Linux Blog

Goals For The New Year

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Wednesday, January 6, 2010

As the new year has turned, I thought it would be a good time to go back and look at my goals for 2009. To be honest they were pretty modest and I’d pretty much forgotten what they were, despite this fact I still managed to get 4 out of the 6 done. Getting certified never happened, but I feel like I became more qualified, which is all that matters right? Hah. I blame the CD ripping on streaming media services like Pandora, Grooveshark and last.fm which pretty much eliminated my need to rip the CD’s. So all in all I guess it was a productive year.

I’m still working on my technical related goals for this coming year, I don’t really know what to put on the list yet, since I’ve found that goals will change as time goes on. For example, I set up my PBX in November of 09 which was about 11 months after I set the goal that I had forgotten about. Maybe I’ll roll the two I did not accomplish in 2009 over, add a the goals of getting more organized and reducing the amount of equipment I have. Yea, those seem reasonable for now.

Happy new year!

Things I don’t want to do in 2009.

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:59 am on Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Things I don't want to do in 2009
Since we are now in the second month of 2009 I figured it would be a good time to follow up on My Goals for 2009. I have not made much progress on my goals, but hey any progress is progress right? This post is my list of things that I do not want to repeat in 2009, either from 2008 or before. Only the first item is non-technical and this list is not quite as long as my list of things I want to achieve in 2009. I’m sure I’ll think of more as the year goes on. Again, its not an all-inclusive list and I hopefully won’t have to come and amend this document too quickly, if at all, oh who am I kidding I should probably add to this before I even post it.

We’ll start off what happened to me on new years eve 2008. To say the least I got very drunk, meaning that I was so hung over that I couldn’t function. Therefore I spent the rest of the day in bed, I’ll try not to make a repeat of this in 2009 on any account. New years eve or not, what a way to start the new year.

I’m pretty sure that I did this one in 2008, if not I’ve done it in the past and do not want to repeat it. It involves some personal data and a mistyped command, resulting in data loss. What about backups? Well it doesn’t help if the mistyped command was intended to make a backup of the data rather than destroy it.

Working on production machines. This is a touchy subject, sometimes there are times you HAVE to work with production machines, there is just no way around it. What I aim to do, is not work on them as often. For example, I can copy a portion of a live database to my development machine and work on it from there rather than just copy the database or table on a production machine. This way I will prevent locking up tables with a poorly written query and perhaps avoid a restore from backup or rather large oh $#@! moment.

I don’t want to run a certain distribution for my servers in 2009. I’ll keep the distribution anonymous in this one but those that know me will know one of my dirty little secrets. It’s not them, its me. It involves a bleeding edge distribution that gets updated every six months or so. In short it shouldn’t be used in a production environment. I wasn’t involved in the decision to run this distribution but I will be involved in solving this nightmare.

To end this list I give you the epic chmod 755 -R while in the root directory. I don’t think this one needs any more explanation.

Checking your battery life from the shell

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:46 am on Tuesday, December 11, 2007

I’ve often thought to my self “Wouldn’t knowing how much battery life I had be nice.”

Now when a window manager is open, this isn’t a problem. But when your just in a terminal it can be a bit of a problem. If you don’t get the gist of it heres an example, if I’m just in a terminal writing an article, or programming in VIM on battery life. Now I no longer have to execute the following command and guess how much life I have left:

 cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT1/state

I simply run the command:

yacpi

It tells me all kinds of information about my power usage, what the current temperature is, am I plugged in, what CPU governor I’m using. Its a really neat tool. I would recommend for everyone to install it. Worst case scenario it can be used when the system is undergoing maintenance, or if you left your box sitting in the other room and need to check the battery live via SSH. Check out the screenshot:

YACPI Screenshot

To install it it will vary by distribution. I’m sure Debian has it in its XXXX number of packages which means Ubuntu probably has it too. To install on other distributions such as Gentoo or Slackware you’ll need the source. You can acquire the source from here: http://freshmeat.net/redir/yacpi/55486/url_homepage/yacpi
You’ll also need libacpi which can be found here: http://freshmeat.net/projects/libacpi/?branch_id=70062
Make sure you compile libacpi first, or the make will fail for yacpi.

That’s it, once you download the package and install or download and compile the source you’re good to go. Have a good time checking the battery life from the shell. Try doing that in DOS!