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WIRESHARK

Section: The Wireshark Network Analyzer (1)
Updated: 2007-02-03
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NAME

wireshark - Interactively dump and analyze network traffic  

SYNOPSYS

wireshark-a <capture autostop condition> ] ... [ -b <capture ring buffer option> ] ... [ -B <capture buffer size (Win32 only)> ]  [ -c <capture packet count> ] [ -D ] [ --display=<X display to use> ]  [ -f <capture filter> ] [ -g <packet number> ] [ -h ] [ -H ] [ -i <capture interface>|- ] [ -k ] [ -l ] [ -L ] [ -m <font> ] [ -n ] [ -N <name resolving flags> ]  [ -o <preference/recent setting> ] ... [ -p ] [ -Q ] [ -r <infile> ] [ -R <read (display) filter> ] [ -S ] [ -s <capture snaplen> ] [ -t ad|a|r|d|e ] [ -v ] [ -w <outfile> ] [ -y <capture link type> ] [ -X <eXtension option> ] [ -z <statistics> ] [ <infile> ]  

DESCRIPTION

Wireshark is a GUI network protocol analyzer. It lets you interactively browse packet data from a live network or from a previously saved capture file. Wireshark's native capture file format is libpcap format, which is also the format used by tcpdump and various other tools.

Wireshark can read / import the following file formats:

* libpcap, tcpdump and various other tools using tcpdump's capture format
* snoop and atmsnoop
* Shomiti/Finisar Surveyor captures
* Novell LANalyzer captures
* Microsoft Network Monitor captures
* AIX's iptrace captures
* Cinco Networks NetXRay captures
* Network Associates Windows-based Sniffer captures
* Network General/Network Associates DOS-based Sniffer (compressed or uncompressed) captures
* AG Group/WildPackets EtherPeek/TokenPeek/AiroPeek/EtherHelp/PacketGrabber captures
* RADCOM's WAN/LAN analyzer captures
* Network Instruments Observer version 9 captures
* Lucent/Ascend router debug output
* files from HP-UX's nettl
* Toshiba's ISDN routers dump output
* the output from i4btrace from the ISDN4BSD project
* traces from the EyeSDN USB S0.
* the output in IPLog format from the Cisco Secure Intrusion Detection System
* pppd logs (pppdump format)
* the output from VMS's TCPIPtrace/TCPtrace/UCX$TRACE utilities
* the text output from the DBS Etherwatch VMS utility
* Visual Networks' Visual UpTime traffic capture
* the output from CoSine L2 debug
* the output from Accellent's 5Views LAN agents
* Endace Measurement Systems' ERF format captures
* Linux Bluez Bluetooth stack hcidump -w traces
* Catapult DCT2000 .out files

There is no need to tell Wireshark what type of file you are reading; it will determine the file type by itself. Wireshark is also capable of reading any of these file formats if they are compressed using gzip. Wireshark recognizes this directly from the file; the '.gz' extension is not required for this purpose.

Like other protocol analyzers, Wireshark's main window shows 3 views of a packet. It shows a summary line, briefly describing what the packet is. A packet details display is shown, allowing you to drill down to exact protocol or field that you interested in. Finally, a hex dump shows you exactly what the packet looks like when it goes over the wire.

In addition, Wireshark has some features that make it unique. It can assemble all the packets in a TCP conversation and show you the ASCII (or EBCDIC, or hex) data in that conversation. Display filters in Wireshark are very powerful; more fields are filterable in Wireshark than in other protocol analyzers, and the syntax you can use to create your filters is richer. As Wireshark progresses, expect more and more protocol fields to be allowed in display filters.

Packet capturing is performed with the pcap library. The capture filter syntax follows the rules of the pcap library. This syntax is different from the display filter syntax.

Compressed file support uses (and therefore requires) the zlib library. If the zlib library is not present, Wireshark will compile, but will be unable to read compressed files.

The pathname of a capture file to be read can be specified with the -r option or can be specified as a command-line argument.  

OPTIONS

Most users will want to start Wireshark without options and configure it from the menus instead. Those users may just skip this section.
-a <capture autostop condition>
Specify a criterion that specifies when Wireshark is to stop writing to a capture file. The criterion is of the form test:value, where test is one of:

duration:value Stop writing to a capture file after value seconds have elapsed.

filesize:value Stop writing to a capture file after it reaches a size of value kilobytes (where a kilobyte is 1024 bytes). If this option is used together with the -b option, Wireshark will stop writing to the current capture file and switch to the next one if filesize is reached.

files:value Stop writing to capture files after value number of files were written.

-b <capture ring buffer option>
Cause Wireshark to run in ``multiple files'' mode. In ``multiple files'' mode, Wireshark will write to several capture files. When the first capture file fills up, Wireshark will switch writing to the next file and so on.

The created filenames are based on the filename given with the -w flag, the number of the file and on the creation date and time, e.g. outfile_00001_20050604120117.pcap, outfile_00001_20050604120523.pcap, ...

With the files option it's also possible to form a ``ring buffer''. This will fill up new files until the number of files specified, at which point Wireshark will discard the data in the first file and start writing to that file and so on. If the files option is not set, new files filled up until one of the capture stop conditions match (or until the disk if full).

The criterion is of the form key:value, where key is one of:

duration:value switch to the next file after value seconds have elapsed, even if the current file is not completely filled up.

filesize:value switch to the next file after it reaches a size of value kilobytes (where a kilobyte is 1024 bytes).

files:value begin again with the first file after value number of files were written (form a ring buffer).

-B <capture buffer size (Win32 only)>
Win32 only: set capture buffer size (in MB, default is 1MB). This is used by the the capture driver to buffer packet data until that data can be written to disk. If you encounter packet drops while capturing, try to increase this size.
-c <capture packet count>
Set the maximum number of packets to read when capturing live data.
-D
Print a list of the interfaces on which Wireshark can capture, and exit. For each network interface, a number and an interface name, possibly followed by a text description of the interface, is printed. The interface name or the number can be supplied to the -i flag to specify an interface on which to capture.

This can be useful on systems that don't have a command to list them (e.g., Windows systems, or UNIX systems lacking ifconfig -a); the number can be useful on Windows 2000 and later systems, where the interface name is a somewhat complex string.

Note that ``can capture'' means that Wireshark was able to open that device to do a live capture; if, on your system, a program doing a network capture must be run from an account with special privileges (for example, as root), then, if Wireshark is run with the -D flag and is not run from such an account, it will not list any interfaces.

--display=<X display to use>
Specifies the X display to use. A hostname and screen (otherhost:0.0) or just a screen (:0.0) can be specified. This option is not available under Windows.
-f <capture filter>
Set the capture filter expression.
-g <packet number>
After reading in a capture file using the -r flag, go to the given packet number.
-h
Print the version and options and exit.
-H
Hide the capture info dialog during live packet capture.
-i <capture interface>|-
Set the name of the network interface or pipe to use for live packet capture.

Network interface names should match one of the names listed in "wireshark -D`` (described above); a number, as reported by ''wireshark -D``, can also be used. If you're using UNIX, ''netstat -i`` or ''ifconfig -a" might also work to list interface names, although not all versions of UNIX support the -a flag to ifconfig.

If no interface is specified, Wireshark searches the list of interfaces, choosing the first non-loopback interface if there are any non-loopback interfaces, and choosing the first loopback interface if there are no non-loopback interfaces. If there are no interfaces at all, Wireshark reports an error and doesn't start the capture.

Pipe names should be either the name of a FIFO (named pipe) or ``-'' to read data from the standard input. Data read from pipes must be in standard libpcap format.

Note: the Win32 version of Wireshark doesn't support capturing from pipes or stdin!

-k
Start the capture session immediately. If the -i flag was specified, the capture uses the specified interface. Otherwise, Wireshark searches the list of interfaces, choosing the first non-loopback interface if there are any non-loopback interfaces, and choosing the first loopback interface if there are no non-loopback interfaces; if there are no interfaces, Wireshark reports an error and doesn't start the capture.
-l
Turn on automatic scrolling if the packet display is being updated automatically as packets arrive during a capture (as specified by the -S flag).
-L
List the data link types supported by the interface and exit.
-m <font>
Set the name of the font used by Wireshark for most text. Wireshark will construct the name of the bold font used for the data in the byte view pane that corresponds to the field selected in the packet details pane from the name of the main text font.
-n
Disable network object name resolution (such as hostname, TCP and UDP port names), the -N flag might override this one.
-N <name resolving flags>
Turn on name resolving only for particular types of addresses and port numbers, with name resolving for other types of addresses and port numbers turned off. This flag overrides -n if both -N and -n are present. If both -N and -n flags are not present, all name resolutions are turned on.

The argument is a string that may contain the letters:

m to enable MAC address resolution

n to enable network address resolution

t to enable transport-layer port number resolution

C to enable concurrent (asynchronous) DNS lookups

-o <preference/recent setting>
Set a preference or recent value, overriding the default value and any value read from a preference/recent file. The argument to the flag is a string of the form prefname:value, where prefname is the name of the preference/recent value (which is the same name that would appear in the preference/recent file), and value is the value to which it should be set. Since Wireshark 0.10.12, the recent settings replaces the formerly used -B, -P and -T flags to manipulate the GUI dimensions.
-p
Don't put the interface into promiscuous mode. Note that the interface might be in promiscuous mode for some other reason; hence, -p cannot be used to ensure that the only traffic that is captured is traffic sent to or from the machine on which Wireshark is running, broadcast traffic, and multicast traffic to addresses received by that machine.
-Q
Cause Wireshark to exit after the end of capture session (useful in batch mode with -c option for instance); this option requires the -i and -w parameters.
-r <infile>
Read packet data from infile, can be any supported capture file format (including gzipped files). It's not possible to use named pipes or stdin here!
-R <read (display) filter>
When reading a capture file specified with the -r flag, causes the specified filter (which uses the syntax of display filters, rather than that of capture filters) to be applied to all packets read from the capture file; packets not matching the filter are discarded.
-S
Automatically update the packet display as packets are coming in.
-s <capture snaplen>
Set the default snapshot length to use when capturing live data. No more than snaplen bytes of each network packet will be read into memory, or saved to disk.
-t ad|a|r|d|e
Set the format of the packet timestamp displayed in the packet list window, the default is relative. The format can be one of:

ad absolute with date: The absolute date and time is the actual time and date the packet was captured

a absolute: The absolute time is the actual time the packet was captured, with no date displayed

r relative: The relative time is the time elapsed between the first packet and the current packet

d delta: The delta time is the time since the previous packet was captured

e epoch: The time in seconds since epoch (Jan 1, 1970 00:00:00)

-v
Print the version and exit.
-w <outfile>
Set the default capture file name.
-y <capture link type>
If a capture is started from the command line with -k, set the data link type to use while capturing packets. The values reported by -L are the values that can be used.
-X <eXtension options>
Specify an option to be passed to an Wireshark module. The eXtension option is in the form extension_key:value, where extension_key can be:

lua_script:lua_script_filename tells Wireshark to load the given script in addition to the default Lua scripts.

-z <statistics>
Get Wireshark to collect various types of statistics and display the result in a window that updates in semi-real time. Currently implemented statistics are:

-z dcerpc,srt,uuid,major.minor[,filter]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for DCERPC interface uuid, version major.minor. Data collected is number of calls for each procedure, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z dcerpc,srt,12345778-1234-abcd-ef00-0123456789ac,1.0 to collect data for CIFS SAMR Interface. This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z dcerpc,srt,12345778-1234-abcd-ef00-0123456789ac,1.0,ip.addr==1.2.3.4 to collect SAMR SRT statistics for a specific host.

-z io,stat

Collect packet/bytes statistics for the capture in intervals of 1 seconds. This option will open a window with up to 5 color-coded graphs where number-of-packets-per-second or number-of-bytes-per-second statistics can be calculated and displayed.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

This graph window can also be opened from the Analyze:Statistics:Traffic:IO-Stat menu item.

-z rpc,srt,program,version[,<filter>]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for program/version. Data collected is number of calls for each procedure, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z rpc,srt,100003,3 to collect data for NFS v3. This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filter string is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z rpc,srt,100003,3,nfs.fh.hash==0x12345678 to collect NFS v3 SRT statistics for a specific file.

-z rpc,programs

Collect call/reply RTT data for all known ONC-RPC programs/versions. Data collected is number of calls for each protocol/version, MinRTT, MaxRTT and AvgRTT.

