Linux Blog

Syncing your Delicious Bookmarks

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:24 am on Friday, December 11, 2009

I’ve written about syncing your bookmarks on Linux before.

I’ve been using the method with GMarks and the Google Toolbar plugin for some time and it works just fine. I also have a Delicious account that I use for work, that I like to access and save book marks to from any computer., this is where SimpleDelicious comes into play.

Simple and seamless delicious bookmarks management from your FireFox browser menu. Unlike others it’s aimed to be simple to use and not bloated with invasive and unnecessary features.
features:

-Add and delete delicious tags/bookmarks from the browser menu, as simple as that

And it really it is, it’s a quick install then enter your account information and you’re good to go. I find the sorting on it is a little strange as it organizes by tags rather than folders, but it works. If you remember where you put something or have a good organizing system (unlike my assortment of random tags that seemed like a good idea at the time) you’ll always be able to find what you’re looking for. You can always use the web front end to search and organize your bookmarks if you have to, but this firefox plugin makes syncing and adding to your delicious bookmarks easy!

delicious_thumb

Thunderbird localmail Spool

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:13 pm on Friday, July 3, 2009

Thunderbird

I was in a bit of a bind the other day when I learned that an IMAP server I was using was going to dissapear. I wanted to backup all of my mail, but had too many messages hosted on the IMAP server to copy from one to another, so I decided I’d download them all locally first and then deal with them later. I used fetchmail to download all of my messages from the IMAP main folder to my local spool, and copied over all of the sub folders because I was in a rush and needed to copy them quickly.

Once they were in my local mail spool, I wanted to get them into Thunderbird, but learned that the option I had once used to read my localmail had gone. There used to be an option for it in the GUI, but somewhere along the line it got removed. After a bit of Googling, I found: http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-questions/2003-December/027652.html

This worked for me, and should work for any one that wants to use Thunderbird to read local mail.

Basically, you add a new mail account in Thunderbird as usual, then close it. Get into your local profile directory by using

cd .thunderbird/[tab]
 
then
 
vi prefs.js

find your new mail server, with the bogus name and change the hostname to localhost, change your name to <yourusername>@localhost, the server type to movemail, and change the userName to your username. It should look something like the following:

user_pref("mail.server.server4.hostname", "localhost");
user_pref("mail.server.server4.name", "owen@localhost");
user_pref("mail.server.server4.type", "movemail");
user_pref("mail.server.server4.userName", "owen");

Once thats done, you can restart Thunderbird and fetch your mail as usual. From there you can do as you wish with your messages.

Excellent! My question really is why was the GUI option removed from Thunderbird? Whatever the answer this method still works, so if you need to, use it while you still can!

Introduction to CHMOD – Octal Format

Filed under: General Linux,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:25 pm on Tuesday, September 25, 2007

CHMOD is used to change permissions on a file. There are three types of permissions read, write, execute and there are three types that permissions can be set for owner, group and other.
It can be used with a symbolic representation or with an octal number that represents the bits. This blog post features on just the octal format. CHMOD works on most Linux file systems. It is also used on other operating systems such as BSD. Web designers and developers may be familiar with CHMOD as they have to set permissions when uploading files via FTP.

The octal notation can seem quite confusing but is actually very simple.
To figure out the octal format take the following table:

  Owner Group Other
Read 4 4 4
Write 2 2 2
Execute 1 1 1

To figure out the octal method just add up the sum of what you want to set the permissions to.
If you would like to set the permissions for the owner to read, write execute and the group/other to read and execute you would do the following:

  Owner Group Other
Read 4 4 4
Write 2 2 2
Execute 1 1 1
Add: 7 5 5

Its that simple. The way I remember the numbers to the corresponding permission is to remember that the number starts with 4 and is divided by two and then I repeat the following:
“For Read, Two Write, Execute”
meaning that 4 is read, 2 is write and the last (1) is execute.

There are graphical utilities that set permissions such as Thunar in XFCE and Konqeuror for KDE, but they normally do not allow you to change the permissions on multiple files at once.

If you have a whole directory full of files that you would like to change permissions on, you can simply do:

chmod 755 *

* is a wild card or regex and tells chmod to change permissions on all files.

If you would like chmod to go into directories and change permissions on files, the -R option is used.

chmod 755 -R *

will change permissions on all files and dive into the folders also.

chmod is an absolute must for system administrators and is good to know for home Linux users. If your experimenting with chmod be careful and do not use the -R option unless your absolutly sure you need to. I have accidentally used chmod to recursivly change permissions on a whole drive before. Lets leave it at this was not what I call a fun time since I had changed them to a very open 777.

Take that as your warning.