting got a bit fubar.

Luckily for me and Gabe I was able to find an old copy:

Here is his script:

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#!/bin/bash
ISBN="$1"
 
function fetchInfo () {
  ### Using barnesandnoble.com to fetch info...
  lynx -source "http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ISBN=${ISBN}" |\
   tr -d '[:cntrl:]' | sed 's/></>\n</g' | while read -a lineArray; do
 
  ### Parsing book title.
  if [ "${lineArray[0]}" == "<h1" ]; then
   echo "4|Title: ${lineArray[*]}" | sed 's/<[^>]*>//g;s/ ([^)]*)//g'
 
  ### Parsing book author.
 elif [ "$(echo ${lineArray[*]} | grep "id=\"contributor\"")" ]; then
  echo "3|Author(s): ${lineArray[*]}" | sed 's/by //;s/<[^>]*>//g'
 
  ### Parsing additional data.
  elif [ "${lineArray[0]}" == "<li" ] &&
     [ "$(echo ${lineArray[*]} | grep -ve "bullet" -ve "title")" ]; then
   echo "1|${lineArray[*]}" | sed 's/<[^>]*>//g;s/:/: /;s/  / /'
  fi
 
  done | sort -ur | awk -F\| '{print $2}' | grep ":"
 
}
 
if [ "${#ISBN}" -ge "10" ]; then
   fetchInfo
fi

The script should be saved to a file and called as ./isbn.sh . Amazingly after all of these years it still works, I guess that’s one of the beauties of shell scripting. Here is the output:

owen@linuxblog:~$ isbn.sh 1593275676
Title:  How Linux Works: What Every Superuser Should Know    by  Brian Ward

Here is ISBN Data Mining – Part 2 although, I cannot guarantee that it works after 8 years.

Auto Clean-up Downloaded Files – Part III

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 am on Sunday, January 18, 2015

In Part 2, we added some read prompts to read which directory to run the script in and used some bash if/then/else statements to do some basic input validation. This week by using the creating script parameters with getopts article we’ll enhance the script a little to remove the echo from the example to allow the user to delete the files if they choose, defaulting to not remove files.
(Read on …)

Mac Annoyances and Fixes.

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:00 am on Wednesday, January 14, 2015

I got a Mac a while back, out of the box there were a few things that bothered me. This isn’t a comprehensive list, I could go on and on, but here are a few things that are easy to fix.
(Read on …)

Auto Clean-up Downloaded Files – Part II

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 am on Sunday, January 11, 2015

Last week I showed a one liner that could be used to remove duplicate files from your downloads folder. Using previous Shell Script Sunday articles, over the next few weeks we’ll add some additional functionality to make it a little more functional.

On its own the snippet is not that useful. The script will only run in the current directory. Adding a prompt to ask the user what directory to run in, or defaulting to the current directory would be a nice addition. Using the Shell Script to Get User Input article you’ll see that adding some prompts with read is pretty easy. Next we’ll use some bash if/then/else statements to read over that input to check for blank input and a check to make sure that it is a valid directory, exiting if it is not.
(Read on …)

Auto Clean-up Downloaded Files

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:37 am on Sunday, January 4, 2015

This week I went through my downloads folder, cleaning up erroneous files. In light of that I’ll share a quick tip on how to clean up the multiple copies of files that inevitably pile up. The issue is, when you save a file from firefox or Chrome, the next time you download the file, it just makes another copy with (1) or (2). I have a number of these on multiple systems, so hit the jump for a quick snippet, and explanation.
(Read on …)