Linux Blog

Simplify Media: How’d they do that?

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:39 am on Tuesday, August 19, 2008

By now every bodies probably heard about the SimplifyMedia.com service which just released an application for the iPhone / iTouch that basically lets you stream your, or your friends music though your phone. Its integrated with iTunes, Winamp and RhythmBox on Linux which is pretty cool. I think this is a neat idea and started thinking: “How’d they do that?”

It seems like it would be pretty difficult to achieve something like this, but in fact the concept is quite simple.

iTunes has a DAAP server built in for multimedia streaming media. What Simplify Media does is connect the stream to their server and then when another client (iPhone app / friend) logs in, if the Simplify Media application is running (on your PC) it lets you know and lets you start streaming it.

I have not analyzed to find out the EXACT method of how it works quite yet but I assume that it either uses Simplify Media’s bandwidth to stream (over https) or creates a reverse connection some how. If any one knows the details I’d be interested to know.

My other thoughts / questions on this are:

Will there be a free DAAP client available for the iPhone / iTouch?
Wouldn’t it be cool if you could record the streams?
How long before Apple pulls this application?
Will AT&T or Simplify Media kick you off, throttle, or even worse charge you for using this service?
If they are using Simplify Media’s bandwidth how are they making money?
How long will it be or will there ever be an open implementation of this?

I can’t really answer any of these questions so, if any one wants to take a stab at answering them go for it!

What to do when you run out of disk space

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 am on Tuesday, January 8, 2008

Some times you run out of disk space. It just happens. So, what do you do when it does happen?

Well, it just happened to me and I’ll write about what I did. I’ll first start off with how I discovered that I was out of disk space in the first place. It was about 10:30 last night when for some reason that I can’t remember now I decided I’d start up my good old XP Virtual Machine (Probably to use some quirky Windows program.) Anyhow the VMWare console reported that I did not have enough disk space. This came as a bit of a shock to me as I have a 100GB hard drive. I had been downloading ISO’s of Linux Distributions but not that much. So, here is what to do when you run out of disk space:

Step 1) Don’t panic
Step 2) Take a look at your processes and shutdown anything that is not needed. init to single user mode if it makes you feel better.
Step 3) Use the disk free utility to figure out how much space you have:

df -h /

Step 4) Make a couple of megabytes of free space so that you can install a program.
Step 5) Download and install xdiskusage from source or from your favorite package manager.
Step 6) Run xdiskusage from the terminal as root
Step 7) Select a disk / partition
Step 8) Wait
Step 9) View the results
Step 10) Rinse wash repeat. (Browse Partitions / Delete / Move files to another disk & do it again)

Here are some screen shots of my xdiskusage:

xdiskusage example screenshot
xdiskusage example screenshot xdiskusage example screenshot xdiskusage example screenshot
Click For xdiskusage screenshots

As you can see from the root screen shot that my root partition that I have 60GB used between my /var and /home directories. On closer inspection, the var has 40GB, 20GB in virtual machines and 20GB in the logs directory. 20GB’s of logs is quite a lot, this is where my problem is. After finding the problem I was able to backup my log files and remove them. I know that this can be done with shell scripts xdiskusage has helped me in the past so I thought I’d pass on the information. If you have a favorite utility or script what you use when you run out of disk space let me know!

Project URL: http://xdiskusage.sourceforge.net/

Giving Telnet Access To Root

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:06 am on Thursday, October 11, 2007

After reading Gary Conn’s blog post The Top Ten Google Keyword Blunders. I naturally started searching thru The Linux Blog’s logs in attempt to find something interesting and irrelevant to my blogs main topic: Linux. Unfortunately I did not have that many terms that were funny like Gary’s but I do have one that could be funny to your average Linux user.

Behold the question:

“how to give root to access telnet in linux”

Something tells me that whoever made this search was probably your average Joe Windows Administrator, So in response I am writing a letter to whom ever made that search.

Dear Searcher,
 
While it is possible to give root telnet access under Linux I would strongly advise against it. To give root access you may want to consider using SSH. SSH is an encrypted session where as Telnet is transmitted in clear text; this is not acceptable and should be avoided. Even tho I recommend using SSH I would not recommend that you allow root to log in via SSH for security purposes. To aqquire root priviledges simply log in as a regular user and switch user to root as follows:
 
<a href="mailto:owen@the-linux-blog:~$">owen@the-linux-blog:~$</a> su
- or -
<a href="mailto:owen@the-linux-blog:~$">owen@the-linux-blog:~$</a> sudo su
 
The same commands would also work with telnet but still your root password would be transmitted in plain text. If you need any help setting this up, or further explanation please don’t hesitate to contact me.
Sincerely,
 
Owen.

Now, I understand that sometimes there are legitimate reasons to use telnet (such as for legacy purposes) but we all know that using telnet for remote administration is a BAD idea. If they or anyone else really need to know how to use telnet for a legitimate reason I will post how to do it, but until then it’s best kept a secret.