Linux Blog

Parse ifconfig data with shell scripts

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:25 pm on Sunday, June 8, 2008

This week in TheLinuxBlogs.com’s Shell Script Sundays article I’m going to show you how you can use basic UNIX commands to parse networking data. As always there are a number of different methods of achieving this, and I am in no way saying that this is absolutely the way you must do it, or the best way. Its just an example of how you can use shell scripts to your advantage.

Firstly most know that Linux uses the ifconfig command to get information about networking interfaces. If you issue the ifconfig followed by the interface name you get information just about that interface as follows:

# /sbin/ifconfig eth1
eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:35:7F:E2:98 inet addr:192.168.2.13 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: fe80::20e:35ff:fe7f:e298/64 Scope:Link UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:1146 errors:0 dropped:39 overruns:0 frame:0 TX packets:1 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 RX bytes:23748601 (22.6 MiB) TX bytes:507899 (495.9 KiB) Interrupt:11 Base address:0x4000 Memory:fceff000-fcefffff

This information is not in the best format to parse (it has also been distorted by my blogging software.) To solve this problem we are going to search for the whitespaces at the beginning of each line and replaces them with commas. By doing this:

# /sbin/ifconfig eth1 | sed 's/          /,/'
eth1 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:0E:35:7F:E2:98 ,inet addr:192.168.2.13 Bcast:192.168.2.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 ,inet6 addr: fe80::20e:35ff:fe7f:e298/64 Scope:Link ,UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 ,RX packets:1344 errors:0 dropped:39 overruns:0 frame:0 ,TX packets:1 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0 ,collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 ,RX bytes:23809630 (22.7 MiB) TX bytes:507899 (495.9 KiB) ,Interrupt:11 Base address:0x4000 Memory:fceff000-fcefffff

That gives us a nice comma after every line. In order to grab fields from this line the tr command can be used to replace spaces with pipes.

#/sbin/ifconfig eth1 | sed ‘s/ /,/’ | tr [:space:] \|
eth1||||||Link|encap:Ethernet||HWaddr|00:0E:35:7F:E2:98|||,inet|addr:192.168.2.13||Bcast:192.168.2.255||Mask:255.255.255.0|,inet6|addr:|fe80::20e:35ff:fe7f:e298/64|Scope:Link|,UP|BROADCAST|RUNNING|MULTICAST||MTU:1500||Metric:1|,RX|packets:1765|errors:0|dropped:39|overruns:0|frame:0|,TX|packets:1|errors:0|dropped:0|overruns:0|carrier:0|,collisions:0|txqueuelen:1000||,RX|bytes:23941275|(22.8|MiB)||TX|bytes:507899|(495.9|KiB)|,Interrupt:11|Base|address:0x4000|Memory:fceff000-fcefffff|||

Now that the fields are all delimited properly, lets use the cut command to grab a line from this. Since I am interested in the RX and TX bytes I’m going to grab data from line 8 by using the cut command as follows:

#/sbin/ifconfig eth1 | sed 's/          /,/' | tr [:space:] \| | cut -d , -f 8
RX|bytes:24014818|(22.9|MiB)||TX|bytes:507899|(495.9|KiB)|

That gave us a nice line of output which is easy to parse even further by using the cut command. You will notice the fields are delimited by a pipe (the | character) and are not always consistent since we replaced all spaces with a pipe. Take a look at the first two fields RX|bytes: This means that to get the RX bytes in bytes we need to cut yet again. Since I’m not to bothered about Bytes and the largest number is delimeted in fields 3 and 4 I will concentrate on those.

#/sbin/ifconfig eth1 | sed 's/          /,/' | tr [:space:] \| | cut -d , -f 8 | cut -d \| -f 3-4
(23.0|MiB)

This is a nice RX MiB output yet it has one last problem, the pipe between the characters. Sed can be used to replace this and any other characters if you wish. Just issue a sed find and replace like this:

#/sbin/ifconfig eth1 | sed 's/          /,/' | tr [:space:] \| | cut -d , -f 8 | cut -d \| -f 3-4 | sed 's/|/ /'
(23.0 MiB)

That looks good for now. If you would like more information on how to parse data regarding this post or any other you can always leave me a comment and I’ll try my best to help. Especially if we can post the results on TheLinuxBlog in another Shell Script Sundays Article. Thanks for reading The Linux Blog and come back soon!