-z scsi,srt,cmdset[,<filter>]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for SCSI commandset <cmdset>.

Commandsets are 0:SBC 1:SSC 5:MMC

Data collected is number of calls for each procedure, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z scsi,srt,0 to collect data for SCSI BLOCK COMMANDS (SBC). This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filter string is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z scsi,srt,0,ip.addr==1.2.3.4 to collect SCSI SBC SRT statistics for a specific iscsi/ifcp/fcip host.

-z smb,srt[,filter]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for SMB. Data collected is number of calls for each SMB command, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z smb,srt.

The data will be presented as separate tables for all normal SMB commands, all Transaction2 commands and all NT Transaction commands. Only those commands that are seen in the capture will have its stats displayed. Only the first command in a xAndX command chain will be used in the calculation. So for common SessionSetupAndX + TreeConnectAndX chains, only the SessionSetupAndX call will be used in the statistics. This is a flaw that might be fixed in the future.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``smb,srt,ip.addr==1.2.3.4'' to only collect stats for SMB packets echanged by the host at IP address 1.2.3.4 .

-z fc,srt[,filter]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for FC. Data collected is number of calls for each Fibre Channel command, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z fc,srt. The Service Response Time is calculated as the time delta between the First packet of the exchange and the Last packet of the exchange.

The data will be presented as separate tables for all normal FC commands, Only those commands that are seen in the capture will have its stats displayed.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``fc,srt,fc.id==01.02.03'' to only collect stats for FC packets echanged by the host at FC address 01.02.03 .

-z ldap,srt[,filter]

Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for LDAP. Data collected is number of calls for each implemented LDAP command, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT. Example: use -z ldap,srt. The Service Response Time is calculated as the time delta between the Request and the Response.

The data will be presented as separate tables for all implemented LDAP commands, Only those commands that are seen in the capture will have its stats displayed.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``ldap,srt,ip.addr==10.1.1.1'' to only collect stats for LDAP packets echanged by the host at IP address 10.1.1.1 .

The only LDAP command that are currently implemented and the stats will be available for are: BIND SEARCH MODIFY ADD DELETE MODRDN COMPARE EXTENDED

-z mgcp,srt[,filter]

Collect requests/response SRT (Service Response Time) data for MGCP. This is similar to -z smb,srt). Data collected is number of calls for each known MGCP Type, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT and Average SRT. Example: use -z mgcp,srt.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``mgcp,srt,ip.addr==1.2.3.4'' to only collect stats for MGCP packets exchanged by the host at IP address 1.2.3.4 .

-z conv,type[,filter]

Create a table that lists all conversations that could be seen in the capture. type specifies for which type of conversation we want to generate the statistics; currently the supported ones are

  "eth"   Ethernet
  "fc"    Fibre Channel addresses
  "fddi"  FDDI addresses
  "ip"    IP addresses
  "ipx"   IPX addresses
  "tcp"   TCP/IP socket pairs   Both IPv4 and IPv6 are supported
  "tr"    TokenRing
  "udp"   UDP/IP socket pairs   Both IPv4 and IPv6 are supported

If the optional filter string is specified, only those packets that match the filter will be used in the calculations.

The table is presented with one line for each conversation and displays number of packets/bytes in each direction as well as total number of packets/bytes. By default, the table is sorted according to total number of packets.

These tables can also be generated at runtime by selecting the appropriate conversation type from the menu ``Tools/Statistics/Conversation List/''.

-z h225,counter[,filter]

Count ITU-T H.225 messages and their reasons. In the first column you get a list of H.225 messages and H.225 message reasons, which occur in the current capture file. The number of occurences of each message or reason is displayed in the second column.

Example: use -z h225,counter.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``h225,counter,ip.addr==1.2.3.4'' to only collect stats for H.225 packets exchanged by the host at IP address 1.2.3.4 .

-z h225,srt[,filter]

Collect requests/response SRT (Service Response Time) data for ITU-T H.225 RAS. Data collected is number of calls of each ITU-T H.225 RAS Message Type, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT, Average SRT, Minimum in Packet, and Maximum in Packet. You will also get the number of Open Requests (Unresponded Requests), Discarded Responses (Responses without matching request) and Duplicate Messages. Example: use -z h225,srt.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filterstring is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``h225,srt,ip.addr==1.2.3.4'' to only collect stats for ITU-T H.225 RAS packets exchanged by the host at IP address 1.2.3.4 .

-z sip,stat[,filter]

This option will activate a counter for SIP messages. You will get the number of occurences of each SIP Method and of each SIP Status-Code. Additionally you also get the number of resent SIP Messages (only for SIP over UDP).

Example: use -z sip,stat.

This option can be used multiple times on the command line.

If the optional filter string is provided, the stats will only be calculated on those calls that match that filter. Example: use -z ``sip,stat,ip.addr==1.2.3.4'' to only collect stats for SIP packets exchanged by the host at IP address 1.2.3.4 .

 

INTERFACE

 

MENU ITEMS

File:Open
File:Open Recent
File:Close
Open or close a capture file. The File:Open dialog box allows a filter to be specified; when the capture file is read, the filter is applied to all packets read from the file, and packets not matching the filter are discarded. The File:Open Recent is a submenu and will show a list of previously opened files.
File:Merge
Merge another capture file to the currently loaded one. The File:Merge dialog box allows the merge ``Prepended'', ``Chronologically'' or ``Appended'', relative to the already loaded one.
File:Save
File:Save As
Save the current capture, or the packets currently displayed from that capture, to a file. Check boxes let you select whether to save all packets, or just those that have passed the current display filter and/or those that are currently marked, and an option menu lets you select (from a list of file formats in which at particular capture, or the packets currently displayed from that capture, can be saved), a file format in which to save it.
File:File Set:List Files
Show a dialog box that list all files of the file set matching the currently loaded file. A file set is a compound of files resulting from a capture using the ``multiple files'' / ``ringbuffer'' mode, recognizable by the filename pattern, e.g.: Filename_00001_20050604101530.pcap.
File:File Set:Next File
File:File Set:Previous File
If the currently loaded file is part of a file set (see above), open the next / previous file in that set.
File:Export
Export captured data into an external format. Note: the data cannot be imported back into Wireshark, so be sure to keep the capture file.
File:Print
Print packet data from the current capture. You can select the range of packets to be printed (which packets are printed), and the output format of each packet (how each packet is printed). The output format will be similar to the displayed values, so a summary line, the packet details view, and/or the hex dump of the packet can be printed.

Printing options can be set with the Edit:Preferences menu item, or in the dialog box popped up by this menu item.

File:Quit
Exit the application.
Edit:Find Packet
Search forward or backward, starting with the currently selected packet (or the most recently selected packet, if no packet is selected). Search criteria can be a display filter expression, a string of hexadecimal digits, or a text string.

When searching for a text string, you can search the packet data, or you can search the text in the Info column in the packet list pane or in the packet details pane.

Hexadecimal digits can be separated by colons, periods, or dashes. Text string searches can be ASCII or Unicode (or both), and may be case insensitive.

Edit:Find Next
Edit:Find Previous
Search forward / backward for a packet matching the filter from the previous search, starting with the currently selected packet (or the most recently selected packet, if no packet is selected).
Edit:Time Reference:Set Time Reference (toggle)
Set (or unset if currently set) the selected packet as a Time Reference packet. When a packet is set as a Time Reference packet, the timestamps in the packet list pane will be replaced with the string ``*REF*''. The relative time timestamp in later packets will then be calculated relative to the timestamp of this Time Reference packet and not the first packet in the capture.

Packets that have been selected as Time Reference packets will always be displayed in the packet list pane. Display filters will not affect or hide these packets.

If there is a column displayed for ``Culmulative Bytes'' this counter will be reset at every Time Reference packet.

Edit:Time Reference:Find Next
Edit:Time Reference:Find Previous
Search forward / backward for a time referenced packet.
Edit:Mark Packet (toggle)
Mark (or unmark if currently marked) the selected packet. The field ``frame.marked'' is set for packets that are marked, so that, for example, a display filters can be used to display only marked packets, and so that the Edit:Find Packet dialog can be used to find the next or previous marked packet.
Edit:Mark All Packets
Edit:Unmark All Packets
Mark / Unmark all packets that are currently displayed.
Edit:Preferences
Set the GUI, capture, printing and protocol options (see Preferences dialog below).
View:Main Toolbar
View:Filter Toolbar
View:Statusbar
Show or hide the main window controls.
View:Packet List
View:Packet Details
View:Packet Bytes
Show or hide the main window panes.
View:Time Display Format
Set the format of the packet timestamp displayed in the packet list window.
View:Name Resolution:Resolve Name
Try to resolve a name for the currently seleted item.
View:Name Resolution:Enable for ... Layer
Enable or disable translation of addresses to names in the display.
View:Colorize Packet List
Enable or disable the coloring rules. Disabling will improve performance.
View:Auto Scroll in Live Capture
Enable or disable the automatic scrolling of the packet list while a live capture is in progress.
View:Zoom In
View:Zoom Out
Zoom into / out of the main window data (by changing the font size).
View:Normal Size
Reset the zoom factor of zoom in / zoom out back to normal font size.
View:Resize All Columns
Resize all columns to best fit the current packet display.
View:Expand Subtrees
Expands the currently selected item and it's subtrees in the packet details.
View:Expand All
View:Collapse All
Expand / Collapse all branches of the packet details.
View:Coloring Rules
Change the foreground and background colors of the packet information in the list of packets, based upon display filters. The list of display filters is applied to each packet sequentially. After the first display filter matches a packet, any additional display filters in the list are ignored. Therefore, if you are filtering on the existence of protocols, you should list the higher-level protocols first, and the lower-level protocols last.
How Colorization Works
Packets are colored according to a list of color filters. Each filter consists of a name, a filter expression and a coloration. A packet is colored according to the first filter that it matches. Color filter expressions use exactly the same syntax as display filter expressions.

When Wireshark starts, the color filters are loaded from:

1. The user's personal color filters file or, if that does not exist,

2. The global color filters file.

If neither of these exist then the packets will not be colored.

View:Show Packet In New Window
Create a new window containing a packet details view and a hex dump window of the currently selected packet; this window will continue to display that packet's details and data even if another packet is selected.
View:Reload
Reload a capture file. Same as File:Close and File:Open the same file again.
Go:Back
Go back in previously visited packets history.
Go:Forward
Go forward in previously visited packets history.
Go:Go To Packet
Go to a particular numbered packet.
Go:Go To Corresponding Packet
If a field in the packet details pane containing a packet number is selected, go to the packet number specified by that field. (This works only if the dissector that put that entry into the packet details put it into the details as a filterable field rather than just as text.) This can be used, for example, to go to the packet for the request corresponding to a reply, or the reply corresponding to a request, if that packet number has been put into the packet details.
Go:First Packet
Go:Last Packet
Go to the first / last packet in the capture.
Capture:Interfaces
Shows a dialog box with all currently known interfaces and displaying the current network traffic amount. Capture sessions can be started from here. Beware: keeping this box open results in high system load!
Capture:Options
Initiate a live packet capture (see Capture Options dialog below). If no filename is specified, a temporary file will be created to hold the capture. The location of the file can be chosen by setting your TMPDIR environment variable before starting Wireshark. Otherwise, the default TMPDIR location is system-dependent, but is likely either /var/tmp or /tmp.
Capture:Start
Start a live packet capture with the previously seleted options. This won't open the options dialog box, and can be convenient for repeatingly capturing with the same options.
Capture:Stop
Stop a running live capture.
Capture:Restart
While a live capture is running, stop it and restart with the same options again. This can be convenient to remove unrelevant packets, if no valuable packets were captured so far.
Capture:Capture Filters
Edit the saved list of capture filters, allowing filters to be added, changed, or deleted.
Analyze:Display Filters
Edit the saved list of display filters, allowing filters to be added, changed, or deleted.
Analyze:Apply as Filter
Create a display filter, or add to the display filter strip at the bottom, a display filter based on the data currently highlighted in the packe details, and apply the filter.

If that data is a field that can be tested in a display filter expression, the display filter will test that field; otherwise, the display filter will be based on absolute offset within the packet, and so could be unreliable if the packet contains protocols with variable-length headers, such as a source-routed token-ring packet.

The Selected option creates a display filter that tests for a match of the data; the Not Selected option creates a display filter that tests for a non-match of the data. The And Selected, Or Selected, And Not Selected, and Or Not Selected options add to the end of the display filter in the strip at the bottom an AND or OR operator followed by the new display filter expression.

