Linux Blog

Packages you should install from the get-go

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:45 pm on Wednesday, December 28, 2011

When re-installing or performing a fresh installs of Linux, I’ve found that packages often disappear from default installations. These are the tools I install from the get-go. I’m sure there is more that I’m missing, next time I re-install I’ll update the list. Feel free to contribute your favorites to the list in the comments!

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THREE POPULAR OPEN SOURCE VERSION CONTROL SYSTEMS

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:30 am on Friday, December 23, 2011

Below, I review CVS, Subversion, and GIT; three popular open source version control systems. Version control systems are an organizational necessity for any software development project. During the software development process, multiple developers are often working with varying versions of the same code. One version may have a particular bug, while another version may have a particular feature. Essentially, a development team begins developing code, creating the first version. From that original trunk, there are various branches where the same versions of the code may be worked on at the same time, perhaps one team working on one particular bug, while another team works on a different one. Once changes are made, they are then committed back to the repository, the repository being where all past and current versions of the code is kept. Keeping track of which version has what is an incredibly important part of the process that allows developers to track bugs, implement new features, and keep the project moving forward. (Read on …)

Linux Apps That Will Help You Graduate College

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:12 am on Monday, August 1, 2011

This is the second guest post written by Whitney from Technected. Whitney majored in journalism and has been using Linux ever since. She now works for a large automotive corporation in the Midwest. In her spare time she enjoys playing video games, gardening and watching Dr. Who.

Linux is a very powerful OS, many people don’t know that. With all the mainstream programs that Microsoft creates, most people remain ignorant of the awesome programs out there for free that are being produced by Linux developers. Many of the apps out there can help you reach your traditional or online degree. Below is a list of 5 that will help you graduate college.

Task Juggler is a project management program. It allows you to keep all your tasks in order. All you have to do is enter in the assignment for class and when it is due as well as any other details that you may find pertinent to getting the project done. It’s especially helpful for online university students, who have less structured classes.

Every college course will have a syllabus and on the syllabus will be assignments that need to be accomplished. Task Juggler can organize this information and keep you on track with your assignments.

Star Office or Oracle Open Office is a regular word program that offers spreadsheet, presentation, drawing, database and formula programs. It is a mirror of Microsoft office but with an original drawing program.

What makes Star Office better than Microsoft Office is its ability to open multiple file types. It can open Microsoft office files as well as Corel WordPerfect files, TXT and HTM. This program may not have the same popularity of Microsoft, but it is free. When having to pay up to $150 on a college budget, Star Office really saves the day.

LyX is a document program that can make several different types of documents. With it, you can make word documents, math documents, science document and many others. This program specifically focuses on the structure of the documents and allows for any type of structure whether it is for a math assignment sheet or a block paragraph science paper.

Obviously you can utilize this program for any class and it beats having to go to the library and using a very specific program. Instead you can download LyX and get all your documents done in one program.

Free Mind is a program that helps you make notes. It is a digital version of the old spider web note taking that many students use for various subjects in school. The main idea rests in the center and then sub topics sprout off of that and then points link off of those.

Another nice point in Free Mind is its ability to fold these sub topics and point back into the main topic, giving Free Mind the ability to reduce clutter. The application allows students to flesh out their ideas for all the papers they will write for class.

Speed Crunch is a powerful desktop calculator that can calculate advanced equations. This isn’t your sissy desktop calculator. This calculator comes with a large screen where you can input long equations as well as define variables for the calculator to produce the correct answer.

For instance, y = x + 41. Enter x = 18 and the calculator does the rest. Speed Crunch has many other useful aspects including syntax highlighting and automatic completion, both will help in reducing errors.

These five Linux applications are great resources for college students or graduates. It’s unfortunate that many out there still don’t realize the abundant, free programs out there that can help them in their daily life, and even help them graduate and better their future.

Open Source Tuning with RomRaider

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, June 22, 2011

RomRaider
This post features RomRaider, an open source software that is used for tuning. Not tuning or optimization in the traditional sense like optimizing shell scripts, but rather automotive tuning, specifically for Subaru’s.

It supports a lot of Subaru models and is able to tune supported ECU’s from various countries.

If you like living on the edge and can get over the risks it would totally be worth it. The consequences may not be for the faint hearted though:

  • An unreadable/unusable ECU.
  • A blown motor and its subsequent damage.
  • Unexpected behavior on the road or track that may cause injury or death to the user as well as others.
  • Violation of local and/or federal laws due to the modification of the factory ECU.

RomRaider is written in Java and is cross platform (Windows/Linux) Sorry Subaru driving Mac owners, you get no love. The interface, although clunky (I mean, it is Java after all) has some pretty cool graphs that display various information in a visually appealing format. If you own a Subaru and are interested in tuning, I’d give RomRaider serious consideration before other commercial solutions.

