Linux Blog

Mandatory New Years Post

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:37 pm on Monday, January 2, 2012

Happy new year! I guess it’s time for a yearly update, I feel like everyone else has done it and now its my turn. Hit the jump for some more statistics that are probably only interesting to yours truly.

Top 10 Posts
Interestingly enough none of these were written this year. Perhaps I should write a query to extract the most popular ones of this year, I’m not sure they’re getting the same search love as my older stuff.

Using cut, Shellscript string manipulation 8.54%
Handy Linux Wallpaper 7.33%
Shell script to get user input 7.18%
The Linux Blog 6.38%
Rsync to SMB Share 4.26%
Apache director index forbidden by options directive 3.97%
Working with CSV files in bash 3.64%
Rotating videos in Linux 2.46%
Recursive md5 sum script 2.28%
iphone ssh client 2.04%

(Read on …)

Goals For The New Year

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Wednesday, January 6, 2010

As the new year has turned, I thought it would be a good time to go back and look at my goals for 2009. To be honest they were pretty modest and I’d pretty much forgotten what they were, despite this fact I still managed to get 4 out of the 6 done. Getting certified never happened, but I feel like I became more qualified, which is all that matters right? Hah. I blame the CD ripping on streaming media services like Pandora, Grooveshark and last.fm which pretty much eliminated my need to rip the CD’s. So all in all I guess it was a productive year.

I’m still working on my technical related goals for this coming year, I don’t really know what to put on the list yet, since I’ve found that goals will change as time goes on. For example, I set up my PBX in November of 09 which was about 11 months after I set the goal that I had forgotten about. Maybe I’ll roll the two I did not accomplish in 2009 over, add a the goals of getting more organized and reducing the amount of equipment I have. Yea, those seem reasonable for now.

Happy new year!

Things I don’t want to do in 2009.

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:59 am on Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Things I don't want to do in 2009
Since we are now in the second month of 2009 I figured it would be a good time to follow up on My Goals for 2009. I have not made much progress on my goals, but hey any progress is progress right? This post is my list of things that I do not want to repeat in 2009, either from 2008 or before. Only the first item is non-technical and this list is not quite as long as my list of things I want to achieve in 2009. I’m sure I’ll think of more as the year goes on. Again, its not an all-inclusive list and I hopefully won’t have to come and amend this document too quickly, if at all, oh who am I kidding I should probably add to this before I even post it.

We’ll start off what happened to me on new years eve 2008. To say the least I got very drunk, meaning that I was so hung over that I couldn’t function. Therefore I spent the rest of the day in bed, I’ll try not to make a repeat of this in 2009 on any account. New years eve or not, what a way to start the new year.

I’m pretty sure that I did this one in 2008, if not I’ve done it in the past and do not want to repeat it. It involves some personal data and a mistyped command, resulting in data loss. What about backups? Well it doesn’t help if the mistyped command was intended to make a backup of the data rather than destroy it.

Working on production machines. This is a touchy subject, sometimes there are times you HAVE to work with production machines, there is just no way around it. What I aim to do, is not work on them as often. For example, I can copy a portion of a live database to my development machine and work on it from there rather than just copy the database or table on a production machine. This way I will prevent locking up tables with a poorly written query and perhaps avoid a restore from backup or rather large oh $#@! moment.

I don’t want to run a certain distribution for my servers in 2009. I’ll keep the distribution anonymous in this one but those that know me will know one of my dirty little secrets. It’s not them, its me. It involves a bleeding edge distribution that gets updated every six months or so. In short it shouldn’t be used in a production environment. I wasn’t involved in the decision to run this distribution but I will be involved in solving this nightmare.

To end this list I give you the epic chmod 755 -R while in the root directory. I don’t think this one needs any more explanation.

Crontabs 101

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:42 pm on Sunday, January 4, 2009

Although not necessarily classified as shell scripting its self cron’s are very useful to any Linux administrators arsenal. The ability to run tasks at a specific interval is a great way to schedule things to run later or when the system load is lower. Many applications use crontab to schedule tasks so its hard to say what yours will look like.

crontab -l

will list all of the cron jobs scheduled for the currently logged in user mine has an entry for kpodder

# (Cron version V5.0 -- $Id: crontab.c,v 1.12 2004/01/23 18:56:42 vixie Exp $)
#KPodder entries
0 0 * * * kpodder.sh -c "/home/owen/.kde/share/apps/kpodder/" -s "global.casts" -o "/home/owen/podcasts" -d 0
#KPodder End

The first five fields are to tell the task when to run. They are in the following order: minute, hour, day, month, day of the week. Asterisks are used to say any valid value and a forward slash can be used to make intervals such as five minutes, hours, days or months (*/5). A comma can be used for or values, so if used as 2,4,6 the cron would run at 2, 4 or 6 o’clock. Dashes are used for time spans, If you have an 8-5 work day you can use 8-17 if in the hours field.

Next, the sixth field is the actual program to run. It will look in the $PATH for the user, but for safety’s sake, I try to use the full path if possible. In my example of the kpodder script there are many arguments. I only really use simple crons and the number of arguments here seems rather excessive.

To edit the crontab do crontab -e. This will edit the current users crontab. If you are root and wish to edit a naughty cron from another user you use -u and specify the user.

Thats pretty much all there is to it. I’d love to here tips and how much people love/hate cron and why.

Happy Shell Scripting New Year,

- Owen.

Linux Blog new year roundup

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:16 pm on Monday, December 31, 2007

I’d just like to say I’ve been busy over the past week or two with some projects at work and with the holiday season so I haven’t had the time to dedicated to this blog.

Its been a good year at the Linux Blog, I’ve increased traffic since I’ve started and have been beginning to see more activity with comments. I have a couple of goals for the upcoming year.

Firstly I’d like to make some money with Google ads. This isn’t specifically related to the Linux Blog but every little counts. I want to do this because I think that this site has some value to those that use it and I would like to be rewarded for my hard work.

Another goal I have is to write more posts than I did this year. It shouldn’t be hard to do since I stopped writing for a long time in 2007. From about Jan to July. I have a long list of posts to write but I need to know what topics people want to read about.

I have a list of articles to write for the Shell Scripting Sundays column but haven’t got enough ideas for the year yet. I may be able to get a few more if I split some of the more intense ones up but I’d rather keep them simple. If any one has any ideas for articles please let me know.

Thats going to be all for this year, I hope you enjoyed reading my blog and continue to visit me in the new year. For those that do

Happy New Year!