Linux Blog

Syncing your Delicious Bookmarks

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:24 am on Friday, December 11, 2009

I’ve written about syncing your bookmarks on Linux before.

I’ve been using the method with GMarks and the Google Toolbar plugin for some time and it works just fine. I also have a Delicious account that I use for work, that I like to access and save book marks to from any computer., this is where SimpleDelicious comes into play.

Simple and seamless delicious bookmarks management from your FireFox browser menu. Unlike others it’s aimed to be simple to use and not bloated with invasive and unnecessary features.
features:

-Add and delete delicious tags/bookmarks from the browser menu, as simple as that

And it really it is, it’s a quick install then enter your account information and you’re good to go. I find the sorting on it is a little strange as it organizes by tags rather than folders, but it works. If you remember where you put something or have a good organizing system (unlike my assortment of random tags that seemed like a good idea at the time) you’ll always be able to find what you’re looking for. You can always use the web front end to search and organize your bookmarks if you have to, but this firefox plugin makes syncing and adding to your delicious bookmarks easy!

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Are You Funding Open Source?

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:24 am on Friday, August 29, 2008

I was using a piece of software that I had heard about a while back that manages collections. Its called Tellico and is actually quite good. While using Tellico I discovered that when you click on the “Amazon link” for the product, it has an affiliate code in it.

For those of you who don’t know what an affiliate program is, its basically a way for people to make money just by refering people to products. Most of the big guys have these sorts of “programs” including Amazon. Affiliate programs are very popular in the triple X industry.

What frustrates me is that this is included in Tellico, so in effect when you visit a product from your own personal collection, Tellico gets a percentage of sales from Amazon for any other items you purchase. While the affiliate link doesn’t bother me so much as it can be changed (and I also participate in the program), its the fact that it came right out of the Fedora repositories like this.

What about if Ubuntu reworked its software and included affiliate links for everything? Perhaps a FireFox plugin that manipulated all Amazon requests to include Mandriva’s affiliate link. I think that this is against Amazons terms of service but this method is a potential way for open source developers and organizations to get some additional funding. But is it right? Preying on your end users ignorance for profit? Although it doesn’t harm anything is it moral?

Post Source: http://www.TheLinuxBlog.com

Before you complain / ask about Java

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:44 am on Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Before you ask why your Java applications don’t work, or why your applet doesn’t initialize in Firefox, Seamonkey or Whatever browser you use do you know what version of Java you are using?

“Yes, I installed the JRE 1.6.0_XX”,

Thats nice, but is it running? Now, it may seem as obvious as “Is your computer on?”  to some, but to others and I admit myself it isn’t always that obvious. I had installed the Java Runtime /JDK and tested my firefox. Programs worked from the command line, java -version provided me the correct Java version, but why were my applets failing to load?

The firefox plugin is the answer. Open up about:plugins in firefox and take a look at the Java providers. If you don’t see the Java(TM) plugin there then there is a problem. Refer to the Correct Java documentation on how to get this corrected. Basically you symlink a file and disable the other Java providers.

Keeping your Firefox Bookmarks Synced

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:37 am on Thursday, July 3, 2008

Keeping your FireFox bookmarks synced between multiple computes is a great concept. We sync everything else from e-mail to contacts to music so why not keep our bookmarks in a central location? In this post I’ll describe the method I’ve been using without any problems for the past three months or so. Feel free to contribute how you achieve the same thing. The only requirement for me is that the bookmarks be cross platform, so I can log into any sort of machine that runs FireFox and view my bookmarks.

I looked into using sshfs to sync my bookmarks folder also, but this seemed like a lot of work. So I decided to scout out the online bookmarking services. There are the big ones like del.icio.us, Google bookmarks and then countless other smaller ones. The major ones looked promising, so it was difficult to choose one. The deciding factor for me was the actual FireFox plugin its self. The GMarks plugin for FireFox seems to be very stable and simple to use. It works well on Windows, Linux and MacOSX. It has an export feature and is based off of the Google Bookmarks service so I don’t have to worry about losing my bookmarks.

Check out: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/2888 for more information and screenshots.

Slackware 12 – MPlayer Setup in 3 Easy Steps

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:46 am on Thursday, September 6, 2007

I made a quick installer script that will install MPlayer 1.0rc1 with the essential codecs pack and the Firefox plugin on a new installation of Slackware 12. With this script you should be able to get MPlayer set up on Slackware 12 in 3 easy steps.

1. Download The MPlayer Installer that I made (Right click Save Link As).
2. Change to root user and run the MPlayer Installer OR run the MPlayer Installer with sudo as followed:

bash-3.1$ su root
Password:
bash-3.1# sh mplayer_setup.sh

OR

sudo sh mplayer_setup.sh

3. If everything installed smoothly you can remove the mplayer directory and all files inside it. If it failed then all you need to do is (as root) removepkg on all of the .tgz files and do a rm /usr/lib/codecs/*.

Firefox should be restarted after the script has run. Test Firefox by going to various media sites, one I like to use is Apple Trailers (Because of the quality and speed). If you could contact me and let me know if the installer worked or failed I would appreciate it.

Line by line breakdown of the installer:

mkdir mplayer; cd mplayer;

Creates the mplayer directory and moves into it.

wget http://www2.linuxpackages.net/packages/Slackware-12.0/X11/MPlayer/mplayer-1.0rc1-i486-1goa.tgz; installpkg mplayer-1.0rc1-i486-1goa.tgz

Gets the mplayer-1.0rc1-i486 package from linuxpackages.net then installs the package

wget http://www2.linuxpackages.net/packages/Slackware-12.0/Library/mplayerplug-in/mplayerplug-in-3.45-i686-1amg.tgz; installpkg mplayerplug-in-3.45-i686-1amg.tgz

Gets the mplayer plug-in for Firefox and installs it

wget http://www4.mplayerhq.hu/MPlayer/releases/codecs/essential-20061022.tar.bz2

Downloads the essential codecs pack from mplayerhq.hu

tar xvjf essential-20061022.tar.bz2; mv essential-20061022/* /usr/lib/codecs; rm -rf essential-20061022

extracts the essential codecs package to one of the directories MPlayer looks for codecs in and removes the directory.