Linux Blog

Halloween Pumpkin

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:15 am on Friday, October 30, 2009

For Halloween this year every department at work was asked to carve or decorate a pumpkin. Since I’m in IT I thought I’d take the task of decorating our pumpkin with something IT related that would scare the crap out of everyone. Most of our end users are actually Windows users, so this pumpkin should be especially scary to them.

I introduce the B.S.O.Dkin, yes it’s a B.S.O.D pumpkin

B.S.O.D Pumpkin.

B.S.O.D Pumpkin.

I’d like to say it looks better in person, but it really doesn’t. I don’t really have an artsy knack for carving or painting pumpkins or I could have done something a lot better.

I guess my “Halloween Costume” is a blue Mexican wrestlers mask, blue t-shirt, and jeans to complete the B.S.O.D theme. With as much hate as I’ve been giving Microsoft recently I’m going to have to keep my fingers crossed for no kernel panics. Karma might bite me.

Microsoft Jokes!

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:07 pm on Tuesday, August 25, 2009

I’m not normally one to just flat out bash Microsoft or trash them for their flaws, but sometimes I do enjoy a good Microsoft Joke.

Here are I know off the top of my head:

Q: How many Microsoft Engineers does it take to change a lightbulb?
A: None its obviously a hardware problem

A helicopter was flying around above Seattle when an electrical malfunction disabled all of the aircraft’s electronic
navigation and communications equipment.


Due to the clouds and haze, the pilot could not determine the helicopter’s position. The pilot saw a tall building,
flew toward it, circled, and held up a handwritten sign that said “WHERE AM I?” in large letters.

People in the tall building quickly responded to the aircraft, drew a large sign, and held it in a building window.
Their sign said “YOU ARE IN A HELICOPTER.”

The pilot smiled, waved, looked at his map, determined the course to steer to SEATAC airport, and landed safely. After
they were on the ground, the copilot asked the pilot how he had done it.

“I knew it had to be the Microsoft Building, because they gave me a technically correct but completely useless answer!”

They’re terrible I know… Terribly *FUNNY*. Post your favorite Microsoft Jokes in the comments or tweet them to @LinuxBlog and I’ll include them here.

Microsoft Advertising Strategy

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 pm on Tuesday, October 14, 2008

All right, so just because this is a Linux Blog does that mean I’m only allowed to blog about Linux technologies? Well, its my blog and since I’m here I might as well go ahead and write about what is on my mind.

Over the past year I’ve noticed a lot of advertisements that have the “nerdy” appeal to them. Namely the Mac Vs. Pc ones, and any others that you might see whist watching say the Office.

Well, it seems that Microsoft is trying to promote Server 2008 in this way. Creating “hip” advertisements that make people laugh. Whilst I thought the advertisement I saw on some IT blog was funny, after watching it a couple of times (downloading it, uploading to YouTube and posting it here) I’m starting to find it rather annoying.

So here is the video

What do you think of this video? I snickered at first, and then watched the other videos… (I had to bust out Windows, blow the dust off of it, endure the bootup and then install silverlight to see all of them) and I can’t say that it was time well spent. None of these adverts give me any information as to why I should use Windows virtualization other than the point of “We have a big marketing budget, buy our stuff” Well, if they are just trying to get the word out, I guess it worked, after all I am blogging about it :) If they’re trying to get people to think about it, then I guess it worked. This sort of reminds me of the older VOIP YOUR WAY ads, which I enjoyed a lot better. Again, they must have a huge budget for this as they have re-done the VOIP site (it used to be silverlight only, its now flash)

Well, I suppose I’m starting to rant now, so I’ll let you all go about your business. I’m posting this in the Linux Blog News category for lack of a better place. Perhaps I’ll create an area for non Linux related posts one day.

Linux Certifications

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:27 am on Saturday, July 12, 2008

I made a tweet yesterday about how once every so often I get obsessed with certifications. Even though I normally get around to studying let alone sitting the test. I was wondering if this is a problem for any one else. Certifications to me are so tempting, but finding the time to actually do it is another thing. If there is an multiple choice exam for a certification given time any one can take the test, so why isn’t every one qualified?

I can’t speak for every one but I know why I don’t hold as many certifications as I would like.

