Linux Blog

Fedora Menu Bug

Filed under: Linux Video Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:24 am on Friday, November 5, 2010

Here is a video of a little bug in Gnome that I stumbled across. I’m fairly sure it is something to do with my vertical resolution since it is kind of low. I’m wondering if it will still be an issue after the next update.

Connect to Wireless using NetworkManager

Filed under: Linux Video Tutorials,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 am on Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Here’s an old video I made that demonstrates how to connect to a wireless network using NetworkManager.
(Read on …)

Excuses, QLandkarte, BOFH and Devscripts

Filed under: General Linux — Owen at 8:32 pm on Monday, April 12, 2010

After not writing for a little while (I call it writers block, you can call it lazy) I decided to do what any Linux Geek would do. I searched two different distributions software repositories for excuses. Fedora and Debian had quite different but interesting outputs.

Fedora’s came up with QLandkarte GT which is a GPS tool that replaces .

QLandkarte GT is the ultimate outdoor aficionado’s tool for GPS maps in GeoTiff format as well as Garmin’s img vector map format. Additional it is the PC side frontend to QLandkarte M, a moving map application for mobile devices. And it fills the gap Garmin leaves in refusing to support Linux. QLandkarte GT is the proof that writing portable applications for Unix, Windows and OSX is feasible with a minimum of overhead. No excuses!

Debian on the other hand came up with two results one more entertaining than the other, but both useful. The first being a package called devscripts that are

scripts to make the life of a Debian Package maintainer easier

The second package is what I can describe as an awesome find for excuses “fortunes-bofh-excuses”. If you like BOFH or fortunes and have a twisted sense of humour I’m sure you’ll love this package.

If you get a chance and run a different distribution, I’d love to see the packages that come up for it. I was really trying to find something that would help me get a little more organized, or add a little more confusion to my workday. Mission Successful, feel free to flame.

Red5 On Fedora 11 Howto

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:05 am on Tuesday, September 22, 2009

This is how I quickly set up the Red5 streaming server for testing and evaluation. It worked on Fedora 11 and older Fedoras, and it might work on other distributions, or it may not. Here’s how I did it.

Downloaded the latest Java JDK:

(Read on …)

Tether iPhone through the cable, on Linux

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:02 am on Thursday, August 20, 2009

So you got an iPhone huh? perhaps you’ve got an SSH client and maybe you jailbroke your iPhone and have done some iPhone wifi tethering (That’s not the best way, and not free), but have you been able to use SSH through the cable? Me neither until a little while ago.

The benefits of connecting by the cable are slightly obvious to anyone who wants to do it:

BATTERY!
With your phone plugged in, you’ll get better battery life, or perhaps just prevent the battery from getting discharged any further.

No Wifi Setup
This was really the biggest problem for me, having to reconfigure wifi on my laptop then getting the laptop and phone to talk. Some times wireless connections mysteriously dropped or just acted plain funky. Any one who’s ever typed in a WEP key on the iPhone also knows what a pain it is, so not having to use Wifi is a plus.

Privacy
Since the cable is used, there should be no wireless network for others to fool around with.

Data Transfer Rates
I have not yet confirmed this, mostly because I’m lazy, partly because I don’t have the time to produce any stats but, 480Mbps with USB2.0 Vs. a theoretical 54Mbps on 802.11G

Enough already, how do I do it?
Thanks to Jing Su there is a LGPL’d piece of software called itunnel that can be found here. Installing itunnel will vary by distribution. It’s fairly straight forward on Fedora, provided you have the library libiphone installed you should be able to download, untar, make, and run.

Once you’ve installed itunnel, you run it by using:

sudo itunnel <port>

If you don’t specify a port it listens on port 3023.

Connect to localhost using your normal SSH Socks proxy method -D <port> and your username, default being mobile with your new port.

 ssh -D <yourport> -p 3023 mobile@localhost

Type “Yes” to accept the fingerprint (you may need to eventually change your fingerprint when you upgrade your phone) and then type in your password which should NOT be “alpine”, because you did change it right?

Once you’re SSH’d in, you can set up your browser to use the socks proxy as you would with Wifi tether version on the port you specified with -D.

There you have it, a way to Tether your iPhone through the cable on Linux! Rumor, (well not really a rumor, since I’ve used itunnel.exe) has it that this also works with a Windows box, just try to find a non-virus infected version of the iTunnel suite.

Happy Hacking!

Fedora Classroom – Go Learn something!

