Linux Blog

Top 10 Android Applications for 2012

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Here is another post from Brianne on her top 10 Android application picks for 2012. Being an Android user myself these aren’t my top 10. Mine, without descriptions are: ConnectBot, androidVNC, Sipdroid, AndSMB, ColorNote, PocketCloud, FreeMP3Droid, ViewRangerGPS, VirtualRecorder and TeslaLED. Feel free to list your top 10 or suggestions in the comments! So without further ado, here’s her take:

Stay organized on the top of your busy lifestyle with these productive Android apps. The apps on this list tend to make your life simple, easy and eliminate time-consuming procedures. Make sure to install them to increase your productivity.

  1. Xbox SmartGlass

Xbox SmartGlass from Microsoft turns your android into an ideal second screen to navigate around the Xbox 360 dashboard and makes your entertainment experience more amazing. You can easily control what you’re watching with simple swipe and tap gestures. Xbox allows you to access the relevant details about a movie, game or TV show. It also lets you to easily move your purchased movies and TV shows between your PC and your Xbox 360. Xbox through its intelligently connected devices make things easier for you.

2. Soundcloud- Version 2.3.0

Soundcloud is the best app for recording interviews or your favorite music on-the-go. It lets you sync all your recordings to the Cloud so that you can share them publicly on Facebook, Twitter and Foursquare or keep them as private. The latest version makes it easy to explore and post likes and comments on sounds right from your smart phone. It helps you to access user profiles and keep track of your followers and followings.

3. Opera Mini – Version 7.5

Opera mini offers the most refined browsing experience for your android phone. It’s rendering speed and efficient controls put it on the top of other browsers. Its streamlined rendering engine helps you load Webpage’s quicker than any other browser. Just as you do with your PC, you can open several pages at a time and switch between them using tabs. Opera Mini helps you save money on your phone bills by compressing data by up to 80%.

4. Cloudon

Cloudon brings Microsoft Office to your Android phone. It allows you to easily format text, change fonts, insert formulas in Excel and present your Power Point slides. It enables you to view and fill out PDFs from your workspace. With a simple tap you can have your files appear in your workplace. Cloudon lets you create copy or move files between folders. All your documents are saved automatically.

5. CamScanner

This app is a must have for android phones. If you’re on the go and need to capture documents such as interesting newspaper articles, whiteboard sketches, tickets, coupons and so on, consider using CamScanner app. This app turns your Android phone into a portable document scanner. It uses the camera at the back of your android to take the snapshots of the documents. The images scanned by CamScanner are already edited. Its in-built tools enhance the appearance of the scanned image. What’s more, you can easily convert the scanned documents to PDFs, especially when you want to share it. You are allowed to tag the scanned documents so that they are easy to locate and manage.

6. TeamViewer- Version 7.0.632

Teamviewer lets you remote control your computer while you are on the go. You can participate in meetings from your android phone, no matter where you are. Thus it helps you from missing out an important discussion. It also offers you the benefit of accessing your home PC to edit or use particular documents while you are away from home. The app helps you provide remote technical support to friends and family when they have problems with their device.

7. TRUECALLER – VERSION 2.92

Truecaller app functions as a global phone directory helping you to locate people worldwide by just entering a name or phone number. It quickly notifies you who the caller is and blocks unwanted calls. The app manages your phone book and keeps you informed of your friend’s latest Facebook pictures.

8. Fandango Movies – Version 4.1.1

This app allows you to easily browse the movies or theaters by selecting them. On selecting a movie, you can access its information like the rating, length, fan reviews, trailers and so on. If you select a theater, you will be informed of its address and phone number. You can book your seat directly from this app and step into the theater just before Showtime.

9. Zillow Real Estate

This is the best app that provides you with a better idea of current values and trends in housing. Zillow’s database helps you browse apartments and homes that are for sale or rent. The new version lets you take snapshots of your favorite homes and sync them to your online account. It keeps you updated when new homes with your criteria hit the market. Enjoy home shopping on the big screen.

10. SwiftKey 3

SwiftKey app makes typing easy and accurate over time. It saves your time and effort by magically predicting the next word before you’ve started to type. You can also personalize this app with your Gmail or Facebook accounts.

About the author: Brianne is a blogger by profession. She loves writing, reading and traveling. She contributes to Raul Antonio Gorrin

 

LINUTOP 2 Review

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:08 pm on Friday, November 9, 2012

Linutop is a company based out of Paris that specializes in small form factor energy efficient embedded type PC’s. They have  a variety of devices with no moving parts and utilize open source software based on Ubuntu for the platform. They were kind enough to send me a Linutop 2 to review.Linutop 2


(Read on …)

How Android apps are useful to get new blogging ideas

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:51 pm on Thursday, October 18, 2012

 

This post is a guest post written by Brianne. She is blogger by profession. These days she is working on online promotion for Go Pilot

It is true that the bloggers will need some applications which will help them to connect with their blogging on the move. So the Android applications come handy in this connection. Moreover, you will keep touch always through these applications with your blog. Since, the Android applications provide the ample advantages to the bloggers. Even, these Android applications will give you an extra fillip for running smoothly your blogging habit. 