Analyze:Prepare a Filter
Create a display filter, or add to the display filter strip at the bottom, a display filter based on the data currently highlighted in the packet details, but don't apply the filter.
Analyze:Enabled Protocols
Allow protocol dissection to be enabled or disabled for a specific protocol. Individual protocols can be enabled or disabled by clicking on them in the list or by highlighting them and pressing the space bar. The entire list can be enabled, disabled, or inverted using the buttons below the list.

When a protocol is disabled, dissection in a particular packet stops when that protocol is reached, and Wireshark moves on to the next packet. Any higher-layer protocols that would otherwise have been processed will not be displayed. For example, disabling TCP will prevent the dissection and display of TCP, HTTP, SMTP, Telnet, and any other protocol exclusively dependent on TCP.

The list of protocols can be saved, so that Wireshark will start up with the protocols in that list disabled.

Analyze:Decode As
If you have a packet selected, present a dialog allowing you to change which dissectors are used to decode this packet. The dialog has one panel each for the link layer, network layer and transport layer protocol/port numbers, and will allow each of these to be changed independently. For example, if the selected packet is a TCP packet to port 12345, using this dialog you can instruct Wireshark to decode all packets to or from that TCP port as HTTP packets.
Analyze:User Specified Decodes
Create a new window showing whether any protocol ID to dissector mappings have been changed by the user. This window also allows the user to reset all decodes to their default values.
Analyze:Follow TCP Stream
If you have a TCP packet selected, display the contents of the data stream for the TCP connection to which that packet belongs, as text, in a separate window, and leave the list of packets in a filtered state, with only those packets that are part of that TCP connection being displayed. You can revert to your old view by pressing ENTER in the display filter text box, thereby invoking your old display filter (or resetting it back to no display filter).

The window in which the data stream is displayed lets you select:

*
whether to display the entire conversation, or one or the other side of it;
*
whether the data being displayed is to be treated as ASCII or EBCDIC text or as raw hex data;

and lets you print what's currently being displayed, using the same print options that are used for the File:Print Packet menu item, or save it as text to a file.

Statistics:Summary
Show summary information about the capture, including elapsed time, packet counts, byte counts, and the like. If a display filter is in effect, summary information will be shown about the capture and about the packets currently being displayed.
Statistics:Protocol Hierarchy
Show the number of packets, and the number of bytes in those packets, for each protocol in the trace. It organizes the protocols in the same hierarchy in which they were found in the trace. Besides counting the packets in which the protocol exists, a count is also made for packets in which the protocol is the last protocol in the stack. These last-protocol counts show you how many packets (and the byte count associated with those packets) ended in a particular protocol. In the table, they are listed under ``End Packets'' and ``End Bytes''.
Statistics:IO Graphs
Open a window where up to 5 graphs in different colors can be displayed to indicate number of packets or number of bytes per second for all packets matching the specified filter. By default only one graph will be displayed showing number of packets per second.

The top part of the window contains the graphs and scales for the X and Y axis. If the graph is too long to fit inside the window there is a horizontal scrollbar below the drawing area that can scroll the graphs to the left or the right. The horizontal axis displays the time into the capture and the vertical axis will display the measured quantity at that time.

Below the drawing area and the scrollbar are the controls. On the bottom left there will be five similar sets of controls to control each induvidual graph such as ``Display:<button>'' which button will toggle that individual graph on/off. If <button> is ticked, the graph will be displayed. ``Color:<color>'' which is just a button to show which color will be used to draw that graph (color is only available in Gtk2 version) and finally ``Filter:<filter-text>'' which can be used to specify a display filter for that particular graph.

If filter-text is empty then all packets will be used to calculate the quantity for that graph. If filter-text is specified only those packets that match that display filter will be considered in the calculation of quantity.

To the right of the 5 graph controls there are four menus to control global aspects of the draw area and graphs. The ``Unit:'' menu is used to control what to measure; ``packets/tick'', ``bytes/tick'' or ``advanced...''

packets/tick will measure the number of packets matching the (if specified) display filter for the graph in each measurement interval.

bytes/tick will measure the total number of bytes in all packets matching the (if specified) display filter for the graph in each measurement interval.

advanced... see below

``Tick interval:'' specifies what measurement intervals to use. The default is 1 second and means that the data will be counted over 1 second intervals.

``Pixels per tick:'' specifies how many pixels wide each measurement interval will be in the drawing area. The default is 5 pixels per tick.

``Y-scale:'' controls the max value for the y-axis. Default value is ``auto'' which means that Wireshark will try to adjust the maxvalue automatically.

``advanced...'' If Unit:advanced... is selected the window will display two more controls for each of the five graphs. One control will be a menu where the type of calculation can be selected from SUM,COUNT,MAX,MIN,AVG and LOAD, and one control, textbox, where the name of a single display filter field can be specified.

The following restrictions apply to type and field combinations:

SUM: available for all types of integers and will calculate the SUM of all occurences of this field in the measurement interval. Note that some field can occur multiple times in the same packet and then all instances will be summed up. Example: 'tcp.len' which will count the amount of payload data transferred across TCP in each interval.

COUNT: available for all field types. This will COUNT the number of times certain field occurs in each interval. Note that some fields may occur multiple times in each packet and if that is the case then each instance will be counted independently and COUNT will be greater than the number of packets.

MAX: available for all integer and relative time fields. This will calculate the max seen integer/time value seen for the field during the interval. Example: 'smb.time' which will plot the maximum SMB response time.

MIN: available for all integer and relative time fields. This will calculate the min seen integer/time value seen for the field during the interval. Example: 'smb.time' which will plot the minimum SMB response time.

AVG: available for all integer and relative time fields.This will calculate the average seen integer/time value seen for the field during the interval. Example: 'smb.time' which will plot the average SMB response time.

LOAD: available only for relative time fields (response times).

Example of advanced: Display how NFS response time MAX/MIN/AVG changes over time:

Set first graph to:

   filter:nfs&&rpc.time
   Calc:MAX rpc.time

Set second graph to

   filter:nfs&&rpc.time
   Calc:AVG rpc.time

Set third graph to

   filter:nfs&&rpc.time
   Calc:MIN rpc.time

Example of advanced: Display how the average packet size from host a.b.c.d changes over time.

Set first graph to

   filter:ip.addr==a.b.c.d&&frame.pkt_len
   Calc:AVG frame.pkt_len

LOAD: The LOAD io-stat type is very different from anything you have ever seen before! While the response times themself as plotted by MIN,MAX,AVG are indications on the Server load (which affects the Server response time), the LOAD measurement measures the Client LOAD. What this measures is how much workload the client generates, i.e. how fast will the client issue new commands when the previous ones completed. i.e. the level of concurrency the client can maintain. The higher the number, the more and faster is the client issuing new commands. When the LOAD goes down, it may be due to client load making the client slower in issuing new commands (there may be other reasons as well, maybe the client just doesn't have any commands it wants to issue right then).

Load is measured in concurrency/number of overlapping i/o and the value 1000 means there is a constant load of one i/o.

In each tick interval the amount of overlap is measured. See the graph below containing three commands: Below the graph are the LOAD values for each interval that would be calculated.

  |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
  |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
  |     |  o=====*  |     |     |     |     |     |
  |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
  |  o========*     | o============*  |     |     |
  |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |     |
  --------------------------------------------------> Time
   500   1500   500  750   1000   500    0     0

Statistics:Conversation List
This option will open a new window that displays a list of all conversations between two endpoints. The list has one row for each unique conversation and displays total number of packets/bytes seen as well as number of packets/bytes in each direction.

By default the list is sorted according to the number of packets but by clicking on the column header; it is possible to re-sort the list in ascending or descending order by any column.

By first selecting a conversation by clicking on it and then using the right mouse button (on those platforms that have a right mouse button) wireshark will display a popup menu offering several different filter operations to apply to the capture.

These statistics windows can also be invoked from the Wireshark command line using the -z conv argument.

Statistics:Service Response Time:DCE-RPC
Open a window to display Service Response Time statistics for an arbitrary DCE-RPC program interface and display Procedure, Number of Calls, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT and Average SRT for all procedures for that program/version. These windows opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

This dialog will also allow an optional filter string to be used. If an optional filter string is used only such DCE-RPC request/response pairs that match that filter will be used to calculate the statistics. If no filter string is specified all request/response pairs will be used.

Statistics:Service Response Time:Fibre Channel
Open a window to display Service Response Time statistics for Fibre Channel and display FC Type, Number of Calls, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT and Average SRT for all FC types. These windows opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark. The Service Response Time is calculated as the time delta between the First packet of the exchange and the Last packet of the exchange.

This dialog will also allow an optional filter string to be used. If an optional filter string is used only such FC first/last exchange pairs that match that filter will be used to calculate the statistics. If no filter string is specified all request/response pairs will be used.

Statistics:Service Response Time:ONC-RPC
Open a window to display statistics for an arbitrary ONC-RPC program interface and display Procedure, Number of Calls, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT and Average SRT for all procedures for that program/version. These windows opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

This dialog will also allow an optional filter string to be used. If an optional filter string is used only such ONC-RPC request/response pairs that match that filter will be used to calculate the statistics. If no filter string is specified all request/response pairs will be used.

By first selecting a conversation by clicking on it and then using the right mouse button (on those platforms that have a right mouse button) wireshark will display a popup menu offering several different filter operations to apply to the capture.

Statistics:Service Response Time:SMB
Collect call/reply SRT (Service Response Time) data for SMB. Data collected is number of calls for each SMB command, MinSRT, MaxSRT and AvgSRT.

The data will be presented as separate tables for all normal SMB commands, all Transaction2 commands and all NT Transaction commands. Only those commands that are seen in the capture will have its stats displayed. Only the first command in a xAndX command chain will be used in the calculation. So for common SessionSetupAndX + TreeConnectAndX chains, only the SessionSetupAndX call will be used in the statistics. This is a flaw that might be fixed in the future.

You can apply an optional filter string in a dialog box, before starting the calculation. The stats will only be calculated on those calls matching that filter.

By first selecting a conversation by clicking on it and then using the right mouse button (on those platforms that have a right mouse button) wireshark will display a popup menu offering several different filter operations to apply to the capture.

Statistics:Service Response Time:MGCP
Collect requests/response SRT (Service Response Time) data for MGCP. Data collected is number of calls for each known MGCP Type, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT, Average SRT, Minimum in Packet, and Maximum in Packet. These windows opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

You can apply an optional filter string in a dialog box, before starting the calculation. The statistics will only be calculated on those calls matching that filter.

Statistics:Service Response Time:ITU-T H.225 RAS
Collect requests/response SRT (Service Response Time) data for ITU-T H.225 RAS. Data collected is number of calls for each known ITU-T H.225 RAS Message Type, Minimum SRT, Maximum SRT, Average SRT, Minimum in Packet, and Maximum in Packet. You will also get the number of Open Requests (Unresponded Requests), Discarded Responses (Responses without matching request) and Duplicate Messages. These windows opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

You can apply an optional filter string in a dialog box, before starting the calculation. The statistics will only be calculated on those calls matching that filter.

Statistics:ITU-T H.225
Count ITU-T H.225 messages and their reasons. In the first column you get a list of H.225 messages and H.225 message reasons, which occur in the current capture file. The number of occurences of each message or reason will be displayed in the second column. This window opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

You can apply an optional filter string in a dialog box, before starting the counter. The statistics will only be calculated on those calls matching that filter.

Statistics:SIP
Activate a counter for SIP messages. You will get the number of occurences of each SIP Method and of each SIP Status-Code. Additionally you also get the number of resent SIP Messages (only for SIP over UDP).

This window opened will update in semi-real time to reflect changes when doing live captures or when reading new capture files into Wireshark.

You can apply an optional filter string in a dialog box, before starting the counter. The statistics will only be calculated on those calls matching that filter.

Statistics:ONC-RPC Programs
This dialog will open a window showing aggregated RTT statistics for all ONC-RPC Programs/versions that exist in the capture file.
Help:Contents
Some help texts.
Help:Supported Protocols
List of supported protocols and display filter protocol fields.
Help:Manual Pages
Display locally installed HTML versions of these manual pages in a web browser.
Help:Wireshark Online
Various links to online resources to be open in a web browser, like <http://www.wireshark.org>.
Help:About Wireshark
See various information about Wireshark (see About dialog below), like the version, the folders used, the available plugins, ...
 