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:46 am on Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Want to learn about Linux for free? Well, Fedora has a thing called the Fedora classroom which holds classes that teach a group about related technologies. As a casual Fedora user, I find the classes useful but I’m a little bummed that I’ve missed a couple of lessons that I’ve wanted to take in the past.

However tonight, at 9:00 EST (1:00 UTC) Kevin Fenzi is going to be hosting a class on PreUpgrade which is a pretty neat project. I might try to jump on if I get the time, if not it will be reading the chat logs and documentation for me.

For more information on any upcoming classes, or archives of old classes visit https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Classroom and be sure to bookmark it for future reference.

I’d love to see video or slides along with the classes. Has anyone taken any of these classes or have any thoughts on them?

Fedora 11 Upgrade from Alpha to Beta

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:56 am on Wednesday, April 1, 2009

After my mistake downloading the Alpha, I was able to update to the Beta by doing some pretty basic stuff.

First to aid I set up sudo, and changed my default run level to 3. I installed bash-completion (a mandatory package) and then changed to run level 3 with telinit. Once down to a reasonable run level for a systems upgrade, yum update -y was issued. I believe this failed, so I read the release notes and did the yum –skip-broken update command. It was rather scary since the broken libraries were glibc’s and those can be a pain. After a hour or more I was back to the prompt. Another yum update -y just to make sure and I was ready to reboot.

Rebooting actually worked first time and my Fedora was updated from 10.91 to 10.92. Using this method does not give you ext4 but, at least it will upgrade you to the latest Beta. Now, if only my production installation upgrades would have gone this smoothly.

Run Levels in a Nutshell

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:03 am on Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Run levels in Linux are a great thing. Basically, a run level is by definition a configuration for a group of processes. The run levels and default run level is specified in /etc/inittab. Most Linux systems these days, with exception of a few boot into run level 5 which is generally a graphical user interface such as KDM or GDM. The others boot into run level 3 most servers will boot into this run level which is multi-user with networking but no X, and is many users preference.

To define what run level your system boots into by default you would edit the /etc/inittab file and edit the line similar to:

id:5:initdefault:

This is run level 5, if you wanted to switch to command line you’d change the 5 to 3 and vice versa.

If your not ready to make the jump yet but would like to check it out, you can (as root) use the command telinit to tell init to change run level. If you are in run level 5, try (be prepared to lose everything in X, as it will kill everything for you)

telinit 3

If you are doing maintenance, you may want to switch to level 1 which is single user mode. Level 2 on Fedora is the same as 3 except it doesn’t have NFS support.

Level 0 is halt and run level 6 is reboot which are the best ones to accidentally set as a default run level (trust me on this one.) For more information on the different run levels check out the man pages.

Fix For Grub Problem After Fedora Update

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:06 am on Tuesday, February 24, 2009

After updating a Fedora installation a development server froze sitting there with GRUB on the screen at boot.
It had been like this all night after a successful upgrade earlier that day. yum update was run from a screen session and then connected to from home. What had caused the problem was the kernel and possibly grub had been updated. This caused the system to need a reboot, but after the reboot the drive map had changed.

Fortunately when I came in the next morning I had an e-mail with a link to this website: http://readlist.com/lists/redhat.com/fedora-list/51/259917.html with a solution to the problem.

Here are the step by step instructions since they are not clearly lined out on the site:

1) Insert Fedora installation media
2) boot to rescue mode
3) choose language, skip network settings
4) once you are at a shell, type:
5) grub –device-map=/tmp/drivemap
6) quit
7) vi,pico or nano /tmp/drivemap and move sda and sdb around, or perhaps hda.
8) chroot /mnt/sysimage
9) I had checked that /tmp/drivemap had stayed the same by running cat /tmp/drivemap
10) grub –device-map=/tmp/drivemap
11) quit
12) grub-install
13) reboot

After grub gave its usual message I rebooted, removed the CD and everything worked as expected. Excellent. I’ve always used lilo over grub, but recently the distributions I’ve been using use grub and more importantly the servers I manage. Therefore I guess I better get more accustomed to grub. Luckily the server this went wrong on was a development server and nothing mission critical, so thankfully no one had to make the long haul into the data center to fix this issue at 1:00am. Hopefully you will be just as lucky if you run into this issue.