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File Cleanup Tools and Tactics

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:35 pm on Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Ok, I’ll admit it; I’m a digital hoarder. I’ve had this problem for a while where I can’t seem to delete stuff. Perhaps its files I’ve created, stuff I’ve downloaded, backups, or backups of backups but files seem to accumulate faster than I can keep up with organizing them. Throw this on top of system re-installs and, being the family geek backups of family members and freelance work to be honest, I’m a bit overwhelmed!

Well, it stops today! At least the start of organization that is. I’ve written in the past about spring cleaning tools, recursive md5sum scripts and tools like md5deep but nothing really came of it. It’s time to take action and get stuff organized. Now I’ve admitted it publicly, I’m sort of obligated to get in control of my digital life and so the voyage begins.

Stay tuned for more posts on digital organization techniques and tools!

A Bug Hunter’s Diary Review

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 pm on Monday, May 21, 2012

A Bug Hunter’s Diary, by Tobias Klein, from No Starch Press is a book that caught my eye. Reverse engineering is a topic I have an interest in, if not much experience, but I am not quite ready for a comprehensive book on the topic. A Bug Hunter’s Diary seemed like a good match for my interests but, initially, I wasn’t sure what to expect from it.

To my pleasant surprise, I walked away with a lot of fantastic technical information; much more than I expected from a technical book that read like a story. A Bug Hunter’s Diary gives great insight into the bug hunting process. It outlines various techniques used to find bugs, and then moves on to exploitation and outlines some of the remediation techniques and processes. For each bug, a chapter is presented with necessary background information, plenty of technical information and code, a detailed explanation, and a timeline outlining the process.

Tobias Klein did a great job explaining what was being done and why, even for those (like me) who know very little about assembly language. Unfortunately, due to the laws of the country in which the author lives, A Bug Hunter’s Diary doesn’t show working exploits but he does provide links to demonstration videos online throughout.

I initially read this book on the Kindle before a hard copy arrived. It reads very well on the Kindle, with the exception of a few tables. A short and delightful read, I devoured A Bug Hunter’s Diary cover to cover in record time. Once I started reading, I would find it hard to put down. For me it was a great book that has re-ignited my interests, motivating me to learn more, and I look forward to reading it again.

Guidelines for Beginners to Linux Directory Structure

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:30 am on Friday, May 18, 2012

Guest Post by Brianne

Linux directory structure is not very complex but is different from the directory structure one comes across in other operating systems. The structure is so built that the different kinds of files with varied functions are effectively segregated into specific directories. The root partition and the root directory form the base of the Linux directory structure. Under the root directory, there are several directories that contain files meant for use for a particular purpose. System files are separated from the user files, so are the command and device files. Here is a detailed look at the various directories and the premise of their existence.

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Important Linux Distros for Beginners in 2012

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Tuesday, May 1, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne.

There is wide variety of Linux Distros in the market. Each one differs in size, design, support and layout, although the basic function is the same. Each distros offers several unique features apart from main features. There is a heavy competition among distributors to create and develop unique features. Each of these distros offers different types of support systems such as forums, live chat, and other means. That is why it is necessary to select the distributor based on your requirement.

Here is a list of Important Linux distributors for beginners in 2012.

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NetworkManager ‘device not managed’ Fix

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:43 pm on Sunday, April 8, 2012

Recently I ran into an issue where a new installation of Debian didn’t have NetworkManager set up correctly. Everytime I tried to use NetworkManager it had an issue with the devices not being managed. Luckily there was a man page for networkmanager.conf and its a quick fix.

All you have to do is

sudo vi /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf

and change:

[ifupdown]
managed=false
 
# to
[ifupdown]
managed=true
 
# Then
sudo service network-manager restart

And it’s fixed. Your wireless and ethernet connections will then be managed by NetworkManager. If you don’t want network manager to manage anymore you can just stop the service, or disable it at boot time by removing it from your /etc/rc[x].d/ directory where [x] corresponds to your runlevel. Enjoy!

