Linux Blog

Linux For Everyone!

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:12 am on Friday, January 30, 2009

Today, while I was in the shower I was thinking:

“What way do people closely interact with Linux everyday without even knowing it”


With the recent re-regurgitation of the old GNU vs. Cisco case it came to mind that many people use Linux on a daily basis by using their routers. While this is not the best example of Linux in its prime it is a good way to demonstrate the versatility of the Linux operating system. To some, the concept of an operating system running on anything other than the latest and greatest hardware is alien. To Linux users this is part of its beauty.

I personally have two Linux powered routers. The first is a cheapo Belkin that is not very well suited, the second is the better supported WRT54G.

There are many variants of the WRT’s My personal favorite is DD-WRT because this is what I’ve used for a while, and I’m most familiar with it. I have an office with quite a lot of equipment that is somewhat distant from my cable modem and access point. What I use the first router for is a static access point, next to the cable modem, the second router has been re-purposed to be a full time bridge. I encrypted the communications and set up some static IP’s. I have a hundred or so DHCP lease IP’s available for friends and virtual machines. Whats great about this setup is DD-WRT does a great job as a bridge and hardly ever drops. My cable connection has gone out far more times then the bridge, if it ever has at all. I am able to connect many machines to the Internet over wireless while keeping my office communications switched. I do not have any of the hassles of multiple wireless cards with touchy Windows and Linux drivers and random dropped connections. The wireless bridge is so reliable I am able to do VOIP over it, with QoS to ensure that my calls always have priority over streaming media and other network traffic. DD-WRT truly has been the best thing that I’ve ever done to my routers and is really a great replacement for the Linksys junkware.

With this in mind next time your dearest Windows zealot complains about the stability of their Small/Home Office router, perhaps taking a stab at the stability of Linux (if their router even runs it) how about you educate them on the versatility of Linux. If you like, you could walk them through the very easy steps of installing a WRT variant onto the router (if possible) and enable Linux’s full potential to shine through.

Linux Performance Boosting – Graphics

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:24 pm on Thursday, July 31, 2008

Is your Linux box chugging along? Does it take a while for web pages to load or to boot up? Does your screen lag when you scroll a web page?

Well my friends, you’ve come to the right place. The issue with your Linux box performing poorly could be a graphics issue. A lot of distributions do not install the correct graphics drivers by default. Yes, your graphical user interface might work, but without the correct Linux graphic drivers you will not get the performance that you should be getting.

Linux has a default video driver called VESA, most video cards work with this driver but perform poorly. The reason behind this is VESA uses the CPU to do graphics processing and does not rely on the video card for 3D acceleration. If you have a 3D accelerated video card (most ATI / NVIDIA’s I will not go into detail here) then you might be able to offload graphics processing from your CPU onto your GPU.

Here is how to test to see if your frames per second if you are using the VESA standard driver:

 

[owen@LinuxBlog ~]$ glxgears
2623 frames in 5.0 seconds = 524.096 FPS
1677 frames in 5.0 seconds = 334.784 FPS
1948 frames in 5.0 seconds = 389.488 FPS
XIO:  fatal IO error 11 (Resource temporarily unavailable) on X server ":0.0"
after 19707 requests (19415 known processed) with 0 events remaining.

Now, the performance of this machine is quite good so the resulting frames per second (FPS) is not too shabby, but its not the best either. After installing the correct Linux video card driver for this Linux box lets take a look at what kind of performance I get:

[owen@LinuxBlog ~]$ glxgears
6179 frames in 5.0 seconds = 1235.749 FPS
6558 frames in 5.0 seconds = 1311.449 FPS
6489 frames in 5.0 seconds = 1295.583 FPS
XIO:  fatal IO error 22 (Invalid argument) on X server ":0.0"
after 39 requests (39 known processed) with 0 events remaining.

As you can see from the results the graphics driver make a huge difference in the number of FPS I can achieve, but this is not the only benefit from using the correct 3D accelerated driver. When the correct driver is installed, the graphics card does most of the work therefore freeing up the CPU do other tasks. Its a win-win situation, so get your graphics card set up properly today!