Fedora 9 Thunderbird Update Fix

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 am on Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Fedora 9 Thunderbird
While updating a Fedora 9 installation I ran across an error. The error was with the Mozilla Thunderbird package that I use on a regular basis.
The error looked like this:

Running Transaction
Updating : thunderbird 1/2
Error unpacking rpm package thunderbird-2.0.0.19-1.fc9.i386
error: unpacking of archive failed on file /usr/lib/thunderbird-2.0.0.19/dictionaries: cpio: rename

Obviously any fix that I implemented couldn’t loose my mail. The problem was with the dictionaries more specifically the /usr/lib/thunderbird-2.0.0.19/dictionaries file. The error is not very specific but lets us know its having trouble unpacking the archive and ends with cpio: rename. So here is what I did to solve the problem:

cd /usr/lib/thunderbird-2.0.0.19/
sudo mv dictionaries dictionaries-old

Thunderbird data is stored in ~/.thunderbird it is advisable you make a backup of your mail if it is that important to you. I didn’t since this directory is a library directory and all of my mail can be downloaded again with imap. If you use pop you may want to consider doing a backup. After doing this it fixed Thunderbird and I’m all up to date. Horray!

Let me know if it worked for you and I’ll let you all know if there are any problems.

ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL LINUX PART DEUX

Filed under: Linux for Newb's — aaron at 6:18 am on Friday, January 2, 2009

Ok, where’d I leave off.  Oh yeah, at the asscrack of dawn on the 31st…failing, as one would expect from a “newb.”  Believe many of my problems may actually be hardware related on some level, but cannot decipher the main cause. Optical Drive is the most likely candidate.  Moving on.

12/31/2009
9:51pm  Compy DBAN’d, attempting install of UBUNTU release 8.10 again.  Background looks like a blood smear in DEADSPACE. “Partitions Formatting” – ext3 again – 5% again.  Let’s see if it goes any further…15%…Scanning Files.  Copying files at 22%, I get excited, but, you know, not in that way.

10:02pm  INSTALLATION FAILED. Error copying files to HDD [Errno5].  Multitude of causes include a faulty optical drive, bad HDD, too hot, I call BS and go with the last possible cause “burn speed.”

11:18pm  Attempting to install UBUNTU 8.10 at 8x burn speed. Optical Drive churning away. Background up, beginning installation, FROZEN at Partitioner.  Failure.  Time to celebrate the New Year with lotsa drinkin’.

01/01/2009

1:59am  Frustrated with UBUNTU, I’m experimenting with a liveCD of a release called BERRY.  The Desktop Background is a kitten melded into a desert wasteland.  Written in the lower left margin of the screen is “THE MOST BEAUTIFUL O/S IN THE WORLD.” If by beautiful, I hope they mean the code because this….this is just apalling. Oh FRACK, I click some random gear button and up pops another kitten.  This Distro was developed by Satan and his demon buddies…and possibly Kevin Rose.  Ok, big NO and big waste of time.

3:34am  Still a no go on the UBUNTU front.  What is the fracking problem?!?!?!11?  Will continue to hack away at it.

5:32am  Browsed around on the intarwebz and came across the FEDORA distribution 10.  Burning it at 16x and installing.  FAILURE.

01/02/2009

4:32pm   Attempting installation of FEDORA 10 again. SUCCESS, FINALLY SUCCESS, I NOW HAVE A SYSTEM RUNNING LINUX (though I wish it were a laptop so I could tinker with it in my recliner as opposed to on this monstrosity of a former laptop with a possible bad optical drive and as opposed to working in my office where it is less than comfortable given certain medical conditions).  UH OH, a pop up tells me there’s a kernel error.  BAH! I sent a report off to the FEDORA folk, this may seem interesting in the future  if I run into a problem; at that point I may be able to fix it.

5:00pm  Ok…so, Fedora 10 seems like…any other operating system really. I’m writing this post on the intarwebz (@ 5:12am) on it.  I’ll just have to tinker with it more I suppose.  As Fedora is supposed to be based off Red Hat, certain knowledge I acquire may assist me in future endeavours (MONEY).  Don’t get me wrong, I like the nice, clean GUI with the blue burning sun ‘n all, but…I want to get down to the nitty-gritty as they say around here.  I want to learn command line functions.  I also want to start learning more about programming languages such as C++ (antiquated or not), PERL, JAVA, etc.  I want to be able to do what SNIDE does on a day to day basis and type in a few commands and have complete control over my machine (or someone elses, heh).  It’s all going to take time though.  Time.  Crap, The time setting is wrong on this thing, I have to fix that, oh, and they make it really easy.  Where’s the fun in that?

Until next time fellow NEWBS.

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