Linux Blog

Things I can do before Windows Boots

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:38 am on Monday, June 28, 2010

I guess I’m one of the lucky ones that gets to use Linux at work. The kicker is, I need Windows to do part of my work so I have two machines. After a recent power outage, I needed to boot both machines this morning. So, I thought I’d document what I did before Windows booted.

  1. Turned both machines on
  2. Cleaned 3 coffee mugs and came back
  3. Talked to my boss about the power outage
  4. Logged into my Linux machine
  5. Started all the software I thought I might need for the day (Pidgin, Thunderbird, Firefox, Eclipse, Tilda and screen)
  6. Checked my e-mail
  7. Approved some comments on this blog
  8. Wrote this blog post.

On that note, my Windows machine is about booted and I can load up the Word documents that were inconveniently sent to me in .docx format. What a Monday Morning.

Halloween Pumpkin

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:15 am on Friday, October 30, 2009

For Halloween this year every department at work was asked to carve or decorate a pumpkin. Since I’m in IT I thought I’d take the task of decorating our pumpkin with something IT related that would scare the crap out of everyone. Most of our end users are actually Windows users, so this pumpkin should be especially scary to them.

I introduce the B.S.O.Dkin, yes it’s a B.S.O.D pumpkin

B.S.O.D Pumpkin.

B.S.O.D Pumpkin.

I’d like to say it looks better in person, but it really doesn’t. I don’t really have an artsy knack for carving or painting pumpkins or I could have done something a lot better.

I guess my “Halloween Costume” is a blue Mexican wrestlers mask, blue t-shirt, and jeans to complete the B.S.O.D theme. With as much hate as I’ve been giving Microsoft recently I’m going to have to keep my fingers crossed for no kernel panics. Karma might bite me.

Throw a rave when you work too hard

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:36 pm on Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Workrave

Workrave is an awesome little utility that I just found out about almost a week ago now. Basically what it does is sits in your tray and bugs you when you should take breaks. Its really simple to use, and is in the Fedora repositories. Since, my Open SUSE laptop is at home and off, I can’t tell you if it is in there but my guess is that Debian / Ubuntu also have this package. Once you’ve got it installed by whatever means possible, run it. Its very easy to use, but I would advise setting up your defaults. If you don’t you’ll be taking a short rest break once every 3 minutes, which I find to be a bit excessive. You also get rest breaks, which advise you to stand up and walk around, and do stretches. It has some great statistics such as how many keystrokes you make, how many breaks you’ve taken. It also accounts for “natural” rest breaks, so if there is no activity on your computer, it thinks you are idle. Although I have not tried it there is network support for Workrave. Perhaps one day I will try it. If you spend a long time in front of the computer at home or work (like I’m doing today) then this may be the application for you, especially if you are trying to avoid doing work. getting fatigued. Talking of work, I had better get back to what I was doing; oh yea, taking a break.

Back Again

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:30 am on Tuesday, October 28, 2008

I had to leave town last Tuesday for a family funeral, and therefore did not make any updates to my blog. While I had a long drive that I could have wrote some posts, its sometimes nice to just take a break. I didn’t even update or check my Twitter account.

In the upcoming days I’ll have some more blog posts written. Its almost Halloween again, and I guess its been almost a year (maybe two) since I introduced Aaron but he never made a post. Perhaps I’ll convince him to write one since I’ve been helping him out with his blog BackwoodsHorror.com (and I just linked to him.) I do however have some guest posts from some one called Dave from the good old Internet’s that I’ll be posting for your reading pleasure. If you’d like to write for TheLinuxBlog, just send them to me by e-mail (owen–A T–thelinuxblog.com) or send me a message and I’ll create you a user account.

As always I appreciate user feedback and more content to publish would be awesome! Thanks for all of your contributions,

- Owen.

Man Page Not Found

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:58 pm on Sunday, March 16, 2008

I’ve added this post because the Linux Man Pages that I have added to this site need to be directed some where when a man page is not found. I stumbled upon the problem after I saw Google trying to index pages that did not exist. My guess is that there are links within the man pages section that are bad.

I will be monitoring this page to see where the hits to this page are coming from but if you followed a link here from the Linux man pages section then I would really appreciate a comment with which page you ended up here from and I will fix the problem.

Thanks in advance,

-Owen.

Ideas For Open Source Product Names

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:12 am on Tuesday, March 11, 2008

I’m trying to think of a name for a product that I am developing. One thing about the open source community is that we have a goldmine of minds waiting to be used. One thing that amazes me is the number of quality brand names that have been established. Establishing a brand can be quite difficult and product names are just as important.

My Question is,

“Where Open Source Application names come from?

I understand the basic ones, such as Open, or put a K, g in front of a word for your application but what about the more complex names. Audacious, WireShark (Formerly Ethereal) and Asterisk are all great names for products and are related to what the product does. I guess I’ll have to keep thinking about this product until I can come up with a decent name.

Checking your battery life from the shell

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:46 am on Tuesday, December 11, 2007

I’ve often thought to my self “Wouldn’t knowing how much battery life I had be nice.”

Now when a window manager is open, this isn’t a problem. But when your just in a terminal it can be a bit of a problem. If you don’t get the gist of it heres an example, if I’m just in a terminal writing an article, or programming in VIM on battery life. Now I no longer have to execute the following command and guess how much life I have left:

cat /proc/acpi/battery/BAT1/state

I simply run the command:

yacpi

It tells me all kinds of information about my power usage, what the current temperature is, am I plugged in, what CPU governor I’m using. Its a really neat tool. I would recommend for everyone to install it. Worst case scenario it can be used when the system is undergoing maintenance, or if you left your box sitting in the other room and need to check the battery live via SSH. Check out the screenshot:

YACPI Screenshot

To install it it will vary by distribution. I’m sure Debian has it in its XXXX number of packages which means Ubuntu probably has it too. To install on other distributions such as Gentoo or Slackware you’ll need the source. You can acquire the source from here: http://freshmeat.net/redir/yacpi/55486/url_homepage/yacpi
You’ll also need libacpi which can be found here: http://freshmeat.net/projects/libacpi/?branch_id=70062
Make sure you compile libacpi first, or the make will fail for yacpi.

Thats it, once you download the package and install or download and compile the source you’re good to go. Have a good time checking the battery life from the shell. Try doing that in DOS!