Linux Blog

Freemind Vs. Kdissert

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Wednesday, October 20, 2010

FreeMind vs kdissert

Mind mapping is a great way to get all of your thoughts out. There are two major competitors when it comes to mind mapping on Linux.

In the blue corner we have reigning champion FreeMind and in the red corner we have a new contender for the best mind mapping software kkkkkkkkkkkdissert.

FreeMind Vs kdissert…. Fight. (Read on …)

Impressed with the PostgreSQL Installer

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:48 am on Monday, April 27, 2009

Until today I had never installed PostgreSQL from the Binary provided at postgresql.org since it’s pretty much always in some form of repository provided by most distributions. Today, for the first time ever I installed it and have to say I’m very impressed with the installer. I some what shuddered as I saw a “install shield” type installer interface, as my past encounters with these have generally tended to not work out so well. What I noticed about the PostgreSQL installer though was different from the “install shield”, it was BitRock. BitRock is a cross platform installer for “Windows, Linux, OS X and more…” as this was my first experience with BitRock with a Linux machine I have to say it was a positive one. It allowed me to install PostgreSQL with some custom components pretty effortlessly. While most won’t need to do a custom installation as PostgreSQL will probably be in a repository, its handy to know that the installer works.

BitRock does not appear to have a completely free license but they do seem to give open source projects a “free copy.” Not sure how I feel about this, but I guess if they’re out to make money then it could work for them. Apparentely it doesn’t take much to please me on a mundane Monday morning, I’d have been perfectly fine with a tarball and manual configuration but the GUI has brightened up my day. Thanks BitRock! Does any one else have any encounters or shocking experience with installers? What about BitRock in general?

Keeping your Firefox Bookmarks Synced

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:37 am on Thursday, July 3, 2008

Keeping your FireFox bookmarks synced between multiple computes is a great concept. We sync everything else from e-mail to contacts to music so why not keep our bookmarks in a central location? In this post I’ll describe the method I’ve been using without any problems for the past three months or so. Feel free to contribute how you achieve the same thing. The only requirement for me is that the bookmarks be cross platform, so I can log into any sort of machine that runs FireFox and view my bookmarks.

I looked into using sshfs to sync my bookmarks folder also, but this seemed like a lot of work. So I decided to scout out the online bookmarking services. There are the big ones like del.icio.us, Google bookmarks and then countless other smaller ones. The major ones looked promising, so it was difficult to choose one. The deciding factor for me was the actual FireFox plugin its self. The GMarks plugin for FireFox seems to be very stable and simple to use. It works well on Windows, Linux and MacOSX. It has an export feature and is based off of the Google Bookmarks service so I don’t have to worry about losing my bookmarks.

Check out: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/2888 for more information and screenshots.

Facts About Selenium

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:22 pm on Friday, March 28, 2008

Selenium is a chemical element. What you may not know is that Selenium is also a powerful testing tool for web applications. Selenium runs its tests directly in a browser, just like real users do. It is cross platform and the developers plan to have it for the iPhone but thats another story. Selenium can run in one of two modes Core and Remote Control (RC). The RC method has a way of using distributed computing much like the way Samba allows cross compiling over multiple cpu’s. There is an IDE for Selenium that can be used to easily learn Selenium.

Enough Facts About Selenium already!

What exactly can you do with Selenium?

Well, the answer is simple. Pretty much anything that you can do with a browser Selenium can do. Its primary purpose is for developers to use as a quality assurance tool. For QA purposes you can create a test cases, run them and verify that the end result is what you expected. You can create test cases in Java, Ruby, Python, Perl, PHP or .NET.

I had a little trouble getting the Selenium driver for PHP installed so here is the how to:

sudo su
pear channel-update pear.php.net
pear install Testing_Selenium-beta
pear install PHPUnit
exit

The above allowed me to communicate with the Selenium Remote Control that I downloaded with PHP. Here is an example from their website that I have modified so that it works:

<?php

set_include_path(get_include_path() . PATH_SEPARATOR . ‘./PEAR/’);
require_once ‘Testing/Selenium.php’;
require_once ‘PHPUnit/TestCase.php’;

class GoogleTest
{
private $selenium;

public function setUp()
{
$this->selenium = new Testing_Selenium(“*firefox”, “http://www.google.com”);
$this->selenium->start();
}

public function tearDown()
{
$this->selenium->stop();
}

public function testGoogle()
{
$this->selenium->open(“/”);
$this->selenium->type(“q”, “hello world”);
$this->selenium->click(“btnG”);
$this->selenium->waitForPageToLoad(10000);
$this->testCase(“/Google Search/”, $this->selenium->getTitle());
echo “<hr>”;
$this->testCase(“/Yeahh Search/”, $this->selenium->getTitle());

}

public function testCase($regEx, $string) {

preg_match($regEx, $string, $matches);

print_r($matches);

}

}

$google = new GoogleTest();

$google->setUp();
$google->testGoogle();
$google->tearDown();
?>

Before attempting to run this you must make sure that you downloaded Selenium RC and that it is running. Selenium runs on Java so make sure that Java is installed download selenium from here, unzip and run the following in the directory that it is extracted to:

cd selenium-remote-control-1.0-beta-1
cd selenium-server-1.0-beta-1
java -jar selenium-server.jar -interactive

Once this is running you can start scripting with PHP to get Selenium to do anything that you want. Once you are done make sure that you exit the Selenium server by running the “exit” at the prompt.

I’m sorry about the format of this post, its been a while since I have used Selenium and I’m quite excited about it. If you have any questions about Selenium post them here and I will try to answer them for you.