Easy Keyboard & Mouse Sharing with QuickSynergy

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, April 6, 2011

I’ve written before about using one computers keyboard and mouse across multiple computers by using x2vnc and x2x, there is however another tool called Synergy. I never really messed around with it because of x2x and x2vnc but it is a valuable tool worth mentioning. QuickSynergy is available in most repositories that is a handy little tool to get your computers set up using Synergy and as the name suggests; quickly. If you apt-yum-get-fu it it will install all your dependencies for you and make setup a breeze.

Take a look at the screenshots:
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Reverse Proxy with ModProxy

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:30 am on Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Reverse Proxy with Mod Proxy

Mod proxy is a versatile module for apache that has many uses. One of its many uses is the reverse proxy feature. Lets say you have multiple web servers behind a router and want to give the outside world access to each server. Your router can only open port 80 for one host, but with modproxy you can direct users to different servers depending on which sub domain or directory they are requesting. This also works for external sites that may not be on your private network.

Hit the jump to see how.

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PulseCaster

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, January 26, 2011

pulsecasterI stumbled upon PulseCaster while searching through Fedoras repositories, I was intrigued and had to give it a try. By the website this is the description:
“PulseCaster is a simple PulseAudio-based tool for making podcast interviews. It is designed for ease of use and simplicity. The user makes a call with a preferred PulseAudio-compatible Voice-over-IP (VoIP) softphone application such as Ekiga or Twinkle, and then starts PulseCaster to record the conversation to a multimedia file. The resulting file can be published as a podcast or distributed in other ways.”
It works really well for phone interviews or just recording that call you want to remember. I wouldn’t advise recording conversations without the other parties permission. I don’t know what the law is on that, but if you’re using it for its intended purpose (podcasting) then it serves its purpose. I actually used it to record the Asterisk Area Code Lookup Script.

Setting up a VPN with pptpd

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:00 am on Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Setting up a VPN with pptpd One of the things that was on my whiteboard for some time was to set up a VPN for home use. Sure, I can do some remote SSH port forwarding, use ssh as a proxy or perhaps even use some Linux Tunneling Techniques but they’re not quite the same as a full blown VPN. You can use the VPN for access to remote services, to secure communications on untrusted networks or use it for mobile devices. Whatever your use its easy to set a VPN up with pptpd that can be used with your mobile and remote devices. (Read on …)

The root for the previously installed system was not found – Fedora

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:30 am on Wednesday, January 12, 2011

The root for the previously installed system was not found
I was having an issue with a preupgrade of Fedora, somehow an old package that was no longer in use decided it was going to cause the installation to fail. After rebooting, finding the guilty package and removing it I started the upgrade again. This is where the error message “The root for the previously installed system was not found” occurred.

I did some research, tried mounting the file system then upgrading that way and still nothing.

According to this Fedora Forums post other people have experienced this issue. In cagonto1980′s post it explains the workaround:
Mount the filesystem, vi /mnt/sysimage/etc/fedora-release and change the release to the previous version. You may need to remember the version, mine was set to “Fedora 13 (Goddard)” and I changed it to “Fedora 12 (Constantine)”. After rebooting it started the upgrade. It appears the issue is Anaconda updates the release file and doesn’t change it back if the installation fails causing the next upgrade to think that the newest version is installed.

Thanks to cagonto1980 for the workaround.

Softphones for Linux

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:00 am on Wednesday, December 29, 2010

softphones for linuxHello readers! This post is a list of soft phones available for Linux. It is not an all inclusive list, more of a list of those I’ve installed or tested. These are just a handful of them, there are probable way more available that I’m not aware of. Some of these are cross platform and are listed if they are available in Ubuntu and Fedora’s repositories as of the time of this writing. Use the comments to let me know of any good ones or which ones you’ve used or recommend!

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The Gimp Tutorials

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 am on Thursday, December 2, 2010

gimp tutorialsI’ll start off saying I’m graphically challenged, well more like anything visually related, I’m so bad I can’t even match my clothes properly. If you have you seen my work (check out the Free DVD Ripper Software post for a classic example) this should be obvious. I do however do all of my own stunts graphics . I remember when I used to work with a bunch of Photoshop Guru’s, they could do pretty much anything with Photoshop. They were deadly, I once saw them take a picture of our co-workers and shop it so that they were kissing other people. Apart from the system administrators these are the people I’d be least likely to pull a prank on, these guys were just pure dangerous. When I asked them how they learned to ‘shop the most common response was not from school but from the web. They pointed me to some good resources that they use to pull off certain things.

So The Gimp is everyone’s favorite open source image editing software right? Well, here are some similar websites to those mentioned above.

http://gimp-tutorials.net/

http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/

http://www.gimp-tutorials.com/

With these sites and a some time you’ll be a master like much better than me and I’ve spent hours on this stuff. You do have to admit though, my shop’n skills have got better as time has passed I some how managed to make all of these graphics Freemind Vs. Kdissert, Linux Server Monitoring, Thunderbird localmail spool and Linux Backup Utility Roundtable

http://www.thelinuxblog.com/thunderbird-localmail-spool/http://www.thelinuxblog.com/thunderbird-localmail-spool/ lo
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