Linux Blog

Mikogo Calling for Beta Testers

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:32 pm on Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Mikogo is calling for beta testers for their Linux version. The best way I can explain it is an alternative to webex, goto/live meeting or perhaps Bomgar. While not open source it is a free service and anyone making an effort to bring quality applications to the Linux desktop deserves a mention. I believe this is an application that Linux users could really benefit from using (I know I could) so sign up to be a beta tester and give them some feed back that will help them produce a great product people will want to use.
Mikogo

The Gimp Tutorials

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 am on Thursday, December 2, 2010

gimp tutorialsI’ll start off saying I’m graphically challenged, well more like anything visually related, I’m so bad I can’t even match my clothes properly. If you have you seen my work (check out the Free DVD Ripper Software post for a classic example) this should be obvious. I do however do all of my own stunts graphics . I remember when I used to work with a bunch of Photoshop Guru’s, they could do pretty much anything with Photoshop. They were deadly, I once saw them take a picture of our co-workers and shop it so that they were kissing other people. Apart from the system administrators these are the people I’d be least likely to pull a prank on, these guys were just pure dangerous. When I asked them how they learned to ‘shop the most common response was not from school but from the web. They pointed me to some good resources that they use to pull off certain things.

So The Gimp is everyone’s favorite open source image editing software right? Well, here are some similar websites to those mentioned above.

http://gimp-tutorials.net/

http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/

http://www.gimp-tutorials.com/

With these sites and a some time you’ll be a master like much better than me and I’ve spent hours on this stuff. You do have to admit though, my shop’n skills have got better as time has passed I some how managed to make all of these graphics Freemind Vs. Kdissert, Linux Server Monitoring, Thunderbird localmail spool and Linux Backup Utility Roundtable

http://www.thelinuxblog.com/thunderbird-localmail-spool/http://www.thelinuxblog.com/thunderbird-localmail-spool/ lo

Linux Users are Lazy

Filed under: Linux Video Tutorials,The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:57 pm on Thursday, May 7, 2009

Some one told me once that all of the good system administrators are lazy, I believe this but I also think that Linux users are lazy. While I’m not a full time systems administrator, I am a full time Linux user. I sometimes think that I’m so lethargic that I don’t have the energy to turn on a light switch. Hence why I did this (youtube video)

If you couldn’t make it out from the crappy iphone video, it’s my house, I show the circuit, turn the light off, walk in the closet and walk back out again. It’s a rather simple circuit consisting of a switch wired to a halogen light I brought from Ikea. In true open source fashion, if any one is interested in this, let me know and I’ll share how I did it if you can’t figure it out.

Impressed with the PostgreSQL Installer

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:48 am on Monday, April 27, 2009

Until today I had never installed PostgreSQL from the Binary provided at postgresql.org since it’s pretty much always in some form of repository provided by most distributions. Today, for the first time ever I installed it and have to say I’m very impressed with the installer. I some what shuddered as I saw a “install shield” type installer interface, as my past encounters with these have generally tended to not work out so well. What I noticed about the PostgreSQL installer though was different from the “install shield”, it was BitRock. BitRock is a cross platform installer for “Windows, Linux, OS X and more…” as this was my first experience with BitRock with a Linux machine I have to say it was a positive one. It allowed me to install PostgreSQL with some custom components pretty effortlessly. While most won’t need to do a custom installation as PostgreSQL will probably be in a repository, its handy to know that the installer works.

BitRock does not appear to have a completely free license but they do seem to give open source projects a “free copy.” Not sure how I feel about this, but I guess if they’re out to make money then it could work for them. Apparentely it doesn’t take much to please me on a mundane Monday morning, I’d have been perfectly fine with a tarball and manual configuration but the GUI has brightened up my day. Thanks BitRock! Does any one else have any encounters or shocking experience with installers? What about BitRock in general?

Open Source Stickers

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:13 pm on Monday, April 6, 2009

Open Source StickersEveryday that I browse the internet I usually bookmark a ton of stuff, well today I’m posting one of those things that have been stuck in my bookmarks for ages.

