Linux Blog

Raspberry Pi – Awesome!

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:17 pm on Thursday, October 24, 2013

Raspberry Pi

I never jumped on the Pi bandwagon, sure I thought it was cool but when I wanted one, there were supply demands and the want wore off. I recently purchased a Model B revision Two and have to say I’m very impressed. It is an awesome piece of hardware but what really makes the Raspberry Pi great is the community that has been built around them. There are many projects and tutorials based and plenty of hackers working on tweaking and expanding them. Here are a few of my favorite projects, incase you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of years like me:
(Read on …)

It is almost July!

Filed under: General Linux,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:54 pm on Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Since I haven’t posted in a while I figured I would, and hopefully start a new trend of writing again. I started a new job last year and had my wife gave birth to our first born in November 2012, since then my time has been somewhat limited, balancing work, life and play. If you take a look at the archives, it is not the first time I’ve taken a multiple break from this Blog.

Well, it’s almost July and you know what that means right? Yep, Google will be shutting down Reader. Their decision never made sense to me since my Feedburner, another Google product statistics show that 90% of my subscriptions are through the Reader service, there are alternatives.

While most people have migrated to other services, those that haven’t should consider doing so, or at least export their feeds to subscribe at a later time.

There are great desktop applications available for most platforms, but I wanted an online reader to sync feeds across multiple machines and read from different locations without having to mark content as read multiple times. The most viable online alternatives to me were Feedly, and TheOldReader.com. The Old Reader won in the end after adding standalone authentication. The interface is familiar as it is pretty much a clone of Google Reader, even the same keyboard shortcuts work.

I hope that when you do find the new feed reader of your choice, you continue to subscribe to TheLinuxBlog, and although it may have been stagnant for a while, I have not abandoned it.

The First Unreal Engine 3 Game Ships for Linux

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:23 pm on Friday, January 25, 2013

Guest Post From Davis Miller

Score! a HUGE victory for Linux gaming in 2013! Ryan Gordon confirmed via Twitter that “Dungeon Defenders is an Unreal Engine 3 game on Linux, and it’s the first thing I’ve shipped with SDL 2.0!” The launch of Humble Indie Bundle 7 is a tower defense and action oriented role playing game that was originally designed and released for the standard PC in 2011. Though it began as a development for Unreal Engine 3, it now has a native Linux port.

unreal-engine

The reality of Linux gaming has been in question for years. Interested parties jump in, and then jump out. Plagued by technical and developmental problems, Linux gaming technology has taken nothing more than baby steps over the years. The recent strides leading up to the shipment of a Linux ported games have happened incredibly fast, with no signs of slowing in the near future. (Read on …)

Buy Vs. Build Vs. Cloud

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:31 am on Wednesday, January 23, 2013

When a company needs a piece of software there is lots of open source software available that may suit their needs. But what happens when there isn’t?
Lets take a look employee performance evaluation software (like this) for example. To build a full featured business supporting application like this is no easy task. Lets weigh in the options:

Build It
There is always the option to build software, depending on the complexity this option can cost a lot of money. You need to either build from scratch, use a framework or modify an existing open source project. Some corporations have the funds for hardware, a development team, system administrators and support team. Those that dont are pretty much left with the buy or cloud solutions.

Buy it
If building isn’t an option due to cost another is to buy. Software support and hardware are sometimes additional costs buying is a viable option depending on the application. What is often the case for small to medium sized companies, a piece software will not feature what they need, while having 90% of everything else. This can lead to leaving critical business functions out, or even a hodgepodge of multiple versions of software that do the same thing.

Cloud / hosted solitions.
For certain applications “heading to the cloud” can be a smart way to go. Not having in house hardware to inventory and maintain is one benefit, and access from multiple locations is another. With the vendors providing support. One concern is security, although this is the same with tbe build/buy options that is often overlooked.

While off the shelf products may exist there are still expenses where choosing the hosted solution may turn out more cost effective.

10 Amazing Productivity Tools You Can’t Live Without

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:30 pm on Tuesday, December 18, 2012

This is a guest post from Ella.

