Linux Blog

Packages you should install from the get-go

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:45 pm on Wednesday, December 28, 2011

When re-installing or performing a fresh installs of Linux, I’ve found that packages often disappear from default installations. These are the tools I install from the get-go. I’m sure there is more that I’m missing, next time I re-install I’ll update the list. Feel free to contribute your favorites to the list in the comments!

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THREE POPULAR OPEN SOURCE VERSION CONTROL SYSTEMS

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:30 am on Friday, December 23, 2011

Below, I review CVS, Subversion, and GIT; three popular open source version control systems. Version control systems are an organizational necessity for any software development project. During the software development process, multiple developers are often working with varying versions of the same code. One version may have a particular bug, while another version may have a particular feature. Essentially, a development team begins developing code, creating the first version. From that original trunk, there are various branches where the same versions of the code may be worked on at the same time, perhaps one team working on one particular bug, while another team works on a different one. Once changes are made, they are then committed back to the repository, the repository being where all past and current versions of the code is kept. Keeping track of which version has what is an incredibly important part of the process that allows developers to track bugs, implement new features, and keep the project moving forward. (Read on …)

Automated Scanning with the Shell – UPDATE

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:00 am on Sunday, December 18, 2011

I wrote a little script a while back that would help to automate scanning from the shell.  Mark posted some suggestions that I’ll be implementing in this post. (Read on …)

Ways to install Linux on a netbook

Filed under: General Linux,Linux for Newb's,Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:30 am on Friday, December 16, 2011

With my new Acer Aspire Netbook, it occured to me that it had been a long time since I’d installed Linux on a system without a CDRom. This post outlines some methods you can use to get it installed

(Read on …)

File Transfer Disk Space Tip

Filed under: General Linux,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:44 pm on Monday, December 12, 2011

Disk Space TipI recently got a new computer. Part of the upgrade process was backing up and moving a large amount of data off of my old PC and onto my NAS so that I could sort through it later. One of the annoying things about copying files is it’s difficult to really know how long its going to take, either way I still like to monitor progress when copying or rsyncing data. This post shows two methods of checking your transfer status without the GUI. (Read on …)

New PC

Filed under: Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:27 pm on Monday, December 5, 2011

I ordered a PC a while back and thought I’d write about it. I’ve been running pretty much the same desktop hardware for the past 5 years. Eventually things got so slow on the desktop that I started using my Core 2 Duo Lenovo T61 laptop as my desktop. This worked for a while, and I really like the laptop I just didn’t feel like I was using it for what it was intended for, mobility. I really didn’t want to build if I could avoid it so I started getting specs and prices for computers from the local big box stores and wasn’t really thrilled with anything. I started looking at new PC’s on Amazon, Newegg and TigerDirect. Nothing really jumping out as value / performance there either. At that point was when I decided I’d do what I normally do, break down, buy parts and build. So, my budget was as little as possible, but still wanting decent performance. This is what I came up with: (Read on …)

Dual Boot or Not Dual Boot

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:30 am on Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Billiam-Gates-Romeo-and-JulietHere is a picture of Sir Billiam Gates kissing Claire Danes, Who is supposedly in Charlotte, NC right now filming or something. After making it I thought to myself
well, it doesn’t really fit the whole “Dual Boot” theme.
So I gimped another one up with Richard Stallman as Claire Danes (warning: may scare anyone with a soul…and small children). I am actually somewhat freaked out by the Stallman version and prefer Clare Danes to represent Linux sorry GNU/Linux, so thats the one I included. Two weeks after its creation and after disturbing friends and random old people on the street with it, I decided it was time to write a bit about dual booting. (Read on …)

Review: Acer Aspire One

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:00 am on Friday, September 9, 2011

Acer Aspire One LinuxEarlier this year, I was shopping around for Netbooks and purchased the Acer Aspire One Netbook. I was specifically looking for a Netbook that was fairly small and portable, but with a keyboard that was actually usable. BestBuy had a few, a nice HP with an awesome keyboard…but it only came in hot pink… Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but as I’m not a 13 year old girl, it wasn’t really for me. The oh so helpful sales clerk informed me that, if I really wanted it, I could pay the extra $100 for the exact same thing in blue, but I’d have to wait for as it was out of stock. No thanks. There was a Toshiba with decent specs, but the keyboard wasn’t that great so I skipped on that one too.

