Linux Blog

xrandr – Set Primary Monitor

Filed under: Linux Hardware,Linux Software,Shell Script Sundays — Owen at 11:04 pm on Sunday, October 27, 2013

I had an issue with my dual monitor setup where my primary monitor was my second, but only in X. Rearranging the monitors in Gnome preferences did nothing to solve the problem. While not exactly a shell script, here is a one-liner to change your primary monitor with xrandr.

#!/bin/bash
xrandr --output DVI-0 --primary

The above uses xrandr to set the primary to DVI-0. I put this in my ~/bin folder, chmod’d and set it to start when Gnome starts. Problem solved!

The First Unreal Engine 3 Game Ships for Linux

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:23 pm on Friday, January 25, 2013

Guest Post From Davis Miller

Score! a HUGE victory for Linux gaming in 2013! Ryan Gordon confirmed via Twitter that “Dungeon Defenders is an Unreal Engine 3 game on Linux, and it’s the first thing I’ve shipped with SDL 2.0!” The launch of Humble Indie Bundle 7 is a tower defense and action oriented role playing game that was originally designed and released for the standard PC in 2011. Though it began as a development for Unreal Engine 3, it now has a native Linux port.

unreal-engine

The reality of Linux gaming has been in question for years. Interested parties jump in, and then jump out. Plagued by technical and developmental problems, Linux gaming technology has taken nothing more than baby steps over the years. The recent strides leading up to the shipment of a Linux ported games have happened incredibly fast, with no signs of slowing in the near future. (Read on …)

Buy Vs. Build Vs. Cloud

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:31 am on Wednesday, January 23, 2013

When a company needs a piece of software there is lots of open source software available that may suit their needs. But what happens when there isn’t?
Lets take a look employee performance evaluation software (like this) for example. To build a full featured business supporting application like this is no easy task. Lets weigh in the options:

Build It
There is always the option to build software, depending on the complexity this option can cost a lot of money. You need to either build from scratch, use a framework or modify an existing open source project. Some corporations have the funds for hardware, a development team, system administrators and support team. Those that dont are pretty much left with the buy or cloud solutions.

Buy it
If building isn’t an option due to cost another is to buy. Software support and hardware are sometimes additional costs buying is a viable option depending on the application. What is often the case for small to medium sized companies, a piece software will not feature what they need, while having 90% of everything else. This can lead to leaving critical business functions out, or even a hodgepodge of multiple versions of software that do the same thing.

Cloud / hosted solitions.
For certain applications “heading to the cloud” can be a smart way to go. Not having in house hardware to inventory and maintain is one benefit, and access from multiple locations is another. With the vendors providing support. One concern is security, although this is the same with tbe build/buy options that is often overlooked.

While off the shelf products may exist there are still expenses where choosing the hosted solution may turn out more cost effective.

The top 3 widely used open source accounting applications

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, December 19, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne

There many excellent options for open source accounting software which cover basically anything from ledger bookkeeping to report and forecasting. However, you must know that having an accounting software does not turn you into an accountant and you still need a basic grounding of the fundamentals of accounting and bookkeeping. However, these accounting software applications are a decent mix of old school accounting merged with ERP that helps you to understand where your business is going and what needs to be improved or fixed. Hit the jump for the top three picks for open source accounting software (Read on …)

AutoSSH

Filed under: Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:15 am on Friday, December 14, 2012

I’ve written in the past about automatically performing an action when a host comes back online. However, this post is geared towards a more permanent solution than the one time usage connection.

Introducing autossh:

Description-en: Automatically restart SSH sessions and tunnels
autossh is a program to start an instance of ssh and monitor it, restarting it
as necessary should it die or stop passing traffic. The idea is from rstunnel
(Reliable SSH Tunnel), but implemented in C. Connection monitoring is done
using a loop of port forwardings. It backs off on the rate of connection
attempts when experiencing rapid failures such as connection refused.

It is available on most distributions, and even jailbroken iPhones. Its a great utility.

