Linux Blog

LINUTOP 2 Review

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Hardware,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:08 pm on Friday, November 9, 2012

Linutop is a company based out of Paris that specializes in small form factor energy efficient embedded type PC’s. They have  a variety of devices with no moving parts and utilize open source software based on Ubuntu for the platform. They were kind enough to send me a Linutop 2 to review.Linutop 2


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How to talk openly about open source software

Filed under: General Linux,Linux for Newb's — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:42 am on Thursday, May 26, 2011

Today we have a guest post written by Whitney from Technected. Whitney majored in journalism and has been using Linux ever since. She now works for a large automotive corporation in the Midwest. In her spare time she enjoys playing video games, gardening and watching Dr. Who.

You already know Linux is superior. There’s a reason you downloaded it, even if you had to overwrite your pre-programmed OS. You painstakingly created partitioned files for your /boot, /swap, root and /home files. You even bought a stuffed penguin — the Jesus fish of Linux users — to proudly display on your desk.

With great power comes great responsibility, though. Suddenly, everyone is asking you why Linux is so great, and if they should download it. Once you’ve worked with an OS for so long, it’s sometimes hard to simplify your answers for them, so here’s a handy list of answers for the masses

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Does a room without Windows have doors?

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 5:29 pm on Friday, May 15, 2009

I was e-mailed an interesting project from the folks that run AyeTea (Pronounced IT) that I thought people might be interested in. Here is the description they sent:

A Room Without Windows is a new project set to launch on the 1st of June 2009.  Scheduled to last for 31 days, the basis of the project is to take long term Windows users and deprive them of their familiar software.  Our IT lab rats will have one month to find open source software that will replace the function of their Windows based machines.

This is an interesting concept and one that I think will succeed. It will either open or close doors by letting people try out Linux and those that like it will stick with it, and those that don’t will go back to using whatever they were using before, which seems to be Windows. There are two “lab rats” which will be experimented on, I’ll definitely tune into see how it goes.

As far as learning, and replacing everything they do with an open source application, it should not really be too hard. There are replacements for just about everything with the exception of perhaps very popular large cad engines, but again, they’re IT folk so what are they going to be using cad for? Anyway, letting Windows go is sometimes the best way to use Linux and learn. Hopefully they’ll do ok.

So Derek and Blair, you have a DOS background, and you’re going to be using Linux for a month, it should bring back memories. Just don’t be hating if it turns out badly, and try not to lose your job over this.

Full details of the project are available here: http://www.ayetea.com/announcing-a-room-without-windows.html

Sorting lists with Sort

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:11 pm on Wednesday, June 4, 2008

There comes a time when it is useful to know how to sort lists. Thankfully using open source software sorting text files can be very easy.

This example shows how to sort a file alphabetically using the sort command. I assume that you have a text file in mind so I will skip the creation of that. There are two ways to sort the file with the sort command. The first being the preferred method but not always suitable.

sort [textfile]
 
cat [textfile] | sort

That’s it! The second method can be useful if you would like to do any thing special, for example searching with grep, using cut or sed for data extraction or just out of convenience. Check out the man page for sort for more information on all of the options!

Why I Love Open Source Software

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:32 pm on Thursday, April 10, 2008

Have you been looking for a piece of software that does exactly what you want it to? Perhaps its a tool for a client, or an application that would just make your life easier. On a daily basis I always am thinking of new things that I would like my favorite applications to do.

I am going to be writing within the next couple of days about my favorite CHM tools. One of the useful ones I use is a great little tool and it gets the job done, but it doesn’t do EXACTLY what I want. This is why I love open source. I can simple grab the source and change it if I need to. That is the freedom you are given.

Well, I’m not exactly the best C coder in the world but, given time if the application is that critical to me I can make the changes. I can get help from communities when needed and read free information on the web all day long to help me get the job done. If I can’t figure out how to do it in the language the application was written in its not a problem, I can analyze the source code and possibly find a work around. One powerful work around for the CHM application is the Shell.

This is one of the reasons I love open source software. There are many others, feel free to chip in and say why you love open source!

Comments Are Back!

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:03 am on Saturday, December 8, 2007

Ok, I’ve decided to add comments back to The Linux Blog. The idea behind commends is that people post comments for help, advice, questions, comments on the article or just to be nice. Before this was not happening so I turned them off. Now, I’ve re-added them back hoping that people will actually comment.

The spam problem has been fixed and we should not see any spammy comments since posters now have to be approved.

