Linux Blog

10 Amazing Productivity Tools You Can’t Live Without

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:30 pm on Tuesday, December 18, 2012

This is a guest post from Ella.

As a small business owner, the Internet has changed the way I collaborate and work with my colleagues, contractors and clients. The business world is becoming more global all the time, and collaboration and communication are more important than ever.

Check out these slick little tools (some familiar, some new) that can help you stay on top of things and make working together across the Web a breeze.

(Read on …)

Lite Reading : a Review of SQLite by Chris Newman

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:45 pm on Monday, June 15, 2009

SQLite This review is sort of a long time coming. The book is simply called SQLite. SQLite (the book) was written by Chris Newman (0-672-32685-X) and is one of the books in the Developer’s Library from InformIT. Books in the Developer’s Library are designed for programmers as high quality references and tutorials on technical subjects. I believe that this is the first book that I have read and personally owned in the series. The book’s “tag-line” so to speak is:
A practical guide to using, administering, and programming the database bundled with PHP 5
and hits it right on the mark. While the book is small it packs a punch. Chris Newman makes it a point to go into detail where needed and skip the parts that are not necessary. One one of my gripes about programming books is that they contain too much programming and logic basics.

The book is split up into three logical parts, Part I consisting of General SQLite Usage, Part II Using SQLite Programming Interfaces and Part III SQLite Administration.

Part I has four chapters the first not being entirely necessary for the SQL guru, but I learned a few things that I would not have known otherwise, and it was a quick read if you skip the basic SQL stuff. The second through forth chapters are on actually working with SQLite such as the structures, syntax / usage and query optimization.

Part II is a chapter for each interface (PHP, C/C++, Perl, Tcl and Python.) Whether you use each of these technologies or not is irrelevant since it is invaluable as a reference if you wished to use your existing databases with these languages. Reading all of these chapters are not needed if you have no intention of using the language right away.

Part III discusses administration and the SQLite Virtual Database Engine. For me just wanting to learn SQLite the section on the VDBE was a little overkill, but interesting none the less. I like that it was included and think it will be useful in the future.

Overall I think SQLite has a good balance for SQL newbies and seasoned gurus just wanting to quickly get up to speed and implement SQLite. It has everything I’ve needed and then some for my tinkering with SQLite.

Optimus Maximus OLED keyboard – Linux Support

Filed under: Linux Hardware — TheLinuxBlog.com at 8:00 pm on Friday, February 22, 2008

I was reading a post on Tech.Blorge and thought I’d write a little about it.

I think that this keyboard is a little over priced at the moment, but the price is sure to drop. If I got my hands on one of these here are the things that I would do with it:

  1. Impress my friends
  2. Make it have some kind of fireworks effect where every key you hit makes some sort of explosion on the keys around it. Who doesn’t love fireworks?
  3. Matrix Keyboard. This would be pretty sweet. Just have it constantly waste power by scrolling the Matrix code down it all the time. No one will ever use your computer because they won’t be able to figure out where that blasted key they are looking for is.
  4. Write a movie player so that I could watch a movie on my keyboard instead of working.
  5. Make a game that tests hand eye-coordination. Kind of like BrainAge except you use your hands and don’t have a 1″ screen.
  6. Gaming. I’d love for my keys to change when I play any game. Lets take Quake or Halo for example. It should always flash the mother of all weapons the either the B.F.G or the Rocket Launcher.

I love the shift feature and the special characters feature is pretty cool too but there are better practical uses of this keyboard:

  1. System Stats. Lets say WiFi signal strength, CPU load and memory usage Why display them in Torsmo, gkrellm or anything else you can just move your fingers and see the percentage of memory being used.
  2. Syntax highlighting while programming. I think that this would be a nice feature for new developers and for programmers not familiar with a particular programming language. An example would be the IF syntax. Once you type if, the space bar highlights. Next the left parenthesis then the quote depending on which programming language you use.

If any one gets one of these working I’d love to see it in action. I also thing it should be mandatory that when your OS crashes (no matter what OS your running) it displays the B.S.O.D.