1) Money
Firstly money comes into play. Even if you self study, buy books or from reading free certification guides and objectives online you still have to pay for the exam. This is a big factor when coming to get certified. Even if sponsorship from an employer or other organization is available this can still be a problem.

2) Time
I for one do not like to fail exams, therefore I like to study to make sure I’ll pass. Making the time needed to study for an exam is often a challenge. Things come up which distract me from studying, or scheduling an exam.

3) Return
This is one of the major reasons for obtaining a certification. Whats in it for me? After all why am I going to get a certification if it is no benefit to me. The return on some certifications is not measurable. Its hard to look into the future and say,
“Wow, it was a good job I got Linux+ certified”
When or if the time comes for a job change certification’s are a great tool, even if they are not well respected in the industry. For example take MCSA and LPIC, if a systems administrator holds just one of these certifications and is applying for a position that requires Linux and Microsoft experience, their chances of getting assessed for the position by human resources would be less than the chances of one who has both. I also think that the return is a major reason I don’t hold more certifications. If everyone knew that taking an exam would be of great benefit who wouldn’t study and sit an exam?

Some people say that most certifications are a waste of time, but I don’t think that they are if all of the above factors are reasonable. Any one else have thoughts?

Microsoft Office 2007 Suite, Under Wine.

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:07 am on Monday, December 10, 2007

I was browsing around and found this blog post on Using Microsoft Office on Linux with Wine. I’ll have to give it a try some time to see if it runs properly, if it does I don’ t want to hear any of the
“I need Microsoft Office” excuses.

There are plenty of alternatives, Open Office, KOffice, VMWare, Wine/CXOffice. The only real reason I’d want to use Office 2007 on Linux would be for opening the documents that people send me in the 2007 format and the new features of Excel. For every day computing I actually use Open Office myself. Check out the screenshots from the link, it looks pretty smooth (Unlike Photoshop under Wine).

Living Without Windows

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:58 pm on Monday, January 8, 2007

Some may have heard the quote:
“In a world without fences, who needs Windows and Gates?” Although this phrase is clever and slightly funny in reality people do need to use and rely on Windows to do their business on a daily basis.

Like it or not, Windows is here to stay. Given how frustrating it may be, it is not going away any time soon. I have heard so many people complaining about how much they dislike Windows and explain how it is a badly coded unstable operating system but they still choose to run it.
If it were such a bad operating system why do so many people use it? And why is Microsoft still in business? The answer is clear – There is no better alternative for every situation. Some people make claims that Linux is better. Is it? Do these people use it on a daily basis and know that it is in fact a better operating system? It may be a better operating system for one purpose but it is not better in every situation. An example of this could be in the medical field. Imagine the staff are very familiar with Windows and know how to operate it to complete their job. Now imagine your life depended on the staff being able to do their job. Is Linux still a better choice for the given situation?

Linux may be a little harder to set up and use but once a user is familiar with Linux it rewards them with the flexibility they need to get the job done. Tasks that are possible with Linux are not always as simple to accomplish with Windows without pricey third party software.

So how can I live without Windows?

There are two excuses people often use when not running Linux. One is hardware support and the other is software. Below I offer some solutions to these two problems.

Software

Open Source Alternative
A lot of times if the application one relies on doesn’t work on Linux an alternative piece of software is available. If searching freshmeat.net and sourceforge.net yields no results. Asking on forums may also spark some interest with your application need.

Use Cross Platform Software
As a casual Windows user I like to use software that works on Windows, Linux and BSD variants.
Below are some application categories and solutions.

Development: Zend Studio (Java) Commercial
Development: JEdit (Java) Open Source
Development: Eclipse (Java) Open Source
Mind Mapping: Freemind (Java) Open Source
Project Management: Gantt (Java) Open Source
Graphics: Gimp (C++) Open Source
Graphics: InkScape (C++) Open Source
3D Graphics: Blender3D (C++) Open Source
Instant Messaging: Gaim (C++) Open Source
Instant Messaging: aMSN (C++) Open Source
Office: OpenOffice (C++ & Java) Open Source

Web Applications
Most web applications are cross platform and are very good at the task at hand. Some may be free while others come with a subscription fee. They may be not be as fast as desktop equivalents and response time may vary but web applications are becoming more popular.

Run your Windows applications on Linux
If you do not with to find an alternative piece of software there are some options that may be appealing to you.

