Linux Blog

Run Levels in a Nutshell

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:03 am on Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Run levels in Linux are a great thing. Basically, a run level is by definition a configuration for a group of processes. The run levels and default run level is specified in /etc/inittab. Most Linux systems these days, with exception of a few boot into run level 5 which is generally a graphical user interface such as KDM or GDM. The others boot into run level 3 most servers will boot into this run level which is multi-user with networking but no X, and is many users preference.

To define what run level your system boots into by default you would edit the /etc/inittab file and edit the line similar to:

 id:5:initdefault:

This is run level 5, if you wanted to switch to command line you’d change the 5 to 3 and vice versa.

If your not ready to make the jump yet but would like to check it out, you can (as root) use the command telinit to tell init to change run level. If you are in run level 5, try (be prepared to lose everything in X, as it will kill everything for you)

 telinit 3

If you are doing maintenance, you may want to switch to level 1 which is single user mode. Level 2 on Fedora is the same as 3 except it doesn’t have NFS support.

Level 0 is halt and run level 6 is reboot which are the best ones to accidentally set as a default run level (trust me on this one.) For more information on the different run levels check out the man pages.

Linux Related Ads

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:31 pm on Monday, December 17, 2007

I’ve added some advertising to this blog to help offset the cost of running the server, I hope you guys don’t mind too much.

Every so often I see a banner ad for a product I once stumbled across on the net once. The product is Bomgar and they basically specialize in remote support appliances. I was interested in this product because they actually support major Linux distributions – now that is neat!

Basically in a nutshell your client goes to your website and clicks a button it installs temporary software on their computer and you get to support it, there are a ton more features that are in nifty flash animations on their site. Did I mention that it runs on major Linux distributions? That is a great feature in my opinion, they have support for SUSE, Ubuntu, Fedora and Red Hat. Impressive. If you currently support a Linux network this could be a great little box. Its a little pricey but in my opinion the cost may be worth it for the ability to easily support Linux boxes. I’d like to support a company that sees the need for enterprise Linux solutions.

I would like to see an open source solution that is similar to this but doesn’t have the price tag. If you know of one, let me know!