Linux Blog

Connect to Wireless using NetworkManager

Filed under: Linux Video Tutorials,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 am on Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Here’s an old video I made that demonstrates how to connect to a wireless network using NetworkManager.
(Read on …)

Check if SELinux is Enabled

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:41 am on Monday, December 8, 2008

This weeks (now late) Shell Script Sundays (posted on Monday) article is a short one on a check to see if SELinux is enabled. While SELinux has some great security enhancements it can present a number of problems in applications and shell scripts alike. There is a simple utility that comes with many Linux distributions called “selinuxenabled”

selinuxenabled exits with a status of 1 if it is not enabled and 0 if it is. Zero normally means false but in this case since it is an exit status it is an exception. So, if you need to do a quick check, you may just run selinuxenabled. You will quickly find that it returns nothing. To figure out the exit status for your quick check, put an ampersand (&) at the end, and it will tell you the exit status. eg:

[root@thelinuxblog.com ~]# selinuxenabled &
[1] 28417
[1]+  Exit 1                  selinuxenabled

As we can see from the example above SELinux is disabled.

To use selinuxenabled in your scripts you would use it like any other command. Refer to Shell Scripting 101 for some more information. selinuxenabled can also be used in your scripts to make sure that selinux is enabled, which can be useful if you are trying to do security audits across multiple machines.

The New Gentoo

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:23 am on Tuesday, July 8, 2008

I don’t keep up with releases of new Linux distributions really. If I did then I probably wouldn’t have time to write on this blog, but I noticed that Gentoo was released on Sunday the 6th of July (http://www.gentoo.org/news/20080706-release-2008.0.xml) I’ve never been a big Gentoo guy, I’ve dabbled with it but it never really caught my attention. I think it may be time for me to revisit Gentoo, at least in a virtual environment to check it out again. I do have a need for a small footprint, easy to maintain and expandable operating system. I have been using Slackware for simplicity and small footprint, but it is not the easiest to maintain or expand. Gentoo on the over hand can be configured well, updates easily and is pretty expandable through portage and emerge. The only thing that concerns me is the compile time, often the reason I want a minimal installation is for a project that has to run on less than adequate hardware. Using Gentoo rather than another distribution could be a problem since it seems like it takes for ever to install by copying and extracting files, let alone compile them.

Anyhow, have fun with the new Gentoo!

New versions of popular Linux distributions

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:34 pm on Wednesday, May 14, 2008

Its not often that I cover big news in the Linux community but I think these two Linux distributions are noteworthy.

Firstly Fedora 9 has been released. I was lucky enough to get the DVD ISO but have not yet had a chance to install it. I am however going to get to update a number of Fedora 8 boxes to Fedora 9 when I have deemed Fedora 9 stable for production. The feature list looks nice and hopefully the upgrades will go smoothly. It has been a while since I have looked at Fedora and I have to say I am very impressed with 8. It found most of my hardware (sound excused) and even has modern features that have come to lack in my next topic.

Slackware 12.1 was also released this month. This update to Slackware came quicker than previous versions and has a nice list of features that make me want to upgrade my slack box. As pat mentions better RAID, LVM support are among the list. Hal has been added so the properly configuring Slackware 12.1 should make Slackware a little more user friendly and stream the mounting of devices. I will confirm if the Slackware HAL fix is still applicable but from reading the Slackware release announcement it seems like it still needs to be done. I’ll document this pretty soon so stay tuned!

What to do when you run out of disk space

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 am on Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Some times you run out of disk space. It just happens. So, what do you do when it does happen?