WINDOWS

Main Window
The main window contains the usual things like the menu, some toolbars, the main area and a statusbar. The main area is split into three panes, you can resize each pane using a ``thumb'' at the right end of each divider line.

The main window is much more flexible than before. The layout of the main window can be customized by the Layout page in the dialog box popped up by Edit:Preferences, the following will describe the layout with the default settings.

Main Toolbar
Some menu items are available for quick access here. There is no way to customize the items in the toolbar, however the toolbar can be hidden by View:Main Toolbar.
Filter Toolbar
A display filter can be entered into the filter toolbar. A filter for HTTP, HTTPS, and DNS traffic might look like this:

  tcp.port == 80 || tcp.port == 443 || tcp.port == 53

Selecting the Filter: button lets you choose from a list of named filters that you can optionally save. Pressing the Return or Enter keys, or selecting the Apply button, will cause the filter to be applied to the current list of packets. Selecting the Reset button clears the display filter so that all packets are displayed (again).

There is no way to customize the items in the toolbar, however the toolbar can be hidden by View:Filter Toolbar.

Packet List Pane
The top pane contains the list of network packets that you can scroll through and select. By default, the packet number, packet timestamp, source and destination addresses, protocol, and description are displayed for each packet; the Columns page in the dialog box popped up by Edit:Preferences lets you change this (although, unfortunately, you currently have to save the preferences, and exit and restart Wireshark, for those changes to take effect).

If you click on the heading for a column, the display will be sorted by that column; clicking on the heading again will reverse the sort order for that column.

An effort is made to display information as high up the protocol stack as possible, e.g. IP addresses are displayed for IP packets, but the MAC layer address is displayed for unknown packet types.

The right mouse button can be used to pop up a menu of operations.

The middle mouse button can be used to mark a packet.

Packet Details Pane
The middle pane contains a display of the details of the currently-selected packet. The display shows each field and its value in each protocol header in the stack. The right mouse button can be used to pop up a menu of operations.
Packet Bytes Pane
The lowest pane contains a hex and ASCII dump of the actual packet data. Selecting a field in the packet details highlights the corresponding bytes in this section.

The right mouse button can be used to pop up a menu of operations.

Statusbar
The statusbar is divided into two parts, on the left some context dependant things are shown, like information about the loaded file, on the right the number of packets are displayed: P = Packets captured/loaded, D = Displayed in packet list (after filtering), M = Marked by user.

The statusbar can be hidden by View:Statusbar.

Preferences
The Preferences dialog lets you control various personal preferences for the behavior of Wireshark.
User Interface Preferences
The User Interface page is used to modify small aspects of the GUI to your own personal taste:
Scrollbars
The vertical scrollbars in the three panes can be set to be either on the left or the right.
Selection Bars
The selection bar in the packet list and packet details can have either a ``browse'' or ``select'' behavior. If the selection bar has a ``browse'' behavior, the arrow keys will move an outline of the selection bar, allowing you to browse the rest of the list or details without changing the selection until you press the space bar. If the selection bar has a ``select'' behavior, the arrow keys will move the selection bar and change the selection to the new item in the packet list or packet details.
Tree Line Style
Trees can be drawn with no lines, solid lines, or dotted lines between items, or can be drawn with ``tab'' headings.
Tree Expander Style
The expander item that can be clicked to show or hide items under a tree item can be omitted (note that this will prevent you from changing whether those items are shown or hidden!), or can be drawn as squares, triangles, or circles.
Hex Display
The highlight method in the hex dump display for the selected protocol item can be set to use either inverse video, or bold characters.
Save Window Position
If this item is selected, the position of the main Wireshark window will be saved when Wireshark exits, and used when Wireshark is started again.
Save Window Size
If this item is selected, the size of the main Wireshark window will be saved when Wireshark exits, and used when Wireshark is started again.
File Open Dialog Behavior
This item allows the user to select how Wireshark handles the listing of the ``File Open'' Dialog when opening trace files. ``Remember Last Directory'' causes Wireshark to automatically position the dialog in the directory of the most recently opened file, even between launches of Wireshark. ``Always Open in Directory'' allows the user to define a persistent directory that the dialog will always default to.
Directory
Allows the user to specify a persistent File Open directory. Trailing slashes or backslashes will automatically be added.
Layout Preferences
The Layout page lets you specify the general layout of the main window. You can choose from six different layouts and fill the three panes with the contents you like.
Column Preferences
The Columns page lets you specify the number, title, and format of each column in the packet list.

The Column title entry is used to specify the title of the column displayed at the top of the packet list. The type of data that the column displays can be specified using the Column format option menu. The row of buttons on the left perform the following actions:

New
Adds a new column to the list.
Delete
Deletes the currently selected list item.
Up / Down
Moves the selected list item up or down one position.
Font Preferences
The Font page lets you select the font to be used for most text.
Color Preferences
The Colors page can be used to change the color of the text displayed in the TCP stream window and for marked packets. To change a color, simply select an attribute from the ``Set:'' menu and use the color selector to get the desired color. The new text colors are displayed as a sample text.
Capture Preferences
The Capture page lets you specify various parameters for capturing live packet data; these are used the first time a capture is started.

The Interface: combo box lets you specify the interface from which to capture packet data, or the name of a FIFO from which to get the packet data.

The Data link type: option menu lets you, for some interfaces, select the data link header you want to see on the packets you capture. For example, in some OSes and with some versions of libpcap, you can choose, on an 802.11 interface, whether the packets should appear as Ethernet packets (with a fake Ethernet header) or as 802.11 packets.

The Limit each packet to ... bytes check box lets you set the snapshot length to use when capturing live data; turn on the check box, and then set the number of bytes to use as the snapshot length.

The Filter: text entry lets you set a capture filter expression to be used when capturing.

If any of the environment variables SSH_CONNECTION, SSH_CLIENT, REMOTEHOST, DISPLAY, or SESSIONNAME are set, Wireshark will create a default capture filter that excludes traffic from the hosts and ports defined in those variables.

The Capture packets in promiscuous mode check box lets you specify whether to put the interface in promiscuous mode when capturing.

The Update list of packets in real time check box lets you specify that the display should be updated as packets are seen.

The Automatic scrolling in live capture check box lets you specify whether, in an ``Update list of packets in real time'' capture, the packet list pane should automatically scroll to show the most recently captured packets.

Printing Preferences
The radio buttons at the top of the Printing page allow you choose between printing packets with the File:Print Packet menu item as text or PostScript, and sending the output directly to a command or saving it to a file. The Command: text entry box, on UNIX-compatible systems, is the command to send files to (usually lpr), and the File: entry box lets you enter the name of the file you wish to save to. Additionally, you can select the File: button to browse the file system for a particular save file.
Protocol Preferences
There are also pages for various protocols that Wireshark dissects, controlling the way Wireshark handles those protocols.
Edit Capture Filter List
Edit Display Filter List
Capture Filter
Display Filter
Read Filter
Search Filter
The Edit Capture Filter List dialog lets you create, modify, and delete capture filters, and the Edit Display Filter List dialog lets you create, modify, and delete display filters.

The Capture Filter dialog lets you do all of the editing operations listed, and also lets you choose or construct a filter to be used when capturing packets.

The Display Filter dialog lets you do all of the editing operations listed, and also lets you choose or construct a filter to be used to filter the current capture being viewed.

The Read Filter dialog lets you do all of the editing operations listed, and also lets you choose or construct a filter to be used to as a read filter for a capture file you open.

The Search Filter dialog lets you do all of the editing operations listed, and also lets you choose or construct a filter expression to be used in a find operation.

In all of those dialogs, the Filter name entry specifies a descriptive name for a filter, e.g. Web and DNS traffic. The Filter string entry is the text that actually describes the filtering action to take, as described above.The dialog buttons perform the following actions:

New
If there is text in the two entry boxes, creates a new associated list item.
Edit
Modifies the currently selected list item to match what's in the entry boxes.
Delete
Deletes the currently selected list item.
Add Expression...
For display filter expressions, pops up a dialog box to allow you to construct a filter expression to test a particular field; it offers lists of field names, and, when appropriate, lists from which to select tests to perform on the field and values with which to compare it. In that dialog box, the OK button will cause the filter expression you constructed to be entered into the Filter string entry at the current cursor position.
OK
In the Capture Filter dialog, closes the dialog box and makes the filter in the Filter string entry the filter in the Capture Preferences dialog. In the Display Filter dialog, closes the dialog box and makes the filter in the Filter string entry the current display filter, and applies it to the current capture. In the Read Filter dialog, closes the dialog box and makes the filter in the Filter string entry the filter in the Open Capture File dialog. In the Search Filter dialog, closes the dialog box and makes the filter in the Filter string entry the filter in the Find Packet dialog.
Apply
Makes the filter in the Filter string entry the current display filter, and applies it to the current capture.
Save
If the list of filters being edited is the list of capture filters, saves the current filter list to the personal capture filters file, and if the list of filters being edited is the list of display filters, saves the current filter list to the personal display filters file.
Close
Closes the dialog without doing anything with the filter in the Filter string entry.
The Color Filters Dialog
This dialog displays a list of color filters and allows it to be modified.
THE FILTER LIST
Single rows may be selected by clicking. Multiple rows may be selected by using the ctrl and shift keys in combination with the mouse button.
NEW
Adds a new filter at the bottom of the list and opens the Edit Color Filter dialog box. You will have to alter the filter expression at least before the filter will be accepted. The format of color filter expressions is identical to that of display filters. The new filter is selected, so it may immediately be moved up and down, deleted or edited. To avoid confusion all filters are unselected before the new filter is created.
EDIT
Opens the Edit Color Filter dialog box for the selected filter. (If this button is disabled you may have more than one filter selected, making it ambiguous which is to be edited.)
DELETE
Deletes the selected color filter(s).
EXPORT
Allows you to choose a file in which to save the current list of color filters. You may also choose to save only the selected filters. A button is provided to save the filters in the global color filters file (you must have sufficient permissions to write this file, of course).
IMPORT
Allows you to choose a file containing color filters which are then added to the bottom of the current list. All the added filters are selected, so they may be moved to the correct position in the list as a group. To avoid confusion, all filters are unselected before the new filters are imported. A button is provided to load the filters from the global color filters file.
CLEAR
Deletes your personal color filters file, reloads the global color filters file, if any, and closes the dialog.
UP
Moves the selected filter(s) up the list, making it more likely that they will be used to color packets.
DOWN
Moves the selected filter(s) down the list, making it less likely that they will be used to color packets.
OK
Closes the dialog and uses the color filters as they stand.
APPLY
Colors the packets according to the current list of color filters, but does not close the dialog.
SAVE
Saves the current list of color filters in your personal color filters file. Unless you do this they will not be used the next time you start Wireshark.
CLOSE
Closes the dialog without changing the coloration of the packets. Note that changes you have made to the current list of color filters are not undone.
Capture Options
The Capture Options dialog lets you specify various parameters for capturing live packet data.

The Interface: field lets you specify the interface from which to capture packet data or a command from which to get the packet data via a pipe.

The Link layer header type: field lets you specify the interfaces link layer header type. This field is usually disabled, as most interface have only one header type.

The Capture packets in promiscuous mode check box lets you specify whether the interface should be put into promiscuous mode when capturing.

The Limit each packet to ... bytes check box and field lets you specify a maximum number of bytes per packet to capture and save; if the check box is not checked, the limit will be 65535 bytes.

The Capture Filter: entry lets you specify the capture filter using a tcpdump-style filter string as described above.

The File: entry lets you specify the file into which captured packets should be saved, as in the Printer Options dialog above. If not specified, the captured packets will be saved in a temporary file; you can save those packets to a file with the File:Save As menu item.

The Use multiple files check box lets you specify that the capture should be done in ``multiple files'' mode. This option is disabled, if the Update list of packets in real time option is checked.

The Next file every ... megabyte(s) check box and fields lets you specify that a switch to a next file should be done if the specified filesize is reached. You can also select the appriate unit, but beware that the filesize has a maximum of 2 GB. The check box is forced to be checked, as ``multiple files'' mode requires a file size to be specified.

The Next file every ... minute(s) check box and fields lets you specify that the switch to a next file should be done after the specified time has elapsed, even if the specified capture size is not reached.

The Ring buffer with ... files field lets you specify the number of files of a ring buffer. This feature will capture into to the first file again, after the specified amount of files were used.