Everybody loves stickers, but these stickers are special because they’re all open source related and you have to make them yourself. There are two volumes each with at the least a metric ton of stickers in them. I browsed through them and found some I really liked. I don’t have a sticker maker but they print well on a colour laser and  look great stuck on my wall at the office. I guess its a good thing I don’t have a sticker maker, nobody likes sticker mildew. http://openstickers.com

DFD Today

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:48 pm on Wednesday, March 25, 2009

No, not Dataflow Diagram. Document freedom day. Undoubtedly you’re are aware that it is today, given the amount of press it has got and what a good cause. I was thinking about how I could participate in Document Freedom Day. A few things came to mind. The first was was:

“How about I save all my documents in .odt, that will teach them.”

No go on that one, I already do that because I’m too lazy to save into .doc. I also call the “open source” people out on it when they ask me to save as .doc because it “works on Windows”.

“I could translate all the .doc’s and .docx’s on the file server to an open format.”

Well, my wife just lost her job, I don’t need to lose mine too, although it would be hilarious and it would raise awareness.

Too bad, I’ll have to do nothing this year, perhaps next year I can join the celebration if there is a “Team” in my area. They should really make it a Friday. I’d totally go out and down a few beers in the name of document freedom.

Reasons Why You Should Jailbreak YOUR iPhone

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:10 am on Wednesday, January 28, 2009



I’m pretty sure that most Linux users understand what jailbreaking the iPhone is. For those that don’t in short its a way of breaking the restrictions Apple put on your phone, which allows you to escape the sandbox and do more with the phone.

Sure, jailbreaking may void your warranty (or may not) but why would you want to do it? Well the first and foremost reason is freedom.
Some of the greatest organizations in the open source industry were spawned from the inability to work with a particular device. I think jailbreaking your iPhone is similar to this, while the tools are so easy to use that any one can do it, jailbreaking your iPhone gives you the freedom to do what you want with it and this is what its all about right?

Bash. We all know that Mac OSX is based off of BSD and it just so happens the iPhone is too. By jailbreaking your phone part of the default installation (depending on how you do it) is a terminal with a bash shell. Most Linux users should be right at home here with utilities like apt-get, aptitude and ping.

Perl, Python, Java, PHP. These are some of the languages that you can configure to run on the iPhone. Sure, they may need some tweaking (especially Perl.) But it can be done. Who said iPhone development had to be done in Objective C?

Along with the Bash shell comes the Open SSH package giving you the ability to SSH into your phone, should you choose to install and configure. This can come in very handy for the Linux hacker. The ability to pretty much manipulate your phone however you want is a great reason to jailbreak.

You’ve always wanted to be able to record video right? Well you can, that is if you jailbreak and install an application. While the video quality is not exactly up to par its better than nothing. You could even turn your phone into a robot if you wished.

Also, do it because the Woz says so. Well, actually he didn’t explicitly say to do it, but apparently he does advocate it and “hacked” some chick called Griffin’s phone. So come on, be that “Throbbing brain with a tie” and jailbreak your iPhone.

The Economy and Open Source

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:53 am on Monday, October 6, 2008

The word on the street, at least all over the news is that we could be heading into bad times. All over the news sites are articles on how Open Source will or could save you money. For individuals that know about GNU/Linux, it is not a question that if you are building a new PC and you run Linux, you are going to save $100 from not having to buy an operating system. Often there are comparable applications that may be used as alternatives and a little more money could be saved. Many argue that time is money, you get your licenses when you buy a new PC, etc. I don’t know the exact answer, it’s hard to say for each individual case but I have not spent any money on software in a long time.

I don’t know if Open Source will gain more momentum because of the economy and I don’t think that any one knows for sure. All that can be done is speculate and correlate data.

Here are some Links to other articles on this topic for those that are interested:
Open Source To The Rescue In Hard Times
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2008/10/open_source_to.html

Linux and FOSS in a Slowing Economy
http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/linux-and-foss-slowing-economy

Some Linux Blog News!

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:48 pm on Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Hey there guys and gals,

I’ve got a few pieces of news to report today, mostly to do with this site so if you are interested, give it a read. If you couldn’t care less then skip right along to the next post :)

Advertising
I will be adding the adbard network to this site one day soon, which will get rid of the Google ads and display some that are more of an open source theme. I may from time to time pop in some links to Amazon affiliate links to help with the costs involved in running this site. I don’t think that you’ll mind, and besides you don’t really have a choice. If you don’t want to see advertisements; learn How to set up a Squid Proxy Server.