The next day I checked out another BestBuy store since that’s all we really have around here, no Fry’s, Nothing! While I was out, I had to pick some stuff up from the nearby Walmart. Yes, yes, I know, I’m fueling the destruction of small businesses, but there are incredibly few options around here. After watching some People Of Walmart candidates, I decided to check out the electronics department. It seemed rather small for a Walmart, tucked right at the back or the store with a TV to employee ration of 50:1. I found the Netbooks, well, one Netbook, The Acer Aspire One, near the other computers. It was $260 which seemed pretty reasonable. When asking the clerk if I could get one unlocked, he told me they had the same one but in black in the storage area for $199. Sold! Most Helpful Walmart Employee Ever.

After removing it from its lunch box sized container, the first thing I noticed was how it looked like Acer had taken notes from Apple with their fancy packaging. That’s cool I suppose. It comes with Windows 7 starter. You’ll probably want to fix that. I tried calling Acer about the refund (hey I didn’t accept the EULA guys) but they didn’t understand my question and tried to step me through reinstalling Windows without a CD Rom. Apparently you have to request the CD from them and buy an external optical drive. I should have messed with them and asked them how to plug my parallel CD burner in, as there is no parallel port.

After booting up and getting thoroughly frustrated with Windows 7 Starter (What the hell, only 3 processes and you can’t change the background), I decided to give that Ubuntu Netbook edition a go. It was only slightly more bearable than Windows 7. Once it was installed, I booted and gave it about five minutes before deciding to install a non netbook specific distribution.
For the size and price, the specs are pretty decent:

10.1″ LED (1024×600)
Intel Atom N450 1.66Ghz, 512KB Cache – Dual Core!
1GB Ram
160GB HD
Intel Chipset
Atheros AR9285 PCI-Express Wireless network adapter

These serve me well for its intended purpose and actually exceeded my expectations. It is perfectly capable of running Virtual Machines with VirtualBox without any noticeable decrease in performance. Pretty much everything worked right out of the box with two exceptions. First, the Ethernet adapter (with Linux) and second, the built in microphone doesn’t work with Skype (on Linux), however an external does. Suspend and Hibernate even work!

Battery life is amazing for the standard 3 cell battery that comes with it. You can buy one with more cells, but I can normally find a power source in the four or more hours I manage to squeeze out of it. Powertop FTW! With the stock battery, it doesn’t weigh too much and is perfect to carry around all day without being a burden. The charger is somewhat small and has a click/snap plug on it. You can position it so that the adapter goes left to right, or top to bottom. The changeable tips also means you can swap them out to use the adapter in different countries (you have to buy them separately though.) Since I couldn’t find the tips I didn’t buy any, but to be honest I didn’t really look. After travelling with it I think the interchangeable tips would be well worth the investment, as it just doesn’t work well with a travel adapter. In England, it worked all-right as long as it was plugged into a surge, but if you plugged it into the wall, it would fall out of the adapter. In France, it didn’t fall out of the travel adapter but rather the travel adapter fell out of the wall. It wouldn’t charge via the adapter in a regular wall outlet, but if I propped it up in the bathroom into the shaver plug it would. I could blame this all on the plug, but to be honest the click/snap tips probably would have fixed it all.
Really, the only things I don’t like about it are the microphone and Ethernet issues (though I think those can be fixed), and the touchpad is entirely too sensitive when typing. You kind of have to type palms up, or be very careful not to touch it or you’ll end up typing somewhere else. You can fix that by getting a USB mouse or by turning the touchpad off temporarily (FN F7). Overall I’m very happy with it and would recommend it to anyone looking for a decent reasonably priced Netbook that can pack a punch.

