Linux Blog

Auto Clean-up Downloaded Files

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:37 am on Sunday, January 4, 2015

This week I went through my downloads folder, cleaning up erroneous files. In light of that I’ll share a quick tip on how to clean up the multiple copies of files that inevitably pile up. The issue is, when you save a file from firefox or Chrome, the next time you download the file, it just makes another copy with (1) or (2). I have a number of these on multiple systems, so hit the jump for a quick snippet, and explanation.
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GNU find – A Multidimensional Tool

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Tuesday, November 30, 2010

This is a guest post by Usama Hashimi. Usama is currently a student of MPhil in Economics and enjoys Learning about Linux, Surfing the Internet, watching movies and Listening to Music.

Beginners are mostly afraid of the command prompt. Whenever they see one, they immediately say “it’s very difficult”. But it’s not true. The command prompt is just as friendly as GUI, provided you use it with proper procedure.
Most people use GUI tools to search for their lost files. They don’t even know that they can use command line tools to search their files. GNU ‘find’ is such like a tool which can not only search files but can even copy, move or delete these files on the fly.
So let’s see that how ‘find’ works.
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Linux find command

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Sunday, November 7, 2010

linux find command

For those a little scared of the terminal using the Linux find command may seem a little daunting. To be honest though the find command really isn’t that hard to get the hang of. By effectively learning and using the Linux find command you’ll open up a whole new can of searching capabilities. You’ll increase your capabilities, boost productivity, and be more likely to find what your looking for. Alright, enough of the pep talk already and lets get to the core that is the powerful Linux find command.

(Read on …)