The Stop capture after ... files field lets you specify the number of capture files used, until the capture is stopped.

The Stop capture after ... packet(s) check box and field let you specify that Wireshark should stop capturing after having captured some number of packets; if the check box is not checked, Wireshark will not stop capturing at some fixed number of captured packets.

The Stop capture after ... megabyte(s) check box and field lets you specify that Wireshark should stop capturing after the file to which captured packets are being saved grows as large as or larger than some specified number of megabytes. If the check box is not checked, Wireshark will not stop capturing at some capture file size (although the operating system on which Wireshark is running, or the available disk space, may still limit the maximum size of a capture file). This option is disabled, if ``multiple files'' mode is used,

The Stop capture after ... second(s) check box and field let you specify that Wireshark should stop capturing after it has been capturing for some number of seconds; if the check box is not checked, Wireshark will not stop capturing after some fixed time has elapsed.

The Update list of packets in real time check box lets you specify whether the display should be updated as packets are captured and, if you specify that, the Automatic scrolling in live capture check box lets you specify the packet list pane should automatically scroll to show the most recently captured packets as new packets arrive.

The Enable MAC name resolution, Enable network name resolution and Enable transport name resolution check boxes let you specify whether MAC addresses, network addresses, and transport-layer port numbers should be translated to names.

About
The About dialog lets you view various information about Wireshark.
About:Wireshark
The Wireshark page lets you view general information about Wireshark, like the installed version, licensing information and such.
About:Authors
The Authors page shows the author and all contributors.
About:Folders
The Folders page lets you view the directory names where Wireshark is searching it's various configuration and other files.
About:Plugins
The Plugins page lets you view the dissector plugin modules available on your system.

The Plugins List shows the name and version of each dissector plugin module found on your system.

On Unix-compatible systems, the plugins are looked for in the following directories: the lib/wireshark/plugins/$VERSION directory under the main installation directory (for example, /usr/local/lib/wireshark/plugins/$VERSION), and then $HOME/.wireshark/plugins.

On Windows systems, the plugins are looked for in the following directories: plugins\$VERSION directory under the main installation directory (for example, C:\Program Files\Wireshark\plugins\$VERSION), and then %APPDATA%\Wireshark\plugins\$VERSION (or, if %APPDATA% isn't defined, %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\Wireshark\plugins\$VERSION).

$VERSION is the version number of the plugin interface, which is typically the version number of Wireshark. Note that a dissector plugin module may support more than one protocol; there is not necessarily a one-to-one correspondence between dissector plugin modules and protocols. Protocols supported by a dissector plugin module are enabled and disabled using the Edit:Protocols dialog box, just as protocols built into Wireshark are.

 

CAPTURE FILTER SYNTAX

See the manual page of tcpdump(8).  

DISPLAY FILTER SYNTAX

For a complete table of protocol and protocol fields that are filterable in Wireshark see the wireshark-filter(4) manual page.  

FILES

These files contains various Wireshark configuration settings.
Preferences
The preferences files contain global (system-wide) and personal preference settings. If the system-wide preference file exists, it is read first, overriding the default settings. If the personal preferences file exists, it is read next, overriding any previous values. Note: If the command line flag -o is used (possibly more than once), it will in turn override values from the preferences files.

The preferences settings are in the form prefname:value, one per line, where prefname is the name of the preference and value is the value to which it should be set; white space is allowed between : and value. A preference setting can be continued on subsequent lines by indenting the continuation lines with white space. A # character starts a comment that runs to the end of the line:

  # Vertical scrollbars should be on right side?
  # TRUE or FALSE (case-insensitive).
  gui.scrollbar_on_right: TRUE

The global preferences file is looked for in the wireshark directory under the share subdirectory of the main installation directory (for example, /usr/local/share/wireshark/preferences) on UNIX-compatible systems, and in the main installation directory (for example, C:\Program Files\Wireshark\preferences) on Windows systems.

The personal preferences file is looked for in $HOME/.wireshark/preferences on UNIX-compatible systems and %APPDATA%\Wireshark\preferences (or, if %APPDATA% isn't defined, %USERPROFILE%\Application Data\Wireshark\preferences) on Windows systems.

Note: Whenever the preferences are saved by using the Save button in the Edit:Preferences dialog box, your personal preferences file will be overwritten with the new settings, destroying any comments and unknown/obsolete settings that were in the file.

Recent
The recent file contains personal settings (mostly GUI related) such as the current Wireshark window size. The file is saved at program exit and read in at program start automatically. Note: The command line flag -o may be used to override settings from this file.

The settings in this file have the same format as in the preferences files, and the same directory as for the personal preferences file is used.

Note: Whenever Wireshark is closed, your recent file will be overwritten with the new settings, destroying any comments and unknown/obsolete settings that were in the file.

Disabled (Enabled) Protocols
The disabled_protos files contain system-wide and personal lists of protocols that have been disabled, so that their dissectors are never called. The files contain protocol names, one per line, where the protocol name is the same name that would be used in a display filter for the protocol:

  http
  tcp     # a comment

If a protocol is listed in the global disabled_protos file, it is not displayed in the Analyze:Enabled Protocols dialog box, and so cannot be enabled by the user.

The global disabled_protos file uses the same directory as the global preferences file.

The personal disabled_protos file uses the same directory as the personal preferences file.

Note: Whenever the disabled protocols list is saved by using the Save button in the Analyze:Enabled Protocols dialog box, your personal disabled protocols file will be overwritten with the new settings, destroying any comments that were in the file.

Name Resolution (hosts)
If the personal hosts file exists, it is used to resolve IPv4 and IPv6 addresses before any other attempts are made to resolve them. The file has the standard hosts file syntax; each line contains one IP address and name, separated by whitespace. The same directory as for the personal preferences file is used.
Name Resolution (ethers)
The ethers files are consulted to correlate 6-byte hardware addresses to names. First the personal ethers file is tried and if an address is not found there the global ethers file is tried next.

Each line contains one hardware address and name, separated by whitespace. The digits of the hardware address are separated by colons (:), dashes (-) or periods (.). The same separator character must be used consistently in an address. The following three lines are valid lines of an ethers file:

  ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff          Broadcast
  c0-00-ff-ff-ff-ff          TR_broadcast
  00.00.00.00.00.00          Zero_broadcast

The global ethers file is looked for in the /etc directory on UNIX-compatible systems, and in the main installation directory (for example, C:\Program Files\Wireshark) on Windows systems.

The personal ethers file is looked for in the same directory as the personal preferences file.

Name Resolution (manuf)
The manuf file is used to match the 3-byte vendor portion of a 6-byte hardware address with the manufacturer's name; it can also contain well-known MAC addresses and address ranges specified with a netmask. The format of the file is the same as the ethers files, except that entries such as:

  00:00:0C      Cisco

can be provided, with the 3-byte OUI and the name for a vendor, and entries such as:

  00-00-0C-07-AC/40     All-HSRP-routers

can be specified, with a MAC address and a mask indicating how many bits of the address must match. The above entry, for example, has 40 significant bits, or 5 bytes, and would match addresses from 00-00-0C-07-AC-00 through 00-00-0C-07-AC-FF. The mask need not be a multiple of 8.

The manuf file is looked for in the same directory as the global preferences file.

Name Resolution (ipxnets)
The ipxnets files are used to correlate 4-byte IPX network numbers to names. First the global ipxnets file is tried and if that address is not found there the personal one is tried next.

The format is the same as the ethers file, except that each address is four bytes instead of six. Additionally, the address can be represented as a single hexadecimal number, as is more common in the IPX world, rather than four hex octets. For example, these four lines are valid lines of an ipxnets file:

  C0.A8.2C.00              HR
  c0-a8-1c-00              CEO
  00:00:BE:EF              IT_Server1
  110f                     FileServer3

The global ipxnets file is looked for in the /etc directory on UNIX-compatible systems, and in the main installation directory (for example, C:\Program Files\Wireshark) on Windows systems.

The personal ipxnets file is looked for in the same directory as the personal preferences file.

Capture Filters
The cfilters files contain system-wide and personal capture filters. Each line contains one filter, starting with the string displayed in the dialog box in quotation marks, followed by the filter string itself:

  "HTTP" port 80
  "DCERPC" port 135

The global cfilters file uses the same directory as the global preferences file.

The personal cfilters file uses the same directory as the personal preferences file. It is written through the Capture:Capture Filters dialog.

If the global cfilters file exists, it is used only if the personal cfilters file does not exist; global and personal capture filters are not merged.

Display Filters
The dfilters files contain system-wide and personal display filters. Each line contains one filter, starting with the string displayed in the dialog box in quotation marks, followed by the filter string itself:

  "HTTP" http
  "DCERPC" dcerpc

The global dfilters file uses the same directory as the global preferences file.

The personal dfilters file uses the same directory as the personal preferences file. It is written through the Analyze:Display Filters dialog.

If the global dfilters file exists, it is used only if the personal dfilters file does not exist; global and personal display filters are not merged.

Color Filters (Coloring Rules)
The colorfilters files contain system-wide and personal color filters. Each line contains one filter, starting with the string displayed in the dialog box, followed by the corresponding display filter. Then the background and foreground colors are appended:

  # a comment
  @tcp@tcp@[59345,58980,65534][0,0,0]
  @udp@udp@[28834,57427,65533][0,0,0]

The global colorfilters file uses the same directory as the global preferences file.

The personal colorfilters file uses the same directory as the personal preferences file. It is written through the View:Coloring Rules dialog.

If the global colorfilters file exists, it is used only if the personal colorfilters file does not exist; global and personal color filters are not merged.

GTK rc files
The gtkrc files contain system-wide and personal GTK theme settings.

The global gtkrc file uses the same directory as the global preferences file.

The personal gtkrc file uses the same directory as the personal preferences file.

Plugins
See above in the description of the About:Plugins page.
 

SEE ALSO

wireshark-filter(4), tshark(1), editcap(1), tcpdump(8), pcap(3), dumpcap(1), mergecap(1), text2pcap(1)  

NOTES

The latest version of Wireshark can be found at <http://www.wireshark.org>.

HTML versions of the Wireshark project man pages are available at: <http://www.wireshark.org/docs/man-pages>.  

AUTHORS


Original Author
-------- ------
Gerald Combs            <gerald[AT]wireshark.org>

