Linux Blog

Fedora Classroom – Go Learn something!

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:46 am on Tuesday, July 21, 2009

Want to learn about Linux for free? Well, Fedora has a thing called the Fedora classroom which holds classes that teach a group about related technologies. As a casual Fedora user, I find the classes useful but I’m a little bummed that I’ve missed a couple of lessons that I’ve wanted to take in the past.

However tonight, at 9:00 EST (1:00 UTC) Kevin Fenzi is going to be hosting a class on PreUpgrade which is a pretty neat project. I might try to jump on if I get the time, if not it will be reading the chat logs and documentation for me.

For more information on any upcoming classes, or archives of old classes visit https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Classroom and be sure to bookmark it for future reference.

I’d love to see video or slides along with the classes. Has anyone taken any of these classes or have any thoughts on them?

Super Tux Cart FTW

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:52 am on Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Super Tux Cart It has been a while since I’ve even thought about posting about a game and come to think of it, I don’t think I ever have. If I have not, then this would be a great first game to add here, and if I have we can forget about it because Super Tux Cart is so much more fun.

Super Tux Cart as you can imagine is a game similar to that of a particular game that is available for most of the Nintendo systems. Basically you ride around in a go cart racing either another computer, or up to three other players.

The Super Tux Cart team have added a bunch of features, maps and bug fixes since I last looked at it. A networked version is in the works so when thats done, if any one wants to have a tournament let me know. I’d love to race.

Adjust sudo timeout

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:05 pm on Thursday, March 5, 2009

SudoI think its pretty evident that I love sudo right? Well, what I do not like about sudo is the timeout. I understand while its there but five minutes is not exactly what I’d call an overly generous time, especially when I’m parked here at my desk for hours upon end. This tutorial shows you the line you’ll need adjust the sudo timeout:

First as root you’ll want to get into the sudo file and edit it. I’m sure you know how to do this since you’ve probably already visudo’ed your way into using sudo and are now trying to adjust the timeout. For those just reading for the sake of it, you’ll do the command: visudo

Right, now you’re there, you’ll either be in nano, pico or vi depending on your distribution. Search for the Defaults section, and put

Defaults:[your username] timestamp_timeout=[your timeout]

Replace your username with yours. Change your timeout to the number of minutes, or -1 for unlimited per session. Save and quit, then exit. Try it again, then try it again after the sudo timeout you set has changed. If it works, great news if not double check your sudoers file for another Default property that may be acting up.

The Linux Blog – More May Updates

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:30 am on Monday, May 26, 2008

If you read my last Linux Blog update post you will have noticed that I added links to the man pages that have examples of how to use that command. This blog post is to tell you that I have implemented that feature but the reverse. In other words, when ever you view a Linux Blog post that I have written you will see links to the man pages of the commands used in that post and from there you can navigate to other examples of how to use that command. I hope that this feature is a useful one for The Linux Blog readers, if it is let me know and if it isn’t tell me you like it any way. I’m going to be adding more man pages soon since I have found that not all man pages that I have are on The Linux Blog. I will also be adding more man page sections for the ones I missed out.

Now that I have implemented that function the only thing I really have to do is have the ability to add, update and manage man pages on the fly.

More news
I have also been corresponding with the guys over at Wakoopa about working on a client to their web application for Linux. I will let you know more information as it becomes available. I am very interested in writing a client for their service and would love for Linux users to be able to join in on the fun!

Thats all for now,

– Owen

Why I Love Open Source Software

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:32 pm on Thursday, April 10, 2008

Have you been looking for a piece of software that does exactly what you want it to? Perhaps its a tool for a client, or an application that would just make your life easier. On a daily basis I always am thinking of new things that I would like my favorite applications to do.

I am going to be writing within the next couple of days about my favorite CHM tools. One of the useful ones I use is a great little tool and it gets the job done, but it doesn’t do EXACTLY what I want. This is why I love open source. I can simple grab the source and change it if I need to. That is the freedom you are given.

Well, I’m not exactly the best C coder in the world but, given time if the application is that critical to me I can make the changes. I can get help from communities when needed and read free information on the web all day long to help me get the job done. If I can’t figure out how to do it in the language the application was written in its not a problem, I can analyze the source code and possibly find a work around. One powerful work around for the CHM application is the Shell.

This is one of the reasons I love open source software. There are many others, feel free to chip in and say why you love open source!

General Linux Change Password

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:52 am on Thursday, December 20, 2007

Changing your password under Linux is a pretty simple task providing you know how to do it, and of course since we’re talking about Linux: changing your password is as simple or complicated as you want it to be either way. You either love GUI’s or you hate them, so one method or the other can be confusing. I’m more of a console guy, but I’ll start with the GUI methods because thats probably what I think the masses want to see first. Remember what your doing tho, if you need to change the password on more than one box, I would look into changing your password by command line.

There is more than one reason to change your password, the examples below assume that you are just changing the current users password because it needs to be changed.

kdepasswd

kdepasswd example

passwd

linux change passwd

If you need to change the password for another user, log in as root and execute the following:

passwd (username)

linux change passwd

There are many ways to change your root password if you forgot it.

One way to do it is to boot up with a live CD, mount your hard drive, chroot and then execute the passwd command, once you reboot your password should be reset.

Comment spam vent and an idea to combat it

Filed under: General Linux,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:48 am on Thursday, September 27, 2007

Ok I just have to vent a little. Spam Spam Spam. Spam bots and blog spammers in general are stupid. Why would you spam a site that doesn’t even have comments on blog posts? I don’t get it. I would love to get my hands on the code of these spam bots to see how they are working. It would be so simple for them to actually load the page and grep for the comment link. That way they could stop wasting mine and their time by spamming this site. All comments are marked as spam at the moment since that’s all I’m getting. If some one wants to send me a comment they could go trough the trouble of creating a <FORM> to send one but I think they would just send me mail at owen -at- <thelinuxblog.com>. This generally means that I can delete all of the comments I get as I doubt any one is really going to create a form just to send me a comment.

IP addresses are being recorded and I’ll continue to monitor the situation. Eventually I might do a security scan on repeat offenders and let the ISP of the host know what’s what. It would be nice to catch the spammer but I will settle for the knowing that the owners of the Zombie PC have been warned about the consequences and might send their computer in for repair.

After writing this post I have an idea for a Linux Blog project. The Linux Blog can be the first to submit data. Basically I propose a plugin for WordPress that would monitor comments and send the IP’s of those that were spam (either flagged manually or automatically) to a host. This host would log all of the IP’s submitted and when appropriate take action against them.
This reminds me of a project that I saw a presentation on at CarolinaCon 05. Except this project was targeted at bot nets and aimed to be malicious back or ban the host / subnet completely. This would not be necessary for this project; just a simple mail merge application written in Linux would work.
I suppose the real first step is to see if this application already exists. I’m sure I’m not the first person to think of this.
I guess I need to come up with a quirky name for the project and a plan. It goes without saying that the platform will be Linux and will use open source applications to achieve the final goal. Once research has been done I can either try to add it to my never ending list of projects to complete or find a team of developers willing to work on it.