I’ve changed my name!
I’ve changed my name (not legally) to display as TheLinuxBlog.com. I’ve done this because many people syndicate my content and are not correctly attributing my work. Don’t worry, I’ll still post guest posters names and sign my posts with my name so you’ll know its me (But I doubt you care anyway, just as long as there is decent content here or you find the answer to the Linux problem that has you stumped.)

Feeds Shortened
I’ll be shortening my RSS feed in effort to draw more people to participate in the site. After all, we all like comments and contributions, so why not contribute? This may also help out with spam also. If you’d still like my full feed in your RSS feed reader, send me an e-mail or leave a comment and I’ll hook you up with a private feed.

Artwork
For those of you that enjoy laughing I mean, reading my blog I’ll be providing some artwork. I’d appreciate links to me with or without the artwork. I may in the future start giving out free swag so be on the lookout!

Thanks for your interest and time,

– Owen.

Dealing with the HTML file input limitation of uploading multiple files

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:59 am on Thursday, August 28, 2008

Everybody knows how annoying the <input type=”file”> HTML tag is right? Does it make you mad when you have to browse and upload each file individually? Sure you can use JavaScript to add / remove the input boxes, but you still need to browse for each file individually, which if you’re uploading lots of files doesn’t make sense.

Would you like a multiple file uploader like Facebook has? Perhaps more of a simple explorer like interface that will allow you to select multiple files? Possibly previewing them, and perhaps processing them on the client side?

Well, I wouldn’t say it was the easiest thing in the world to implement but there is an open source multiple file uploader that might suit your needs. Since its written in Java, its highly expandable (if you know how or pay a development company or freelancer) and can also be partially configured with JavaScript.

What is this fantastic sounding multiple file uploader you speak of?

Its called jupload and can be downloaded from jupload.sourceforge.net. Don’t let the website fool you because this tool is actually pretty neat.

If any one would like examples on how to use it, just write a blog post linking to me saying how cool it is and how much you need it, offer me cash, comment or participate in this blog, offer me goods / services, give me links from your website or just e-mail me politely asking for help and I’ll see what I can do.

If you don’t like it: start reading the documentation like I did, seriously its not that hard.

Wakoopa For Linux

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 am on Monday, March 31, 2008

I stumbled across Jakes blog post over at: http://blogs.howtogeek.com/jatecblog/posts/software-tracker-for-linux. Until this point I had never heard of the Wakoopa service. It seems like a really good idea. It is sort of the Alexa for software applications. Naturally I left a comment showing interest in an open source Wakoopa and shortly after received an e-mail from Jake.

Here it is:

Hello Owen, 

First I'd like to clarify that I don't actually have a need for the 
application tracker... it would be purely for fun. That said, I would love if 
you would be willing to create this. Here is the idea I have envisioned in 
more detail but do not have the skills to create:

1) The process list is purged every so often to generate a log file.
2) The log file is periodically sent to a server. It is cleared after each 
time it is uploaded.
3) The server then has an application which goes through and sorts out process 
names and so forth and presents them as user reader data (much like Wakoopa) 

I think that this would be the easiest way, but I'd love to hear your 
suggestions. If you were to make this I think it would be used and loved by many, as well as being useful.

Now that he has broken it down like that it seems like it would be pretty easy to implement. The only thing that I can see being a little bit complicated is determining what processes are running and how long they have been running for. I hopefully have a short shell script up for next Sundays column and have some sort of prototype. There should be nothing new in this script that I haven’t covered before on this blog, except possibly the sort command. Other commands I plan to know I will probably use are ps or top, cat and echo. There will probably be lots of loops and conditional if’s. The good thing about this idea is that if I write a shell script to do this some one will be able to translate it into another language. The real part where I would like to spend the majority of my time would be in the web interface. I expect that this will be written in PHP but I am unsure of the database technology that will be used since the recent happenings with MySQL.

So when this open source Wakoopa prototype is finished how many people do you think will use this service? Would you use it? What do you think an acceptable update time is? Any one have any other questions / input?

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