Wine
Using a little setup time and a handy toolkit called Wine (Wine is not an emulator) one can run many applications on the Linux desktop without ever touching windows. Except possibly for copying important DLL files.

Cross Over Office
Cross over office is a commercial piece of software which uses wine. It eases the installation process for many supported applications.

Virtual Machines
Virtual Machines are perfect for the more modern faster machines out there. By using the commercial VMWare server (now free) the Open Source Xen or QEMU machine emulators one can run a virtual copy of windows inside an X11 Session. If your machine is powerful enough it may even be faster then an underpowered separate computer.
VMWare Server: http://www.vmware.com/products/server/
Xen: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/Research/SRG/netos/xen/
QEMU: http://www.qemu.org

Another Physical PC
Nobody said that you couldn’t use a Windows box. This obviously provides the most compatibility with the software you may own. Personal Computers continue to drop in price and a reasonably equipped machine that is capable of running an older version of windows can be purchased for a reasonable price.
Potential Problems and Solutions
Space
Purchase a smaller PC
Keyboard / Mouse / Monitor
If you don’t want a separate keyboard, mouse and monitor on your desk you could purchase a KVM and use your current setup.
Use VNC. By using VNC and a LAN connection you can effectively use the computer as if you were right in front of it. I do not recommend this method over wireless connections, as the quality of the VNC session may not be very good.

Hardware

One drawback of using Linux is a lack of hardware support. Although most major hardware is supported often one may run across some strange hardware that is not supported. Often this is also used as an excuse to run Windows.

NDIS Wrapper
If you have a wireless card that has no native driver, it is probably possible to get it working with NDIS Wrapper. This allows one to use Windows wireless drivers under Linux. A friend of mine has successfully used this approach to get his Dell Inspiron wireless working.

Laptop Support
I once owned a Compaq Evo 1000v which I had successfully installed Slackware on. The hardware support seemed buggy at the time, but Linux did run on it. I traded it with a local PC store owner for a smaller underpowered Toshiba Portégé 4010 which I now have a working installation.

Peripherals
Often the techie type PC users have a lot of gadgets. Depending on how many other users have this gadget there may or may not be a driver available. If there is not, all hope is not lost.

VMWare
Sometimes with certain type devices VMWare can be used. I successfully used this method to use Linux with a Parallax PIC micro controller, which is programmable by a serial connection. All that needs to be done here is some toying with the VMWare settings.

Buy new hardware
If you have a need for a particular device and support is available for similar devices. But not your particular piece of hardware, sometimes it is advisable to purchase new hardware.

Develop a solution
If buying new hardware is not an option due to funds or no other available hardware and searching yielded no results. Posting to forums may help. If other users have this hardware maybe some one out there with the skills necessary could start a project. With a project started more owners of this hardware will find the project and may be able to chip-in.

Ignore the problem
If you are really lazy like me you may just choose to wait and do nothing about the hardware support. In some rare cases this approach will work. Ignoring the lack of hardware support and just using Linux anyway is sometimes a better approach. For example, my roommate refused to use Linux on his main PC because there was no support for his second on board Ethernet so he used Windows. What baffled me was that he wasn’t even using the second Ethernet card under windows. Some time passed and a new kernel got released, low and behold a driver for his controller is now included. He finally installs Linux and went through all of the trouble of backing up files and the installation routine again. This could have been avoided if Linux was used to begin with.
If the hardware doesn’t cause any system problems then the only problem is that the device simply doesn’t work.

Conclusion
The best way to learn Linux is to become surrounded with it.
It is easy to use Linux as a primary operating system and for those interested in Information Technology and a lot can be learned.

So which is better for me?
I could say that Windows is less practical for me because it does not always provide the flexibility I need. Constant issues with stability and drivers not working also become a problem when it is not possible for me to repair them.

After using Linux as my primary operating system for a while it has become clear how much users are restrained by using Windows. For example I have become accustomed to the Xfce 4 keyboard shortcuts and I create workspaces for different groups of applications I have running to perform a certain task. With my Windows PC at work there is no way for me to organize my windows in a way that makes sense to me. I find my self closing all applications and opening them one by one to reorder them in a way that makes sense. My productivity is higher when I am working on a Linux Box. Therefore I would say that Linux is my preferred choice.