Linux Blog

Microsoft Office 2007 Suite, Under Wine.

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:07 am on Monday, December 10, 2007

I was browsing around and found this blog post on Using Microsoft Office on Linux with Wine. I’ll have to give it a try some time to see if it runs properly, if it does I don’ t want to hear any of the
“I need Microsoft Office” excuses.

There are plenty of alternatives, Open Office, KOffice, VMWare, Wine/CXOffice. The only real reason I’d want to use Office 2007 on Linux would be for opening the documents that people send me in the 2007 format and the new features of Excel. For every day computing I actually use Open Office myself. Check out the screenshots from the link, it looks pretty smooth (Unlike Photoshop under Wine).

Recent changes to The Linux Blog.

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:39 pm on Sunday, July 29, 2007

This article is mostly just updates on the site.

Server Changes
I have recently moved the site to a new server. This was a fairly simple task which took longer than it should because of DNS issues.

Now that it is on the new Linux based web host all should be dandy. The fact that I have more flexibility over the old host is an added bonus.

Bugs

Some problems that surfaced after I moved the site have just been resolved in a matter of minutes ago.

The biggest problem the site had was that the detailed/archive WordPress URL’s were not getting processed correctly. I was aware of the problem last night but was too tired to fix it. The fix was simple. I had to place the .htaccess file in the directory. The problem was that when I used lftp to mirror the old code, it didn’t download the hidden .htaccess file. I should have checked this before I updated the DNS but I guess something will always go wrong and I’m glad it was a simple fix. When I figure out how to mirror a directory in lftp including hidden files I will be sure to let everyone know. After scanning the help for the mirror command it didn’t jump out at me, but maybe thats just because I’m tired.
The URL’s that were affected by the bug were:

http://www.thelinuxblog.com/2007/07/29/shell-script-sundays/

http://www.thelinuxblog.com/2007/07/28/phones-meet-linux/

New Category Created
Not only did I fix this little problem, I also created the Shell Script Sundays section and moved the related posts to that category. The When Photoshop Fails article was posted on a Monday but I did most of the writing on Sunday, so I believe that since its mostly a shell scripting article it is worthy of this category.

After writing a paragraph in the description section of WordPress, I realized that it doesn’t actually show up anywhere on the site. I’m unsure if it shows up in the RSS feeds or not but I’m going to post it here anyway for the web browsers.

Shell Script Sundays Description
This section of the site is dedicated to Linux shell scripts. Twice a month I will post a nifty shell script that will perform a certain task. Most of the scripts will be written in Bash or the Korn shell and occasionally a CLI PHP or Perl script may surface. Some scripts will be more advanced than others and some will require additional software to be installed. This section will show how powerful scripting can be and I hope it educates people on how to shell script with Linux.

More to come!

Expect a Linux related post within the next few days. I have hundreds of topics to choose from, but I am always willing to take peoples suggestions on what to blog about. So if there is a particular topic that interests you, just contact us and we’ll do our best to cater to your needs.

Ciao,

- Owen.

When Photoshop Fails

Filed under: General Linux,Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:50 pm on Monday, January 15, 2007

I was recently assigned the task of reducing the quality of over 1000 images. My first instinct was to use photoshop’s batch functions to complete the task. After playing around with it for a little while it became apparent that you cannot save files for web with spaces in. Photoshop had failed me. My next idea was to use a bash script to loop over every file and process the image. This was sure to work. Since I have prior experience with image processing I decided to use ImageMagick to complete the task. The command to adjust the quality is:

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convert (FILENAME) -quality 50 (FILENAME)

This command is useless on its own so using a for loop I came up with:

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#!/bin/bash
for i in $(ls); do
convert $i -quality 50 $i
done

This script would have worked for me if there were no spaces in the filenames. Because there were it took each filename that had spaces and ran the command on each part of the file name. Unfortunately this was not going to work.

After googling for a while it became apparent that I was not the only person to have the problem of spaces in filenames with for loops. The solution I found was to use the find command and a while loop. Below is working script that successfully completed the task in no time:

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#!/bin/bash
find * -iname "*" | \
while read I; do
convert "$I" -quality 50 "$I"
done

This script could be easily modified to take advantage of ImageMagick’s many other functions. For example it could be used to batch resize a folder of images to make thumbnails by changing the command to:

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convert "$I" -resize 200 "$I"

Or it could be used to overlay text onto an image with the following command:

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convert "$I" -gravity southeast -annotate +5+10 "thelinuxblog.com" -fill black "$I"

As shown above ImageMagick is really powerful image editing software which can easily be used with the bash shell to process thousands of images with no trouble.