Linux Blog

REVOLUTION OS: A REVIEW

Filed under: Linux for Newb's — aaron at 7:42 am on Tuesday, December 30, 2008

Well, it seems as though I’ve managed to find a way to fill up the HDD’s on both my mac lappys.  Tried installing Ubuntu on the G4, but I’ve currently been using it as something of a Media PC and though my files are backed up, it’s the only computer in the apartment that I can hook up to my TV (that works anyway). 

Tried partitioning the HDD on the G4, but I don’t have enough space for UBUNTU (quite a bit of space for a Linux distro.)  However, I DO have an old TOSHIBA lappy sitting around without a screen that works (though the video card works, so video out, yay). I’m just going to wipe it and hook it up to a monitor, learn that way I guess.  This I’ll do later today (it’s 6:04am).  

Went by the library today and picked up a few Linux newb books (no LINUX FOR DUMMIES, I WAS SADDENED). So I’ll be reading that.  In the meantime, here’s a review for a documentary about Linux I just got my hands on, relatively speaking.  The documentary: REVOLUTION OS.

So, what can I say about this flick other than I’ve watched it twice now and it seems like it’d be a pretty good documentary for someone (like yours truly) dipping his toe into the wide wide world of Linux.  It’s somewhat of a history lesson more than a “this is how you get started” lesson.  The reason I’ve watched it twice, other than it being intriguing, is so I could take notes the second time ’round to get a better idea of what I could tell you guys about it.

We start off with something of a cocaphony of talking heads, Eric Raymond (author of THE CATHEDRAL AND THE BAZAAR) and BRUCE PERENS (author of the OPEN SOURCE DEFINITION, along with some guys at DEBIAN), going on about this and that, not really making much sense at first.  Then we dive into the history lesson. 

We skip all of the AT&T Unix development and head straight into Stallman and his work on AI at MIT.  At some point he became frustrated with passwords and Operating systems he couldn’t work with.  He quit his job at MIT and began working on GNU (something I’ve discussed earlier).  The problem with GNU is that the FREE SOFTWARE camp had created all that was needed for a working Operating System, but lacked a working, debugged Kernel.  

This is where our good pal Linus came in, saw the GNU software and decided to write a workable, monolithic KERNEL when, combined with the GNU software, gave birth to what we have all come to know as an early stage of Linux. 

Flawed, of course, at first, but working and, believing in the GPL, he distributed this software.  That’s when things really became interesting.  As people all over the world got their hands on this Open Source code, they were able to mess around with it, play with it, improve upon it, and before long, we began to see multiple variations, each an improvement or failure upon the other.

Stallman, of course, played the part of a d-bag, for certain, and there followed all sort of revelations upon the history of linux, the evolution, etc.  I’m not going to continue rambling on about it.  All I can say is, if you have an interest in Linux, whether new or old, this is definitely a flick you’ve got to check out.  So, rent it, download it, do what you’ve gotta do, but I’m tellin’ ya, check it out.  It’s one step closer(for me anyway) to understanding.

Anyway, I’ve got some sleep to catch on, followed up by installation on that Toshiba and a great amount of reading, so, check out REVOLUTION OS.  I give it 4 out of 5 penguins.

Until next time, fellow newbs…





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2 Comments »

Comment by TheLinuxBlog.com

January 16, 2009 @ 12:38 pm

Never watched this before glad you brought it to my attention, it really is a good flick for those interested on how it all happened.

Comment by dockraz

March 11, 2009 @ 3:09 pm

sort of a dumb question – but what books for linux did you buy?

And if you’ve read them – have they been worth it?

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