Linux Blog

Linux Tunneling Techniques

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:59 am on Wednesday, November 10, 2010


Video completely unrelated.
Ever tunneled or used tunneling for mobile Internet? Perhaps you have needed to otherwise tunnel to bypass a restrictive firewall or for a secure channel on an insecure wireless network. It seems that everyone knows how to tunnel using the ssh socks support and how to use Firefox’s about:config screen to set it to use a socks and remote DNS. While this is great for occasional web browsing it only takes you so far.

tsocks is a great application to let you tunnel other programs over socks. Its easy to install on most distributions and allows you to use many command line applications. I’ve used it on a number of occasions successfully and while it does its job its not the the best solution. This is because it was last updated in 2002 and doesn’t perform DNS lookups. I found myself using it to SSH to an IP address (memorized, or looked up through another SSH session) and using applications on the remote server.

proxychains is a bit of a better tunneling solution, it works the similarly to tsocks but It also resolves DNS and can chain multiple proxies. I’ve used it on numerous occasions with great success. ssh, lynx, lftp, irssi and a whole bunch of others work without any problems. Another plus is it has also been updated in the last 5 years (but not by much.)

One application I haven’t yet had the pleasure of trying on the desktop is 3proxy. I have used it on the iPhone but ended up using the ssh socks method more often. From its yum description and feature list, it sounds very promising and one definitely worth looking into.

Speaking from experience I know its kind of difficult to browse your distributions web repositories to find the files you need and install them (I had to do this since I didn’t have them) so I recommend you download these applications and save yourself some time before you need them on the road.

Things I can do before Windows Boots

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:38 am on Monday, June 28, 2010

I guess I’m one of the lucky ones that gets to use Linux at work. The kicker is, I need Windows to do part of my work so I have two machines. After a recent power outage, I needed to boot both machines this morning. So, I thought I’d document what I did before Windows booted.

  1. Turned both machines on
  2. Cleaned 3 coffee mugs and came back
  3. Talked to my boss about the power outage
  4. Logged into my Linux machine
  5. Started all the software I thought I might need for the day (Pidgin, Thunderbird, Firefox, Eclipse, Tilda and screen)
  6. Checked my e-mail
  7. Approved some comments on this blog
  8. Wrote this blog post.

On that note, my Windows machine is about booted and I can load up the Word documents that were inconveniently sent to me in .docx format. What a Monday Morning.

Interesting Finds

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:11 pm on Friday, October 3, 2008

This week I’ve been particularly slacking on this blog. However I did get to talk to the guys over at Linux Cranks. Throughout the week I found some interesting stuff on the web. Most of its Linux or tech related so if you’re interested … (Read on …)

Links -g Graphical links

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — Kaleb at 12:01 am on Tuesday, February 5, 2008

Hello I am Kaleb Porter from http://kps-blog.blogspot.com writing a post here about links -g, the graphical text web browser. I am sure your asking your self by now, “graphical text web browser? that makes no sense.” well your pretty much right.

What links -g is, is the text based web browser “links” in it’s own X window. This gives it the ability to display images which is very neat actually.

links -g google
Neat right?
Links -g still uses the same old links keys that we are used to from our cli versions that we love so dear. And if you don’t use gpm, you can now use your mouse along with your browser. However if your experienced with gpm this feature may be old news to you.So your asking yourself, “Why the hell do I care about this?” well links -g is an amazingly fast web browser. So if your like me and completely upset at the horrid speed of today’s full featured web browsers… Opera, Firefox, or if your in MacOS Safari, and IE for Windows, then you will love the super fast speed of links -g. Also if your the type of person I am who just flat out likes the simple stuff, or the power user using a nice tiling window manager like dwm or something and you want to be able to display images in your web browser, then you will love links -g.

Sounds great eh? Well it truly is there are drawbacks however most of who will want to use links -g don’t mind these so called drawbacks.
1. Flash.
OK OK so it doesn’t support flash playback…big deal, hey it’s a TEXT based web browser that just happens to be running in X so to support images. You have to give it credit for doing that. And doing that very well.
2. No built in file browser.
OK for this you might be wondering, “What file browser in my web browser?” Well there is a file browser in Web browsers such as Firefox and Opera. These file browsers allow you do do things like pick a file you want to upload to say Photobucket or something. It can still be done, you just need to know where on your system, the file you want to upload is.
3. Other animation software (Java… etc.)
Well you can’t just expect this thing to have support for super cool animation effects from Java because it just doesn’t have a Java plug-in. Note that this is NOT Javascript. Javascript and Java are two different technologies. Javascript is fully supported under links -g.

To install:

In Gentoo:
Make sure you have the proper use flags set up….(png, jpeg, svga, tiff, javascript, X, and ssl if you want it.

emerge -av links

In Arch Linux:
Everything should be set up for you on Arch so just make sure you have libsvga installed (it may be installed when you install links as a dependency).

pacman -Sy links

To run links in graphical mode:

links -g

or

links2 -g

Have fun!

Slackware-Current Xfce 4.4.2 Updates

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:33 pm on Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Slackware 12 - Current, Firefox, Xfce 4.4.2 Screenshot.I upgraded my Slackware Box to Slackware-Current yesterday and there are many updated packages. Here is the Slackware Current Changelog.

Included is Xfce 4.4.2, this is the newest Xfce and has many bug fixes and a minor security bug fix in terminal. For the entire list you can look at the Xfce – 4.4.2 changelog

Firefox 2.0.0.11 is in this release which is good because sometimes the current repository contains older versions of Firefox.

The screenshot is just a screenshot of the GetFireFox page. Also, you will notice the nice transparencies feature of Xfce. Click it for the larger version.