As a small business owner, the Internet has changed the way I collaborate and work with my colleagues, contractors and clients. The business world is becoming more global all the time, and collaboration and communication are more important than ever.

Check out these slick little tools (some familiar, some new) that can help you stay on top of things and make working together across the Web a breeze.

(Read on …)

Top 10 Android Applications for 2012

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Here is another post from Brianne on her top 10 Android application picks for 2012. Being an Android user myself these aren’t my top 10. Mine, without descriptions are: ConnectBot, androidVNC, Sipdroid, AndSMB, ColorNote, PocketCloud, FreeMP3Droid, ViewRangerGPS, VirtualRecorder and TeslaLED. Feel free to list your top 10 or suggestions in the comments! So without further ado, here’s her take:

Stay organized on the top of your busy lifestyle with these productive Android apps. The apps on this list tend to make your life simple, easy and eliminate time-consuming procedures. Make sure to install them to increase your productivity.

  1. Xbox SmartGlass

Xbox SmartGlass from Microsoft turns your android into an ideal second screen to navigate around the Xbox 360 dashboard and makes your entertainment experience more amazing. You can easily control what you’re watching with simple swipe and tap gestures. Xbox allows you to access the relevant details about a movie, game or TV show. It also lets you to easily move your purchased movies and TV shows between your PC and your Xbox 360. Xbox through its intelligently connected devices make things easier for you.

2. Soundcloud- Version 2.3.0

Soundcloud is the best app for recording interviews or your favorite music on-the-go. It lets you sync all your recordings to the Cloud so that you can share them publicly on Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare or keep them as private. The latest version makes it easy to explore and post likes and comments on sounds right from your smart phone. It helps you to access user profiles and keep track of your followers and followings.

3. Opera Mini – Version 7.5

Opera mini offers the most refined browsing experience for your android phone. It’s rendering speed and efficient controls put it on the top of other browsers. Its streamlined rendering engine helps you load Webpage’s quicker than any other browser. Just as you do with your PC, you can open several pages at a time and switch between them using tabs. Opera Mini helps you save money on your phone bills by compressing data by up to 80%.

4. Cloudon

Cloudon brings Microsoft Office to your Android phone. It allows you to easily format text, change fonts, insert formulas in Excel and present your Power Point slides. It enables you to view and fill out PDFs from your workspace. With a simple tap you can have your files appear in your workplace. Cloudon lets you create copy or move files between folders. All your documents are saved automatically.

5. CamScanner

This app is a must have for android phones. If you’re on the go and need to capture documents such as interesting newspaper articles, whiteboard sketches, tickets, coupons and so on, consider using CamScanner app. This app turns your Android phone into a portable document scanner. It uses the camera at the back of your android to take the snapshots of the documents. The images scanned by CamScanner are already edited. Its in-built tools enhance the appearance of the scanned image. What’s more, you can easily convert the scanned documents to PDFs, especially when you want to share it. You are allowed to tag the scanned documents so that they are easy to locate and manage.

6. TeamViewer- Version 7.0.632

Teamviewer lets you remote control your computer while you are on the go. You can participate in meetings from your android phone, no matter where you are. Thus it helps you from missing out an important discussion. It also offers you the benefit of accessing your home PC to edit or use particular documents while you are away from home. The app helps you provide remote technical support to friends and family when they have problems with their device.

7. TRUECALLER – VERSION 2.92

Truecaller app functions as a global phone directory helping you to locate people worldwide by just entering a name or phone number. It quickly notifies you who the caller is and blocks unwanted calls. The app manages your phone book and keeps you informed of your friend’s latest Facebook pictures.

8. Fandango Movies – Version 4.1.1

This app allows you to easily browse the movies or theaters by selecting them. On selecting a movie, you can access its information like the rating, length, fan reviews, trailers and so on. If you select a theater, you will be informed of its address and phone number. You can book your seat directly from this app and step into the theater just before Showtime.

9. Zillow Real Estate

This is the best app that provides you with a better idea of current values and trends in housing. Zillow’s database helps you browse apartments and homes that are for sale or rent. The new version lets you take snapshots of your favorite homes and sync them to your online account. It keeps you updated when new homes with your criteria hit the market. Enjoy home shopping on the big screen.