Contributors
------------
Gilbert Ramirez         <gram[AT]alumni.rice.edu> 
Hannes R. Boehm         <hannes[AT]boehm.org> 
Mike Hall               <mike [AT] hallzone.net> 
Bobo Rajec              <bobo[AT]bsp-consulting.sk> 
Laurent Deniel          <laurent.deniel[AT]free.fr> 
Don Lafontaine          <lafont02[AT]cn.ca> 
Guy Harris              <guy[AT]alum.mit.edu> 
Simon Wilkinson         <sxw[AT]dcs.ed.ac.uk> 
Jo.rg Mayer              <jmayer[AT]loplof.de> 
Martin Maciaszek        <fastjack[AT]i-s-o.net> 
Didier Jorand           <Didier.Jorand[AT]alcatel.fr> 
Jun-ichiro itojun Hagino <itojun[AT]itojun.org> 
Richard Sharpe          <sharpe[AT]ns.aus.com> 
John McDermott          <jjm[AT]jkintl.com> 
Jeff Jahr               <jjahr[AT]shastanets.com> 
Brad Robel-Forrest      <bradr[AT]watchguard.com> 
Ashok Narayanan         <ashokn[AT]cisco.com> 
Aaron Hillegass         <aaron[AT]classmax.com> 
Jason Lango             <jal[AT]netapp.com> 
Johan Feyaerts          <Johan.Feyaerts[AT]siemens.com> 
Olivier Abad            <oabad[AT]noos.fr> 
Thierry Andry           <Thierry.Andry[AT]advalvas.be> 
Jeff Foster             <jfoste[AT]woodward.com> 
Peter Torvals           <petertv[AT]xoommail.com> 
Christophe Tronche      <ch.tronche[AT]computer.org> 
Nathan Neulinger        <nneul[AT]umr.edu> 
Tomislav Vujec          <tvujec[AT]carnet.hr> 
Kojak                   <kojak[AT]bigwig.net> 
Uwe Girlich             <Uwe.Girlich[AT]philosys.de> 
Warren Young            <tangent[AT]mail.com> 
Heikki Vatiainen        <hessu[AT]cs.tut.fi> 
Greg Hankins            <gregh[AT]twoguys.org> 
Jerry Talkington        <jtalkington[AT]users.sourceforge.net> 
Dave Chapeskie          <dchapes[AT]ddm.on.ca> 
James Coe               <jammer[AT]cin.net> 
Bert Driehuis           <driehuis[AT]playbeing.org> 
Stuart Stanley          <stuarts[AT]mxmail.net> 
John Thomes             <john[AT]ensemblecom.com> 
Laurent Cazalet         <laurent.cazalet[AT]mailclub.net> 
Thomas Parvais          <thomas.parvais[AT]advalvas.be> 
Gerrit Gehnen           <G.Gehnen[AT]atrie.de> 
Craig Newell            <craign[AT]cheque.uq.edu.au> 
Ed Meaney               <emeaney[AT]cisco.com> 
Dietmar Petras          <DPetras[AT]ELSA.de> 
Fred Reimer             <fwr[AT]ga.prestige.net> 
Florian Lohoff          <flo[AT]rfc822.org> 
Jochen Friedrich        <jochen+ethereal[AT]scram.de> 
Paul Welchinski         <paul.welchinski[AT]telusplanet.net> 
Doug Nazar              <nazard[AT]dragoninc.on.ca> 
Andreas Sikkema         <h323 [AT] ramdyne.nl> 
Mark Muhlestein         <mmm[AT]netapp.com> 
Graham Bloice           <graham.bloice[AT]trihedral.com> 
Ralf Schneider          <ralf.schneider[AT]alcatel.se> 
Yaniv Kaul              <ykaul[AT]netvision.net.il> 
Paul Ionescu            <paul[AT]acorp.ro> 
Mark Burton             <markb[AT]ordern.com> 
Stefan Raab             <sraab[AT]cisco.com> 
Mark Clayton            <clayton[AT]shore.net> 
Michael Rozhavsky       <mike[AT]tochna.technion.ac.il> 
Dug Song                <dugsong[AT]monkey.org> 
Michael Tu.xen           <tuexen [AT] fh-muenster.de> 
Bruce Korb              <bkorb[AT]sco.com> 
Jose Pedro Oliveira     <jpo[AT]di.uminho.pt> 
David Frascone          <dave[AT]frascone.com> 
Peter Kjellerstedt      <pkj[AT]axis.com> 
Phil Techau             <phil_t[AT]altavista.net> 
Wes Hardaker            <hardaker[AT]users.sourceforge.net> 
Robert Tsai             <rtsai[AT]netapp.com> 
Craig Metz              <cmetz[AT]inner.net> 
Per Flock               <per.flock[AT]axis.com> 
Jack Keane              <jkeane[AT]OpenReach.com> 
Brian Wellington        <bwelling[AT]xbill.org> 
Santeri Paavolainen     <santtu[AT]ssh.com> 
Ulrich Kiermayr         <uk[AT]ap.univie.ac.at> 
Neil Hunter             <neil.hunter[AT]energis-squared.com> 
Ralf Holzer             <ralf[AT]well.com> 
Craig Rodrigues         <rodrigc [AT] attbi.com> 
Ed Warnicke             <hagbard[AT]physics.rutgers.edu> 
Johan Jorgensen         <johan.jorgensen[AT]axis.com> 
Frank Singleton         <frank.singleton[AT]ericsson.com> 
Kevin Shi               <techishi[AT]ms22.hinet.net> 
Mike Frisch             <mfrisch[AT]isurfer.ca> 
Burke Lau               <burke_lau[AT]agilent.com> 
Martti Kuparinen        <martti.kuparinen[AT]iki.fi> 
David Hampton           <dhampton[AT]mac.com> 
Kent Engstro.m           <kent[AT]unit.liu.se> 
Ronnie Sahlberg         <ronnie_sahlberg[AT]ozemail.com.au> 
Borosa Tomislav         <tomislav.borosa[AT]SIEMENS.HR> 
Alexandre P. Ferreira   <alexandref[AT]tcoip.com.br> 
Simharajan Srishylam    <Simharajan.Srishylam[AT]netapp.com> 
Greg Kilfoyle           <gregk[AT]redback.com> 
James E. Flemer         <jflemer[AT]acm.jhu.edu> 
Peter Lei               <peterlei[AT]cisco.com> 
Thomas Gimpel           <thomas.gimpel[AT]ferrari.de> 
Albert Chin             <china[AT]thewrittenword.com> 
Charles Levert          <charles[AT]comm.polymtl.ca> 
Todd Sabin              <tas[AT]webspan.net> 
Eduardo Perez Ureta     <eperez[AT]dei.inf.uc3m.es> 
Martin Thomas           <martin_a_thomas[AT]yahoo.com> 
Hartmut Mueller         <hartmut[AT]wendolene.ping.de> 
Michal Melerowicz       <Michal.Melerowicz[AT]nokia.com> 
Hannes Gredler          <hannes[AT]juniper.net> 
Inoue                   <inoue[AT]ainet.or.jp> 
Olivier Biot            <obiot.ethereal[AT]gmail.com> 
Patrick Wolfe           <pjw[AT]zocalo.cellular.ameritech.com> 
Martin Held             <Martin.Held[AT]icn.siemens.de> 
Riaan Swart             <rswart[AT]cs.sun.ac.za> 
Christian Lacunza       <celacunza[AT]gmx.net> 
Scott Renfro            <scott[AT]renfro.org> 
Juan Toledo             <toledo[AT]users.sourceforge.net> 
Jean-Christian Pennetier <jeanchristian.pennetier[AT]rd.francetelecom.fr> 
Jian Yu                 <bgp4news[AT]yahoo.com> 
Eran Mann               <emann[AT]opticalaccess.com> 
Andy Hood               <ajhood [AT] fl.net.au> 
Randy McEoin            <rmceoin[AT]pe.net> 
Edgar Iglesias          <edgar.iglesias[AT]axis.com> 
Martina Obermeier       <Martina.Obermeier[AT]icn.siemens.de> 
Javier Achirica         <achirica[AT]ttd.net> 
B. Johannessen          <bob[AT]havoq.com> 
Thierry Pelle           <thierry.pelle[AT]laposte.net> 
Francisco Javier Cabello <fjcabello[AT]vtools.es> 
Laurent Rabret          <laurent.rabret[AT]rd.francetelecom.fr> 
nuf si                  <gnippiks[AT]yahoo.com> 
Jeff Morriss            <jeff.morriss[AT]ulticom.com> 
Aamer Akhter            <aakhter[AT]cisco.com> 
Pekka Savola            <pekkas[AT]netcore.fi> 
David Eisner            <cradle[AT]Glue.umd.edu> 
Steve Dickson           <steved[AT]talarian.com> 
Markus Seehofer         <mseehofe[AT]nt.hirschmann.de> 
Lee Berger              <lberger[AT]roy.org> 
Motonori Shindo         <mshindo[AT]mshindo.net> 
Terje Krogdahl          <tekr[AT]nextra.com> 
Jean-Francois Mule      <jfm[AT]cablelabs.com> 
Thomas Wittwer          <thomas.wittwer[AT]iclip.ch> 
Matthias Nyffenegger    <matthias.nyffenegger[AT]iclip.ch> 
Palle Lyckegaard        <Palle[AT]lyckegaard.dk> 
Nicolas Balkota         <balkota[AT]mac.com> 
Tom Uijldert            <Tom.Uijldert[AT]cmg.nl> 
Akira Endoh             <endoh[AT]netmarks.co.jp> 
Graeme Hewson           <graeme.hewson[AT]oracle.com> 
Pasi Eronen             <pe[at]iki.fi> 
Georg von Zezschwitz    <gvz[AT]2scale.net> 
Steffen Weinreich       <steve[AT]weinreich.org> 
Marc Milgram            <ethereal[AT]mmilgram.NOSPAMmail.net> 
Gordon McKinney         <gordon[AT]night-ray.com> 
Pavel Novotny           <Pavel.Novotny[AT]icn.siemens.de> 
Shinsuke Suzuki         <suz[AT]kame.net> 
Andrew C. Feren         <acferen[AT]yahoo.com> 
Tomas Kukosa            <tomas.kukosa [AT] siemens.com> 
Andreas Stockmeier      <a.stockmeier[AT]avm.de> 
Pekka Nikander          <pekka.nikander[AT]nomadiclab.com> 
Hamish Moffatt          <hamish[AT]cloud.net.au> 
Kazushi Sugyo           <k-sugyou[AT]nwsl.mesh.ad.jp> 
Tim Potter              <tpot[AT]samba.org> 
Raghu Angadi            <rangadi[AT]inktomi.com> 
Taisuke Sasaki          <sasaki[AT]soft.net.fujitsu.co.jp> 
Tim Newsham             <newsham[AT]lava.net> 
Tom Nisbet              <Tnisbet[AT]VisualNetworks.com> 
Darren New              <dnew[AT]san.rr.com> 
Pavel Mores             <pvl[AT]uh.cz> 
Bernd Becker            <bb[AT]bernd-becker.de> 
Heinz Prantner          <Heinz.Prantner[AT]radisys.com> 
Irfan Khan              <ikhan[AT]qualcomm.com> 
Jayaram V.R             <vjayar[AT]cisco.com> 
Dinesh Dutt             <ddutt[AT]cisco.com> 
Nagarjuna Venna         <nvenna[AT]Brixnet.com> 
Jirka Novak             <j.novak[AT]netsystem.cz> 
Ricardo Barroetaven~a    <rbarroetavena[AT]veufort.com> 
Alan Harrison           <alanharrison[AT]mail.com> 
Mike Frantzen           <frantzen[AT]w4g.org> 
Charlie Duke            <cduke[AT]fvc.com> 
Alfred Arnold           <Alfred.Arnold[AT]elsa.de> 
Dermot Bradley          <dermot.bradley[AT]openwave.com> 
Adam Sulmicki           <adam[AT]cfar.umd.edu> 
Kari Tiirikainen        <kari.tiirikainen[AT]nokia.com> 
John Mackenzie          <John.A.Mackenzie[AT]t-online.de> 
Peter Valchev           <pvalchev[AT]openbsd.org> 
Alex Rozin              <Arozin[AT]mrv.com> 
Jouni Malinen           <jkmaline[AT]cc.hut.fi> 
Paul E. Erkkila         <pee[AT]erkkila.org> 
Jakob Schlyter          <jakob[AT]openbsd.org> 
Jim Sienicki            <sienicki[AT]issanni.com> 
Steven French           <sfrench[AT]us.ibm.com> 
Diana Eichert           <deicher[AT]sandia.gov> 
Blair Cooper            <blair[AT]teamon.com> 
Kikuchi Ayamura         <ayamura[AT]ayamura.org> 
Didier Gautheron        <dgautheron[AT]magic.fr> 
Phil Williams           <csypbw[AT]comp.leeds.ac.uk> 
Kevin Humphries         <khumphries[AT]networld.com> 
Erik Nordstro.m          <erik.nordstrom[AT]it.uu.se> 
Devin Heitmueller       <dheitmueller[AT]netilla.com> 
Chenjiang Hu            <chu[AT]chiaro.com> 
Kan Sasaki              <sasaki[AT]fcc.ad.jp> 
Stefan Wenk             <stefan.wenk[AT]gmx.at> 
Ruud Linders            <ruud[AT]lucent.com> 
Andrew Esh              <Andrew.Esh[AT]tricord.com> 
Greg Morris             <GMORRIS[AT]novell.com> 
Dirk Steinberg          <dws[AT]dirksteinberg.de> 
Kari Heikkila           <kari.o.heikkila[AT]nokia.com> 
Olivier Dreux           <Olivier.Dreux[AT]alcatel.fr> 
Michael Stiller         <ms[AT]2scale.net> 
Antti Tuominen          <ajtuomin[AT]tml.hut.fi> 
Martin Gignac           <lmcgign[AT]mobilitylab.net> 
John Wells              <wells[AT]ieee.org> 
Loic Tortay             <tortay[AT]cc.in2p3.fr> 
Steve Housley           <Steve_Housley[AT]eur.3com.com> 
Peter Hawkins           <peter[AT]hawkins.emu.id.au> 
Bill Fumerola           <billf[AT]FreeBSD.org> 
Chris Waters            <chris[AT]waters.co.nz> 
Solomon Peachy          <pizza[AT]shaftnet.org> 
Jaime Fournier          <Jaime.Fournier [AT] hush.com> 
Markus Steinmann        <ms[AT]seh.de> 
Tsutomu Mieno           <iitom[AT]utouto.com> 
Yasuhiro Shirasaki      <yasuhiro[AT]gnome.gr.jp> 
Anand V. Narwani        <anand[AT]narwani.org> 
Christopher K. St. John <cks[AT]distributopia.com> 
Nix                     <nix[AT]esperi.demon.co.uk> 
Liviu Daia              <Liviu.Daia[AT]imar.ro> 
