Linux Blog

Hey, The Linux Blog has Moved Servers!

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:03 am on Monday, April 13, 2009

Host GatorJust a quick update to let everyone know that The Linux Blog has moved servers. The hosting company I moved to is Hostgator. I was skeptical to move, since I was hosting it off of a shared dedicated server set up with cpanel/WHM reseller accounts, but I think that this will be better in the long run. For example: the price is right, it is faster and I do not have to worry so much about the system administration and hardware upgrades / failures. I get just about as much bandwidth with all the features I got before and a few extra that I couldn’t afford thrown in. All for about the cost of licensing cpanel and whm on their own. The only down side is the little amount of disk space, but if you decide not to be a reseller, you will be fine since they do an unlimited account (just check the fine print as I did on this one.) The really nice thing about the move is the hardware it runs off of (this is from cpanel and verified via ssh)

Processor #1 Vendor: GenuineIntelProcessor #1 Name: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU           E5405  @ 2.00GHz

Processor #1 speed: 1994.900 MHz

Processor #1 cache size: 6144 KB

So, Dual Xeon Quad cores that you see above, which equates to quite an amount of CPU power, roughly 16GHz with all cores combined. It has I believe 8GB’s of ram and a ton of disk space which happens to be provided by scsi disks. Hostgator have servers in each of ThePlanet.com’s data centers, I could go on about them all day but if I were you I’d check their website, its all under the “Company” link at the bottom of the page. You might see some banners up around here from now on and you’re probably smart enough to figure out the rest.

If you’re reading this that means you’re reading it off of the new server. Hopefully all went well and it loaded a little quicker. I’m hoping that there wasn’t any disruption of services, there wasn’t for me except for e-mail services but I think that has something to do with the DNS on the server I was sending the mail from (the old one.) Anyhow I hope you enjoy and if you’re in the market for a new web host use my Hostgator links!

Why The Antivirus?

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:39 am on Friday, January 23, 2009

Why The Antivirus

Although viri on Linux are not very common, it is not unusual to find anti virus utilities available. You may ask what the point is if your operating system is not as vulnerable to these types of threats but perhaps you are looking at it the wrong way. What better platform is there to act as an anti-virus scanner then one that isn’t as likely to get owned?

Take this example: a Linux file server Vs. a Windows 2003 file server. Just by plugging the Windows server in it may be at risk, in an hostile environment (eg Internet), while the Linux server may not have as much risk (at least from a Virus attack)

We all know the benefits of running Linux file servers such as cost, stability and coolness so we won’t touch on those but there are downsides to running a Linux file server. One of the major downsides is that Linux servers have a perception of being hard to manage. While they can be significantly different from managing a Windows server this myth is often on the top of the list for decision makers.

Often system administrators (myself included in this one) get lazy in their samba configurations. This is a potential problem because a sneaky virus could attempt to write its self to any writable volume, which could cause a lot of grief for the poor Windows machines. Or perhaps in tandem with the writable volume an exploit for a piece of out dated software allowing the writable file to be executed.
A friend of mine first introduced me to the concept of anti-virus scanners on a machine he had created specifically for the purpose of housing his virus collection. He had made a script that extracted information about the virus and cataloged it for easy reading and searching. All he had to do to add a virus to his collection was copy it to a folder. With this method he was able to quickly search and find any virus he had on file for specific traits or purposes for analysis. While some may call this overkill for him it was a hobby. Would you keep your entire virus collection on a Windows machine?

As with any operating system, it is only as secure as you make it, therefore running an anti virus on your Linux machine may not be as stupid as it first sounds. Especially if they interact with the dirty Windows boxes on a regular basis. Then again, if you’re purely a Linux shop, enjoy the cleanliness while it lasts.