Well, it just happened to me and I’ll write about what I did. I’ll first start off with how I discovered that I was out of disk space in the first place. It was about 10:30 last night when for some reason that I can’t remember now I decided I’d start up my good old XP Virtual Machine (Probably to use some quirky Windows program.) Anyhow the VMWare console reported that I did not have enough disk space. This came as a bit of a shock to me as I have a 100GB hard drive. I had been downloading ISO’s of Linux Distributions but not that much. So, here is what to do when you run out of disk space:

Step 1) Don’t panic
Step 2) Take a look at your processes and shutdown anything that is not needed. init to single user mode if it makes you feel better.
Step 3) Use the disk free utility to figure out how much space you have:

df -h /

Step 4) Make a couple of megabytes of free space so that you can install a program.
Step 5) Download and install xdiskusage from source or from your favorite package manager.
Step 6) Run xdiskusage from the terminal as root
Step 7) Select a disk / partition
Step 8) Wait
Step 9) View the results
Step 10) Rinse wash repeat. (Browse Partitions / Delete / Move files to another disk & do it again)

Here are some screen shots of my xdiskusage:

xdiskusage example screenshot
xdiskusage example screenshot xdiskusage example screenshot xdiskusage example screenshot
Click For xdiskusage screenshots

As you can see from the root screen shot that my root partition that I have 60GB used between my /var and /home directories. On closer inspection, the var has 40GB, 20GB in virtual machines and 20GB in the logs directory. 20GB’s of logs is quite a lot, this is where my problem is. After finding the problem I was able to backup my log files and remove them. I know that this can be done with shell scripts xdiskusage has helped me in the past so I thought I’d pass on the information. If you have a favorite utility or script what you use when you run out of disk space let me know!

Project URL: http://xdiskusage.sourceforge.net/

Linux Related Ads

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:31 pm on Monday, December 17, 2007

I’ve added some advertising to this blog to help offset the cost of running the server, I hope you guys don’t mind too much.

Every so often I see a banner ad for a product I once stumbled across on the net once. The product is Bomgar and they basically specialize in remote support appliances. I was interested in this product because they actually support major Linux distributions – now that is neat!

Basically in a nutshell your client goes to your website and clicks a button it installs temporary software on their computer and you get to support it, there are a ton more features that are in nifty flash animations on their site. Did I mention that it runs on major Linux distributions? That is a great feature in my opinion, they have support for SUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora and Red Hat. Impressive. If you currently support a Linux network this could be a great little box. Its a little pricey but in my opinion the cost may be worth it for the ability to easily support Linux boxes. I’d like to support a company that sees the need for enterprise Linux solutions.

I would like to see an open source solution that is similar to this but doesn’t have the price tag. If you know of one, let me know!

My Linux Desktop Machine

Filed under: Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:39 am on Saturday, November 24, 2007

Maybe its just me but I find it interesting to look at other peoples computer stuff so I’m going to take the time to write some blog posts about my hardware.

First in my lineup is my Desktop. This is by no means a new computer but runs very well.
CPU: AMD Athlon XP 2500+
Motherboard: MSI KT400
Memory: 512MB DDR 333
Hard Drive: 160GB Maxtor
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce FX5200
Ethernet: ADMtek NC100 Network Everywhere 10/100
Media Devices: CD-RW, Floppy, ATA133 Hard Drive Bay
Monitor: LG 19″ Flat Panel. DVI, VGA, 1280×1024. 4ms 1400:1
Keyboard/Mouse: Generic Staples $10 special and a unknown brand painted laser mouse.

Every device is supported by the 2.6 kernel and Linux runs very well on it. The motherboard uses a VIA chip set and a C-Media audio device. The CPU is
actually 1875.733 MHz with a 512KB cache. According to cat /proc/cpuinfo it has a bogomips rating of 3754.8

Now comes the sensitive part, my distro of choice. For some this is a sour topic but I’ll just say that it doesn’t really matter to me. I run windows on it before and most Linux distributions out perform it out of the box (after installing video drivers.) I choose to run Slackware 12 on it because of the simplicity. It took a little while to configure it how I like but it turned out pretty well. I use slackpkg to keep it current.

I’ll be sure to post some pictures of the setup some time.

Thats about all I have to say about my desktop, if you have any questions or would like any additional information just give me an e-mail at: owen @ thelinuxblog.com