Spring Cleaning

Filed under: General Linux,Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Sunday, April 1, 2012

It’s that time of year, tree’s, plants and animals doing there thing. The time of the year where other wildlife and beings start cleaning up since the weather is nice. I guess it’s time for a post on some spring cleaning for the Linux folk

We will start off with a classic, sure to give you a clean start:
rm -rf .
Best done from root, just remember to press CTRL+c and/or reboot as quickly as possible when you realize what you have done.

On a serious note, I had a bunch of annoying hidden files in backup directories I wanted to get rid of. This did the trick.

find . -iname ".*"
find . -iname ".*" | wc -l
find . -iname ".*" | while read i ; do echo rm "$i" >> possibly_remove; done;

The above is conservative. ‘chmod 755 possibly_remove’, verify there are no files in there you actually want, you are in the correct directory then ‘./possibly_remove’ and you’re golden. Mmm. Spring freshness.

Since I like to live on the wild side, I run it without creating a file of files to delete that can be executed like this:

find . -iname ".*" | while read i ; do rm "$i"; done;

This will also work to cleanup nasty files that may have been accumulating a while that may be have left behind. It can be used to find and delete all Thumbs.db files by doing this:

find . -iname "thumbs.db" | while read i ; do rm "$i"; done;

The above is pretty careless, in most cases it probably wouldn’t hurt.

That is all the spring cleaning I have done, except for some random fsck’ing’ that was long overdue.

Auto mounting a partition

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:03 pm on Monday, March 26, 2012

It’s been a while. A while since I’ve had to actually had to manually edit the /etc/fstab to automount a partition. So long, that I searched my blog trying to find out how to do it. To my surprise, I’d never actually written one. If I had, I couldn’t find it. Here’s to you, memory:

According to /etc/fstab this is how it’s done

# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

For those of us that are human, that can mean very little. What you can do, in hopefully slightly more understandable terms is add a line that looks like this:

/dev/sd[a|b|c][x] /mnt/[location] [filesystem] defaults 0 0

What that looks like in my case is:

/dev/sda5 /mnt/sda5 ext4 defaults 0 0

Save, exit and reboot. Hope for the best :)

Disclaimer – I did manage to find the man page for fstab while searching!

OpenStack: A Story about Confidence

Filed under: General Linux — Owen at 7:25 pm on Saturday, March 3, 2012

Today we have a guest article submitted by Jesse L. on OpenStack. Enjoy!

Open source solutions, while certainly nothing new, have exploded into the consciousness of IT departments around the world over the past few years. Sensing an opportunity to move cloud computing forward, Rackspace introduced an open source cloud computing solution, OpenStack. The move was a risky one, but now it appears to be paying off as the technology has attracted supporters from around the IT industry.

OpenStack Origins
The origins for OpenStack date back to the summer of 2010 when Rackspace Hosting and NASA teamed up to create an open source project. The first release, code named Austin and released under an Apache License, was written in Python and designed to allow any organization to create a cloud solution for their clients. The original code included components for computing, object storage and image service, with security management and a user interface to be developed later. The software was initially well-received, and after a little more than a year it has attracted a number of major players in the cloud space, including HP, Citrix, Dell and AMD. In late 2011, Rackspace handed OpenStack over to a not-for-profit organization, which will support its continued development while attracting Rackspace’s competitors to use the solution.

The Risk of OpenStack
For a company that had cloud computing pretty well figured out, launching an open source product could have some serious drawbacks. But at the time, the future of cloud computing in general was at risk as vendor lock-in prevented many organizations from fully exploring cloud options. Once they chose a provider, companies simply wouldn’t have the option of an easy migration to another service. OpenStack aimed to become an open source solution that would do for the cloud what Android did for mobile devices, essentially becoming a base on which other companies could build and innovate. Rackspace considered the risk worth it, and if its collaboration with NASA paid off, the company would position itself as an industry guide for years to come. Almost two years later, that’s exactly what happened—and now Rackspace, and the cloud computing sector in general, are reaping the benefits.

OpenStack Benefits
The major benefit of OpenStack is that organizations can build on a technology that is quickly becoming an industry standard, making it easier to fully explore cloud computing options from a variety of providers. Since OpenStack is open source, it also benefits from the culture of open source software with people viewing, updating and perfecting the code. Since industry experts from around the world are involved in the project, OpenStack is poised to become stronger and more dominant as time moves on.
While not all open source software gambles pay off, OpenStack looks like a winner for Rackspace. From being little more than an interesting piece of open source news last year, the technology has grown and gathered the attention of most of the major players in the cloud computing industry. While there will always be vendor-specific cloud options available—especially from major vendors who already have tons of support and investment in their architecture—OpenStack is on its way to becoming an industry standard. A few hurdles still stand in the way, and only time will tell if the OpenStack Foundation can properly shepherd the technology into the future. But for now, Rackspace’s experiment looks like a success.

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