10. SwiftKey 3

SwiftKey app makes typing easy and accurate over time. It saves your time and effort by magically predicting the next word before you’ve started to type. You can also personalize this app with your Gmail or Facebook accounts.

About the author: Brianne is a blogger by profession. She loves writing, reading and traveling. She contributes to Raul Antonio Gorrin

 

LINUTOP 2 Review

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:08 pm on Friday, November 9, 2012

Linutop is a company based out of Paris that specializes in small form factor energy efficient embedded type PC’s. They have  a variety of devices with no moving parts and utilize open source software based on Ubuntu for the platform. They were kind enough to send me a Linutop 2 to review.Linutop 2


(Read on …)

How Android apps are useful to get new blogging ideas

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:51 pm on Thursday, October 18, 2012

 

This post is a guest post written by Brianne. She is blogger by profession. These days she is working on online promotion for Go Pilot

It is true that the bloggers will need some applications which will help them to connect with their blogging on the move. So the Android applications come handy in this connection. Moreover, you will keep touch always through these applications with your blog. Since, the Android applications provide the ample advantages to the bloggers. Even, these Android applications will give you an extra fillip for running smoothly your blogging habit. 

(Read on …)

File Cleanup Tools and Tactics

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:35 pm on Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Ok, I’ll admit it; I’m a digital hoarder. I’ve had this problem for a while where I can’t seem to delete stuff. Perhaps its files I’ve created, stuff I’ve downloaded, backups, or backups of backups but files seem to accumulate faster than I can keep up with organizing them. Throw this on top of system re-installs and, being the family geek backups of family members and freelance work to be honest, I’m a bit overwhelmed!

Well, it stops today! At least the start of organization that is. I’ve written in the past about spring cleaning tools, recursive md5sum scripts and tools like md5deep but nothing really came of it. It’s time to take action and get stuff organized. Now I’ve admitted it publicly, I’m sort of obligated to get in control of my digital life and so the voyage begins.

Stay tuned for more posts on digital organization techniques and tools!

A Bug Hunter’s Diary Review

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 pm on Monday, May 21, 2012

A Bug Hunter’s Diary, by Tobias Klein, from No Starch Press is a book that caught my eye. Reverse engineering is a topic I have an interest in, if not much experience, but I am not quite ready for a comprehensive book on the topic. A Bug Hunter’s Diary seemed like a good match for my interests but, initially, I wasn’t sure what to expect from it.

To my pleasant surprise, I walked away with a lot of fantastic technical information; much more than I expected from a technical book that read like a story. A Bug Hunter’s Diary gives great insight into the bug hunting process. It outlines various techniques used to find bugs, and then moves on to exploitation and outlines some of the remediation techniques and processes. For each bug, a chapter is presented with necessary background information, plenty of technical information and code, a detailed explanation, and a timeline outlining the process.

Tobias Klein did a great job explaining what was being done and why, even for those (like me) who know very little about assembly language. Unfortunately, due to the laws of the country in which the author lives, A Bug Hunter’s Diary doesn’t show working exploits but he does provide links to demonstration videos online throughout.

I initially read this book on the Kindle before a hard copy arrived. It reads very well on the Kindle, with the exception of a few tables. A short and delightful read, I devoured A Bug Hunter’s Diary cover to cover in record time. Once I started reading, I would find it hard to put down. For me it was a great book that has re-ignited my interests, motivating me to learn more, and I look forward to reading it again.

Guidelines for Beginners to Linux Directory Structure

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:30 am on Friday, May 18, 2012

Guest Post by Brianne

Linux directory structure is not very complex but is different from the directory structure one comes across in other operating systems. The structure is so built that the different kinds of files with varied functions are effectively segregated into specific directories. The root partition and the root directory form the base of the Linux directory structure. Under the root directory, there are several directories that contain files meant for use for a particular purpose. System files are separated from the user files, so are the command and device files. Here is a detailed look at the various directories and the premise of their existence.

(Read on …)

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