Richard Urwin           <richard[AT]soronlin.org.uk> 
Prabhakar Krishnan      <Prabhakar.Krishnan[AT]netapp.com> 
Jim McDonough           <jmcd[AT]us.ibm.com> 
Sergei Shokhor          <sshokhor[AT]uroam.com> 
Hidetaka Ogawa          <ogawa[AT]bs2.qnes.nec.co.jp> 
Jan Kratochvil          <short[AT]ucw.cz> 
Alfred Koebler          <ak[AT]icon-sult.de> 
Vassilii Khachaturov    <Vassilii.Khachaturov[AT]comverse.com> 
Bill Studenmund         <wrstuden[AT]wasabisystems.com> 
Brian Bruns             <camber[AT]ais.org> 
Flavio Poletti          <flavio[AT]polettix.it> 
Marcus Haebler          <haeblerm[AT]yahoo.com> 
Ulf Lamping             <ulf.lamping[AT]web.de> 
Matthew Smart           <smart[AT]monkey.org> 
Luke Howard             <lukeh[AT]au.padl.com> 
PC Drew                 <drewpc[AT]ibsncentral.com> 
Renzo Tomas             <renzo.toma [AT] xs4all.nl> 
Clive A. Stubbings      <eth [AT] vjet.demon.co.uk> 
Steve Langasek          <vorlon [AT] netexpress.net> 
Brad Hards              <bhards[AT]bigpond.net.au> 
cjs 2895                <cjs2895[AT]hotmail.com> 
Lutz Jaenicke           <Lutz.Jaenicke [AT] aet.TU-Cottbus.DE> 
Senthil Kumar Nagappan  <sknagappan [AT] yahoo.com> 
Jason House             <jhouse [AT] mitre.org> 
Peter Fales             <psfales [AT] lucent.com> 
Fritz Budiyanto         <fritzb88 [AT] yahoo.com> 
Jean-Baptiste Marchand  <Jean-Baptiste.Marchand [AT] hsc.fr> 
Andreas Trauer          <andreas.trauer [AT] siemens.com> 
Ronald Henderson        <Ronald.Henderson [AT] CognicaseUSA.com> 
Brian Ginsbach          <ginsbach [AT] cray.com> 
Dave Richards           <d_m_richards [AT] comcast.net> 
Martin Regner           <martin.regner [AT] chello.se> 
Jason Greene            <jason [AT] inetgurus.net> 
Marco Molteni           <mmolteni [AT] cisco.com> 
James Harris            <jharris [AT] fourhorsemen.org> 
rmkml                   <rmkml [AT] wanadoo.fr> 
Anders Broman           <anders.broman [AT] ericsson.com> 
Christian Falckenberg   <christian.falckenberg [AT] nortelnetworks.com> 
Huagang Xie             <xie [AT] lids.org> 
Pasi Kovanen            <Pasi.Kovanen [AT] tahoenetworks.fi> 
Teemu Rinta-aho         <teemu.rinta-aho [AT] nomadiclab.com> 
Martijn Schipper        <martijn.schipper [AT] intersil.com> 
Wayne Parrott           <wayne_p [AT] pacific.net.au> 
Laurent Meyer           <laurent.meyer6 [AT] wanadoo.fr> 
Lars Roland             <Lars.Roland [AT] gmx.net> 
Miha Jemec              <m.jemec [AT] iskratel.si> 
Markus Friedl           <markus [AT] openbsd.org> 
Todd Montgomery         <tmontgom [AT] tibco.com> 
emre                    <emre [AT] flash.net> 
Stephen Shelley         <steve.shelley [AT] attbi.com> 
Erwin Rol               <erwin [AT] erwinrol.com> 
Duncan Laurie           <duncan [AT] sun.com> 
Tony Schene             <schene [AT] pcisys.net> 
Matthijs Melchior       <mmelchior [AT] xs4all.nl> 
Garth Bushell           <gbushell [AT] elipsan.com> 
Mark C. Brown           <mbrown [AT] hp.com> 
Can Erkin Acar          <canacar [AT] eee.metu.edu.tr> 
Martin Warnes           <martin.warnes [AT] ntlworld.com> 
J Bruce Fields          <bfields [AT] fieldses.org> 
tz                      <tz1 [AT] mac.com> 
Jeff Liu                <jqliu [AT] broadcom.com> 
Niels Koot              <Niels.Koot [AT] logicacmg.com> 
Lionel Ains             <lains [AT] gmx.net> 
Joakim Wiberg           <jow [AT] hms-networks.com> 
Jeff Rizzo              <riz [AT] boogers.sf.ca.us> 
Christoph Wiest         <ch.wiest [AT] tesionmail.de> 
Xuan Zhang              <xz [AT] aemail4u.com> 
Thierry Martin          <thierry.martin [AT] accellent-group.com> 
Oleg Terletsky          <oleg.terletsky [AT] comverse.com> 
Michael Lum             <mlum [AT] telostech.com> 
Shiang-Ming Huang       <smhuang [AT] pcs.csie.nctu.edu.tw> 
Tony Lindstrom          <tony.lindstrom [AT] ericsson.com> 
Niklas Ogren            <niklas.ogren [AT] 71.se> 
Jesper Peterson         <jesper [AT] endace.com> 
Giles Scott             <gscott [AT] arubanetworks.com> 
Vincent Jardin          <vincent.jardin [AT] 6wind.com> 
Jean-Michel Fayard      <jean-michel.fayard [AT] moufrei.de> 
Josef Korelus           <jkor [AT] quick.cz> 
Brian K. Teravskis      <Brian_Teravskis [AT] Cargill.com> 
Nathan Jennings         <njen [AT] triad.rr.com> 
Hans Viens              <hviens [AT] mediatrix.com> 
Kevin A. Noll           <knoll [AT] poss.com> 
Emanuele Caratti        <wiz [AT] libero.it> 
Graeme Reid             <graeme.reid [AT] norwoodsystems.com> 
Lars Ruoff              <lars.ruoff [AT] sxb.bsf.alcatel.fr> 
Samuel Qu               <samuel.qu [AT] utstar.com> 
Baktha Muralitharan     <muralidb [AT] cisco.com> 
Loi.c Minier             <lool [AT] dooz.org> 
Marcel Holtmann         <marcel [AT] holtmann.org> 
Scott Emberley          <scotte [AT] netinst.com> 
Brian Fundakowski Feldman <bfeldman [AT] fla.fujitsu.com> 
Yuriy Sidelnikov        <ysidelnikov [AT] hotmail.com> 
Matthias Drochner       <M.Drochner [AT] fz-juelich.de> 
Dave Sclarsky           <dave_sclarsky [AT] cnt.com> 
Scott Hovis             <scott.hovis [AT] ums.msfc.nasa.gov> 
David Fort              <david.fort [AT] irisa.fr> 
Martijn Schipper        <mschipper [AT] globespanvirata.com> 
Felix Fei               <felix.fei [AT] utstar.com> 
Christoph Neusch        <christoph.neusch [AT] nortelnetworks.com> 
Jan Kiszka              <jan.kiszka [AT] web.de> 
Joshua Craig Douglas    <jdouglas [AT] enterasys.com> 
Dick Gooris             <gooris [AT] lucent.com> 
Michael Shuldman        <michaels [AT] inet.no> 
Tadaaki Nagao           <nagao [AT] iij.ad.jp> 
Aaron Woo               <woo [AT] itd.nrl.navy.mil> 
Chris Wilson            <chris [AT] mxtelecom.com> 
Rolf Fiedler            <Rolf.Fiedler [AT] Innoventif.com> 
Alastair Maw            <ethereal [AT] almaw.com> 
Sam Leffler             <sam [AT] errno.com> 
Martin Mathieson        <martin [AT] arca-technologies.com> 
Christian Wagner        <Christian.Wagner [AT] stud.uni-karlsruhe.de> 
Edwin Calo              <calo [AT] fusemail.com> 
Ian Schorr              <ischorr [AT] comcast.net> 
Rowan McFarland         <rmcfarla[AT]cisco.com> 
John Engelhart          <johne [AT] zang.com> 
Ryuji Somegawa          <ryuji-so [AT] is.aist-nara.ac.jp> 
metatech                <metatech [AT] flashmail.com> 
Brian Wheeler           <Brian.Wheeler [AT] arrisi.com> 
Josh Bailey             <joshbailey [AT] lucent.com> 
Jelmer Vernooij         <jelmer [AT] samba.org> 
Duncan Sargeant         <dunc-ethereal-dev [AT] rcpt.to> 
Love Ho.rnquist A°strand  <lha [AT] it.su.se> 
Lukas Pokorny           <maskis [AT] seznam.cz> 
Carlos Pignataro        <cpignata [AT] cisco.com> 
Thomas Anders           <thomas.anders [AT] blue-cable.de> 
Rich Coe                <Richard.Coe [AT] med.ge.com> 
Dominic Bechaz          <bdo [AT] zhwin.ch> 
Richard van der Hoff    <richardv [AT] mxtelecom.com> 
Shaun Jackman           <sjackman [AT] gmail.com> 
Jon Oberheide           <jon [AT] oberheide.org> 
Henry Ptasinski         <henryp [AT] broadcom.com> 
Roberto Morro           <Roberto.Morro [AT] TILAB.COM> 
Chris Maynard           <Christopher.Maynard [AT] GTECH.COM> 
SEKINE Hideki           <sekineh [AT] gf7.so-net.ne.jp> 
Jeff Connelly           <shellreef+mp2p [AT] gmail.com> 
Irene Ru.ngle              <i.ruengeler [AT] fh-muenster.de 
M. Ortega y Strupp      <moys [AT] loplof.de> 
Kelly Byrd              <kbyrd-ethereal [AT] memcpy.com> 
Luis Ontanon            <luis.ontanon[AT]gmail.com> 
Luca Deri               <deri [AT] ntop.org> 
Viorel Suman            <vsuman [AT] avmob.ro> 
Alejandro Vaquero       <alejandro.vaquero [AT] verso.com> 
Francesco Fondelli      <francesco.fondelli [AT] gmail.com> 
Bill Meier              <wmeier [AT] newsguy.com> 
Susanne Edlund          <Susanne.Edlund [AT] ericsson.com> 
Victor Stratan          <hidralisk [AT] yahoo.com> 
Peter Johansson         <Peter.Johansson [AT] contactor.se> 
Stefan Metzmacher       <metze [AT] samba.org> 
Abhijit Menon-Sen       <ams [AT] oryx.com> 
James Fields            <jvfields [AT] tds.net> 
Kevin Johnson           <kjohnson [AT] secureideas.net> 
Mike Duigou             <bondolo [AT] jxta.org> 
Deepak Jain             <jain1971 [AT] yahoo.com> 
Stefano Pettini         <spettini [AT] users.sourceforge.net> 
Jon Ringle              <ml-ethereal [AT] ringle.org> 
Tim Endean              <endeant [AT] hotmail.com> 
Charlie Lenahan         <clenahan [AT] fortresstech.com> 
Takeshi Nakashima       <T.Nakashima [AT] jp.yokogawa.com> 
Shoichi Sakane          <sakane [AT] tanu.org> 
Michael Richardson      <Michael.Richardson [AT] protiviti.com> 
Olivier Jacques         <olivier.jacques [AT] hp.com> 
Francisco Alcoba        <francisco.alcoba [AT] ericsson.com> 
Nils O. Sela°sdal     <noselasd [AT] asgaard.homelinux.org> 
Guillaume Chazarain     <guichaz [AT] yahoo.fr> 
Angelo Bannack          <angelo.bannack[AT]siemens.com> 
Paolo Frigo             <paolofrigo [AT] gmail.com> 
Jeremy J Ouellette      <jouellet [AT] scires.com> 
Aboo Valappil           <valappil_aboo [AT] emc.com> 
Fred Hoekstra           <fred.hoekstra [AT] philips.com> 
Ankur Aggarwal          <ankur [AT] in.athenasemi.com> 
Viorel Suman            <vsuman [AT] avmob.ro> 
Lucian Piros            <lpiros [AT] avmob.ro> 
Juan Gonzalez           <juan.gonzalez [AT] pikatech.com> 
Brian Bogora            <brian_bogora [AT] mitel.com> 
Jim Young               <sysjhy [AT] langate.gsu.edu> 
Jeff Snyder             <jeff [AT] mxtelecom.com> 
William Fiveash         <William.Fiveash [AT] sun.com> 
Graeme Lunt             <graeme.lunt [AT] smhs.co.uk> 
Menno Andriesse         <s5066 [AT] nc3a.nato.int> 
Stig Bjorlykke          <stig [AT] bjorlykke.org> 
Kyle J. Harms           <kyle.j.harms [AT] boeing.com> 
Eric Wedel              <ewedel [AT] bluearc.com> 
Du Bingyao              <dubingyao[AT]gmail.com> 
Eric Hultin             <Eric.Hultin[AT]arrisi.com> 
Paolo Abeni             <paolo.abeni [AT] email.it> 
W. Borgert              <debacle [AT] debian.org> 
Frederic Roudaut        <frederic.roudaut [AT] irisa.fr> 
Christoph Scholz        <scholz_ch [AT] web.de> 
Wolfgang Hansmann       <hansmann [AT] cs.uni-bonn.de> 
Kees Cook               <kees [AT] outflux.net> 
Thomas Dreibholz        <dreibh [AT] exp-math.uni-essen.de> 
Authesserre Samuel      <sauthess [AT] gmail.com> 
Balint Reczey           <balint.reczey [AT] ericsson.com> 
Stephen Fisher          <stephentfisher [AT] yahoo.com> 
Krzysztof Burghardt     <krzysztof [AT] burghardt.pl> 
Peter Racz              <racz [AT] ifi.unizh.ch> 
Jakob Bratkovic         <j.bratkovic [AT] iskratel.si> 
Mark Lewis              <mlewis [AT] altera.com> 
Dominic Bechaz          <bdo [AT] zhwin.ch> 
David Buechi            <bhd [AT] zhwin.ch> 
Bill Florac               <bill.florac [AT] etcconnect.com> 
Alex Burlyga              <Alex.Burlyga [AT] netapp.com> 
Douglas Pratley          <Douglas.pratley [AT] detica.com> 
Giorgio Tino            <giorgio.tino [AT] cacetech.com> 
Davide Schiera          <davide.schiera [AT] cacetech.com> 
Sebastien Tandel        <sebastien [AT] tandel.be> 
and by:

Pavel Roskin            <proski [AT] gnu.org>
Georgi Guninski         <guninski [AT] guninski.com>
Jason Copenhaver        <jcopenha [AT] typedef.org>
Eric Perie              <eric.perie [AT] colubris.com>
David Yon               <yon [AT] tacticalsoftware.com>
Marcio Franco           <franco.marcio [AT] rd.francetelecom.fr>
Kaloian Stoilov         <kalkata [AT] yahoo.com>
Steven Lass             <stevenlass [AT] mail.com>
Gregory Stark           <gsstark [AT] mit.edu>
Darren Steele           <steeley [AT] steeley.co.uk>
                        <smhuang [AT] pcs.csie.nctu.edu.tw>
Michael Kopp            <michael.kopp [AT] isarnet.de>
Bernd Leibing           <bernd.leibing [AT] kiz.uni-ulm.de>
Chris Heath             <chris [AT] heathens.co.nz>
Gisle Vanem             <giva [AT] bgnett.no>
Ritchie                 <ritchie [AT] tipsybottle.com>
Aki Immonen             <aki.immonen [AT] golftalma.fi>
David E. Weekly         <david [AT] weekly.org>
Steve Ford              <sford [AT] geeky-boy.com>
Masaki Chikama          <masaki-c [AT] is.aist-nara.ac.jp>
Mohammad Hanif          <mhanif [AT] nexthop.com>
Reinhard Speyerer       <rspmn [AT] arcor.de>
Patrick Kursawe         <phosphan [AT] gentoo.org>
Arsen Chaloyan          <achaloyan [AT] yahoo.com>
                        <melerski [AT] poczta.onet.pl>
Arnaud Jacques          <webmaster [AT] securiteinfo.com>
D. Manzella             <manzella [AT] lucent.com>
Jari Mustajarvi         <jari.mustajarvi [AT] nokia.com>
Joost Yervante Damad    <Joost.Damad [AT] siemens.com>
Pierre Juhen            <pierre.juhen [AT] wanadoo.fr>
David Richards          <drichards [AT] alum.mit.edu>
Shusaku Ueda            <ueda [AT] sra.co.jp>
Jonathan Perkins        <jonathan.perkins [AT] ipaccess.com>
Holger Schurig          <h.schurig [AT] mn-logistik.de>
Peter J. Creath         <peter-ethereal [AT] creath.net>
Magnus Hansson          <mah [AT] hms.se>
Pavel Kankovsky         <kan [AT] dcit.cz>
Nick Black              <dank [AT] reflexsecurity.com>
Bill Guyton             <guyton [AT] bguyton.com>
Chernishov Yury         <Chernishov [AT] iskrauraltel.ru>
Thomas Palmer           <Thomas.Palmer [AT] Gunter.AF.mil>
Clinton Work            <clinton [AT] scripty.com>
Joe Marcus Clarke       <marcus [AT] marcuscom.com>
Kendy Kutzner           <kutzner[AT]tm.uka.de>
James H. Cloos Jr.      <cloos [AT] jhcloos.com>
Tim Farley              <tfarley[AT]iss.net>
Daniel Thompson         <daniel.thompson[AT]st.com>
Chris Jepeway           <thai-dragon[AT]eleven29.com>
Matthew Bradley         <matthew.bradley [AT] cnsonline.net>
Nathan Alger            <nathan [AT] wasted.com>
Stas Grabois            <sagig [AT] radware.com>
Ainsley Pereira         <APereira [AT] Witness.com>
Philippe Mazeau         <philippe.mazeau [AT] swissvoice.net>
Carles Kishimoto        <ckishimo [AT] ac.upc.es>
Dennis Lim              <Dennis.Lim [AT] motorola.com>
                        <postadal [AT] suse.cz>
Martin van der Werff    <martin [AT] vanderwerff.org>
Marco van den Bovenkamp <marco [AT] linuxgoeroe.dhs.org>
Ming Zhang              <mingz [AT] ele.uri.edu>
Neil Piercy             <Neil.Piercy [AT] ipaccess.com>
Remi Denis-Courmont     <courmisch [AT] via.ecp.fr>
Thomas Palmer           <tpalmer [AT] elmore.rr.com>
Ma°rten Svantesson    <f95-msv [AT] f.kth.se>
Thomas Boehne           <TBoehne [AT] ADwin.de>
Steve Sommars           (e-mail address removed at contributor's request)
Kestutis Kupciunas      <kesha [AT] soften.ktu.lt>
Rene Pilz               <rene.pilz [AT] ftw.at>
Laurent Constantin      <laurent.constantin [AT] aql.fr>
Martin Pichlmaier       <martin.pichlmaier [AT] siemens.com>
Mark Phillips           <msp [AT] nortelnetworks.com>
Nils Ohlmeier           <lists [AT] ohlmeier.org>
Ignacio Goyret          <igoyret [AT] lucent.com>
Bart Braem              <bart.braem [AT] gmail.com>
Shingo Horisawa         <name4n5 [AT] hotmail.com>
Lane Hu                 <lane.hu [AT] utstar.com>
Marc Poulhies           <marc.poulhies [AT] epfl.ch>
Tomasz Mrugalski        <thomson [AT] klub.com.pl>
Brett Kuskie            <mstrprgmmr [AT] chek.com>
Brian Caswell           <bmc [AT] sourcefire.com>
Yann                    <yann_eads [AT] hotmail.com>
Jon Ringle              <ml-ethereal [AT] ringle.org>
Julien Leproust         <julien [AT] via.ecp.fr>
Mutsuya Irie            <irie [AT] sakura-catv.ne.jp>
Yoshihiro Oyama         <y.oyama [AT] netagent.co.jp>
Chris Eagle             <cseagle [AT] nps.edu>
Dominique Bastien       <dbastien [AT] accedian.com>
Nicolas Dichtel         <nicolas.dichtel [AT] 6wind.com>
Ricardo Muggli          <ricardo.muggli [AT] mnsu.edu>
Vladimir Kondratiev     <vladimir.kondratiev [AT] gmail.com>
Jaap Keuter             <jaap.keuter [AT] xs4all.nl>
Frederic Peters         <fpeters [AT] debian.org>
Anton Ivanov            <anthony_johnson [AT] mail.ru>
Ilya Konstantinov       <future [AT] shiny.co.il>
Neil Kettle             <mu-b [AT] 65535.com>
Steve Karg              <skarg [AT] users.sourceforge.net>
Javier Acuna            <javier.acuna [AT] sixbell.cl>
Miklos Szurdi           <szurdimiklos [AT] yahoo.com>
Cvetan Ivanov           <zezo [AT] spnet.net>
Vasanth Manickam        <vasanth.manickam [AT] bt.com>
Julian Onions           <julian.onions [AT] gmail.com>
Samuel Thibault         <samuel.thibault [AT] ens-lyon.org>
Peter Kovaƙ            <peter.kovar [AT] gmail.com>
Paul Ollis              <paul.ollis [AT] roke.co.uk>
Dominik Kuhlen          <dkuhlen [AT] gmx.net>
Karl Knoebl             <karl.knoebl [AT] siemens.com>
Maria-Luiza Crivat      <luizacri [AT] gmail.com>
Brice Augustin          <bricecotte [AT] gmail.com>
Matt Thornton           <MATT_THORNTON [AT] appsig.com>
Markus Seehofer         <Markus.Seehofer [AT] hirschmann.de>
Matthias Drochner       <M.Drochner [AT] fz-juelich.de>
Timo Metsala            <timo.metsala [AT] gmail.com>
Manu Pathak             <mapathak [AT] cisco.com>
Kaul                    <mykaul [AT] gmail.com>
John Sullivan           <john [AT] kanargh.force9.co.uk>
Martin Andre            <andre [AT] clarinet.u-strasbg.fr>
Andrei Emeltchenko      <Andrei.Emeltchenko [AT] nokia.com>
Marc Petit-Huguenin     <marc [AT] petit-huguenin.org>
Kirby Files             <kfiles [AT] masergy.com>
Ravi Valmikam           <rvalmikam [AT] airvananet.com>
Diego Petteno           <flameeyes [AT] gentoo.org>
Daniel Black            <dragonheart [AT] gentoo.org>
Christoph Werle         <Christoph.Werle [AT] ira.uka.de>
Aaron Christensen       <aaronmf [AT] gmail.com>
Ian Abel                <ianabel [AT] mxtelecom.com>
Bryant Eastham          <beastham [AT] slc.mew.com>
Taner Kurtulus          <taner.kurtulus [AT] tubitak.gov.tr>
Joe Breher              <linux [AT] q-music.com>
Patrick vd Lageweg      <patrick [AT] bitwizard.nl>
Thomas Sillaber         <Thomas.Sillaber [AT] gmx.de>
Sake Blok               <sake [AT] euronet.nl>
Mike Davies             <m.davies [AT] btinternet.com>

Alain Magloire <alainm[AT]rcsm.ece.mcgill.ca> was kind enough to
give his permission to use his version of snprintf.c.

Dan Lasley <dlasley[AT]promus.com> gave permission for his
dumpit() hex-dump routine to be used.

Mattia Cazzola <mattiac[AT]alinet.it> provided a patch to the
hex dump display routine.

We use the exception module from Kazlib, a C library written by
Kaz Kylheku <kaz[AT]ashi.footprints.net>. Thanks go to him for
his well-written library. The Kazlib home page can be found at
http://users.footprints.net/~kaz/kazlib.html

Henrik Brix Andersen <brix[AT]gimp.org> gave permission for his
webbrowser calling routine to be used.

Christophe Devine <c.devine[at]cr0.net> gave permission for his
SHA1 routines to be used.

snax <snax[AT]shmoo.com> gave permission to use his(?) weak key
detection code from Airsnort.


 

Index

NAME
SYNOPSYS
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS
INTERFACE
MENU ITEMS
WINDOWS
CAPTURE FILTER SYNTAX
DISPLAY FILTER SYNTAX
FILES
SEE ALSO
NOTES
AUTHORS




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