I’ll leave them on for a while and see how it does. In other news I’ve been writing like mad, trying to get some good articles written.

On the list of stuff to write are a couple of Shell Scripting articles, one about IP Soft Phones for Linux, Battery Life & Optimization, virtualization. I also have some tutorials that I would really like to write to help people out with WordPress and other web applications that run on open source software such as MediaWiki.

If you have any questions, or would like to request something, now you can actually just comment , so go ahead, leave a comment

Phones meet Linux.

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:45 pm on Saturday, July 28, 2007

It’s been a while since I have last posted. In this time probably the most anticipated piece of hardware for this year has been released. You know what it is already. Yes, thats right the iPhone. I must say its a very nice consumer level phone. Will I buy one? Probably not.

Why?
I hear you ask.

Well the answer is simple. I believe there are phones that can better suit my purposes than the iPhone. Sure its cool and it maybe great for the average Joe who wants everything all of the trend setters have. But I can’t settle for that. Ever since the release fan boys have been drooling over it. I took a sneak peak into the Apple store after it was released to avoid the mayhem of the release and got to play with it. I thought wow, Apple has actually done a pretty good job here. I was quite happy and saddened at the same time.
In retaliation I had to get at least some ammo before I gave in against the fan boys, so I have been looking at all types of phones recently. Using, looking for and reviewing new gadgets is always fun. I found that most of the more advanced phones that are on the shelves at the major cell phone network stores (with a few exceptions), are Windows Mobile phones and I have some major problems with Windows Mobile Edition but thats another post in its self.

So what choices do I have if I am to upgrade to a new phone to crush the competitors?

I think for a couple of minutes about the potential uses for mobiles. Then I decide that it will have to be a phone that is stylish, flexible in what I can do with and it must also be free to develop for. I want this because I like and believe in the open source software community. I know that developers will create great source code and bleeding edge applications will be released. Free to develop for platforms will be more customizable for a specific purpose then any closed source software will ever be.

There are two phones that I have been recently been looking at in detail which would be good mobile phone candidates for my desired applications.

The Nokia E70 (http://www.nokiausa.com/E70)
I have not had a chance to use or review a E70 but from what I have read about it it seems like a nice little mobile communications device. The sad part is that the E70 doesn’t run Linux it actually runs Symbian OS v9.1. What I like about it is that its not too flashy which means it wont draw too much attention (unlike the iPhone). If I were to be in a dodgy area, I could probably still whip it out to make a quick call without getting shanked over a smart phone. It flips over and has a full split QWERTY keyboard and the screen sits in the middle. One of the more useful things to me is that it has a terminal so that I could in theory do practically anything I need to from it. The Symbian OS, has a development kit available and has some applications which have spawned from open applications (such as a SQL database which is based on an implementation of SQLite). This phone is packed with features.

One feature that stands out to me is bearer mobility. This will allow applications to seamlessly move from one carrier to another (for example, from 3G to WLAN), without having to re-initiate network connections. Since this little device requires little to no initial hacking to work I may consider it since it will basically allow me to show off Linux based applications with a terminal and for a modest 18 Euro’s for graphical applications a VNC Viewer can be used.

The OpenMoko (http://www.openmoko.com/)
All I have to say about this one is wow. I just found out about this yesterday and I don’t know how I went so long without hearing about it from some of my fellow Linux users. Especially with all the iPhone hype going on at the moment. I guess I got tied up in it. To me it looks better than the iPhone. It comes in two colors standard which I point out because you know Apple is going to release a pink, yellow, silver, blue, red and charge a premium for it They may over the years release som other ugly colors such as brown with green lights. Oh wait thats Microsoft (sorry to get off track of the important Linux Phone topic at hand).
The OpenMoko team make it a quite clear that they want people to hack it. They have made it easy for all types of developers and hackers. Open Source code, USB, bluetooth a JTAG port, serial console support, an I2C bus and easy solder contact pads make this device expandable in so many different ways. They even sell a kit which includes equipment needed to modify it.

I don’t think I can explain what potential the OpenMoko Linux based phone has. The many ways it could be used and the never ending possibilities of it blows my mind. In my eyes it can achieve virtually anything.

Conclusion
There you have it, the non Linux based E70 and the Linux based OpenMoko phones. Two cool and more capable out of the box alternatives to that one fashion accessory phone that everybody is raving about. What was the name of it again? I seem to have forgotten already.