Lego Tux

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:57 am on Thursday, August 18, 2011

Lego Tux Penguin

As many kids do, I grew up playing with Lego’s, there is something magical about building  with the little plastic bricks. One day I was bored so I Googled Lego Tux’s and found an awesome Lego Tux. It has been around for a while but is still really cool. I don’t have enough bricks to build one and even though there is a Lego store near by, I don’t think that I have the skills to make one without an instruction manual.

Check out: http://www.ericharshbarger.org/lego/penguin.html for more pictures and details!

Linux Apps That Will Help You Graduate College

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:12 am on Monday, August 1, 2011

This is the second guest post written by Whitney from Technected. Whitney majored in journalism and has been using Linux ever since. She now works for a large automotive corporation in the Midwest. In her spare time she enjoys playing video games, gardening and watching Dr. Who.

Linux is a very powerful OS, many people don’t know that. With all the mainstream programs that Microsoft creates, most people remain ignorant of the awesome programs out there for free that are being produced by Linux developers. Many of the apps out there can help you reach your traditional or online degree. Below is a list of 5 that will help you graduate college.

Task Juggler is a project management program. It allows you to keep all your tasks in order. All you have to do is enter in the assignment for class and when it is due as well as any other details that you may find pertinent to getting the project done. It’s especially helpful for online university students, who have less structured classes.

Every college course will have a syllabus and on the syllabus will be assignments that need to be accomplished. Task Juggler can organize this information and keep you on track with your assignments.

Star Office or Oracle Open Office is a regular word program that offers spreadsheet, presentation, drawing, database and formula programs. It is a mirror of Microsoft office but with an original drawing program.

What makes Star Office better than Microsoft Office is its ability to open multiple file types. It can open Microsoft office files as well as Corel WordPerfect files, TXT and HTM. This program may not have the same popularity of Microsoft, but it is free. When having to pay up to $150 on a college budget, Star Office really saves the day.

LyX is a document program that can make several different types of documents. With it, you can make word documents, math documents, science document and many others. This program specifically focuses on the structure of the documents and allows for any type of structure whether it is for a math assignment sheet or a block paragraph science paper.

Obviously you can utilize this program for any class and it beats having to go to the library and using a very specific program. Instead you can download LyX and get all your documents done in one program.

Free Mind is a program that helps you make notes. It is a digital version of the old spider web note taking that many students use for various subjects in school. The main idea rests in the center and then sub topics sprout off of that and then points link off of those.

Another nice point in Free Mind is its ability to fold these sub topics and point back into the main topic, giving Free Mind the ability to reduce clutter. The application allows students to flesh out their ideas for all the papers they will write for class.

Speed Crunch is a powerful desktop calculator that can calculate advanced equations. This isn’t your sissy desktop calculator. This calculator comes with a large screen where you can input long equations as well as define variables for the calculator to produce the correct answer.

For instance, y = x + 41. Enter x = 18 and the calculator does the rest. Speed Crunch has many other useful aspects including syntax highlighting and automatic completion, both will help in reducing errors.

These five Linux applications are great resources for college students or graduates. It’s unfortunate that many out there still don’t realize the abundant, free programs out there that can help them in their daily life, and even help them graduate and better their future.

Open Source Tuning with RomRaider

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, June 22, 2011

RomRaider
This post features RomRaider, an open source software that is used for tuning. Not tuning or optimization in the traditional sense like optimizing shell scripts, but rather automotive tuning, specifically for Subaru’s.

It supports a lot of Subaru models and is able to tune supported ECU’s from various countries.

If you like living on the edge and can get over the risks it would totally be worth it. The consequences may not be for the faint hearted though:

  • An unreadable/unusable ECU.
  • A blown motor and its subsequent damage.
  • Unexpected behavior on the road or track that may cause injury or death to the user as well as others.
  • Violation of local and/or federal laws due to the modification of the factory ECU.

RomRaider is written in Java and is cross platform (Windows/Linux) Sorry Subaru driving Mac owners, you get no love. The interface, although clunky (I mean, it is Java after all) has some pretty cool graphs that display various information in a visually appealing format. If you own a Subaru and are interested in tuning, I’d give RomRaider serious consideration before other commercial solutions.

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