If you want to use it here’s howto:

Install it:

:~$ sudo apt-get install autossh

Run it:

:~$ autossh [host]

That’s pretty much all there is to running it, although if you want to check out all of its features you should read the help file and man pages. If you want you can resume your SSH sessions without using a password, by using the no password SSH login technique.

Better System Information with inxi

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:23 am on Saturday, November 17, 2012

Better System Information with inxi
Getting system information can be a tricky task, having to gather bits a bobs of information from various places. A Friend recently sent me a link to a little script called inxi. It comes pre-installed with SolusOS, Crunchbang, Epidemic, Mint, AntiX and Arch Linux but as it is a bash script it works on a lot of other distributions. Although it is intended for use with chat applications like IRC it also works from a shell and provides an abundance of information. Installation is as easy as downloading and chmoding a file so next time you find you need some information about your hardware, rather than poking around in /proc, just fire up ./inxi -F

LINUTOP 2 Review

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:08 pm on Friday, November 9, 2012

Linutop is a company based out of Paris that specializes in small form factor energy efficient embedded type PC’s. They have  a variety of devices with no moving parts and utilize open source software based on Ubuntu for the platform. They were kind enough to send me a Linutop 2 to review.Linutop 2


(Read on …)

Play Windows Games on Linux

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:00 pm on Friday, October 26, 2012

Tonight we have a guest post from Jason Phillips about games on Linux.

Linux is a popular OS especially for servers. It is great of open interfacing, and can be extremely efficient on processing and time. It does not have a lot of the add-ons that Windows has that can bog down the system and cause a longer boot-up. The issue that a lot of people run into when they are running the Linux OS is the misconception that it is not a good platform for a lot of the popular games. Fortunately, some clever people have created a few different ways that you will allow you to download and play Windows games on your Linux OS.

Play Windows Games on Linux

Most gamers have tried to avoid the Linux OS for that feel that playing their beloved Windows games could be near impossible on the Linux system. The early reviews of Windows 8 have not been kind, and many people are reluctant to upgrade to the Windows 8 system so that has left some of the timid gamers to research how you can play Windows games on the Linux system. It is actually a rather easy process.

(Read on …)

File Cleanup Tools and Tactics

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:35 pm on Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Ok, I’ll admit it; I’m a digital hoarder. I’ve had this problem for a while where I can’t seem to delete stuff. Perhaps its files I’ve created, stuff I’ve downloaded, backups, or backups of backups but files seem to accumulate faster than I can keep up with organizing them. Throw this on top of system re-installs and, being the family geek backups of family members and freelance work to be honest, I’m a bit overwhelmed!

Well, it stops today! At least the start of organization that is. I’ve written in the past about spring cleaning tools, recursive md5sum scripts and tools like md5deep but nothing really came of it. It’s time to take action and get stuff organized. Now I’ve admitted it publicly, I’m sort of obligated to get in control of my digital life and so the voyage begins.

Stay tuned for more posts on digital organization techniques and tools!

Important Linux Distros for Beginners in 2012

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Tuesday, May 1, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne.

There is wide variety of Linux Distros in the market. Each one differs in size, design, support and layout, although the basic function is the same. Each distros offers several unique features apart from main features. There is a heavy competition among distributors to create and develop unique features. Each of these distros offers different types of support systems such as forums, live chat, and other means. That is why it is necessary to select the distributor based on your requirement.

Here is a list of Important Linux distributors for beginners in 2012.

(Read on …)

Auto mounting a partition

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:03 pm on Monday, March 26, 2012

It’s been a while. A while since I’ve had to actually had to manually edit the /etc/fstab to automount a partition. So long, that I searched my blog trying to find out how to do it. To my surprise, I’d never actually written one. If I had, I couldn’t find it. Here’s to you, memory:

According to /etc/fstab this is how it’s done

# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

For those of us that are human, that can mean very little. What you can do, in hopefully slightly more understandable terms is add a line that looks like this:

/dev/sd[a|b|c][x] /mnt/[location] [filesystem] defaults 0 0

What that looks like in my case is:

/dev/sda5 /mnt/sda5 ext4 defaults 0 0

Save, exit and reboot. Hope for the best :)

Disclaimer – I did manage to find the man page for fstab while searching!

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