Linux Blog

How Android apps are useful to get new blogging ideas

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:51 pm on Thursday, October 18, 2012

 

This post is a guest post written by Brianne. She is blogger by profession. These days she is working on online promotion for Go Pilot

It is true that the bloggers will need some applications which will help them to connect with their blogging on the move. So the Android applications come handy in this connection. Moreover, you will keep touch always through these applications with your blog. Since, the Android applications provide the ample advantages to the bloggers. Even, these Android applications will give you an extra fillip for running smoothly your blogging habit. 

(Read on …)

Impressed with the PostgreSQL Installer

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:48 am on Monday, April 27, 2009

Until today I had never installed PostgreSQL from the Binary provided at postgresql.org since it’s pretty much always in some form of repository provided by most distributions. Today, for the first time ever I installed it and have to say I’m very impressed with the installer. I some what shuddered as I saw a “install shield” type installer interface, as my past encounters with these have generally tended to not work out so well. What I noticed about the PostgreSQL installer though was different from the “install shield”, it was BitRock. BitRock is a cross platform installer for “Windows, Linux, OS X and more…” as this was my first experience with BitRock with a Linux machine I have to say it was a positive one. It allowed me to install PostgreSQL with some custom components pretty effortlessly. While most won’t need to do a custom installation as PostgreSQL will probably be in a repository, its handy to know that the installer works.

BitRock does not appear to have a completely free license but they do seem to give open source projects a “free copy.” Not sure how I feel about this, but I guess if they’re out to make money then it could work for them. Apparentely it doesn’t take much to please me on a mundane Monday morning, I’d have been perfectly fine with a tarball and manual configuration but the GUI has brightened up my day. Thanks BitRock! Does any one else have any encounters or shocking experience with installers? What about BitRock in general?

Using a custom Tomcat on Fedora

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:22 am on Wednesday, November 12, 2008

So, I hear you need to use Tomcat on Fedora eh? Not happy with the available Tomcat version from the repository? Well my friends you can add a custom Tomcat to Fedora and have it run as a service.

This post is somewhat related to: my Adding a service on Fedora post except this one is more specific to Tomcat. If you’d like more information on adding services to Fedora that is the place to look.

Here is the script that I have been using: (Read on …)

Charting your boot processes with bootchart

Filed under: Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:57 pm on Monday, September 22, 2008

Linux users often like to boast about their awesome bootup times. I thought that there was nothing cooler than getting a wicked fast bootup time, until now. A while back I found this nifty application called bootchart and shoved it in my bookmarks. I was randomly surfing my bookmarks, came across it again and gave it another shot. (Read on …)

A few things you may not know about YUM

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 3:14 pm on Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Yum stands for “YellowDog Updater Modified”

Yum is a standard way to update multiple distributions.

The openSUSE build repository uses the yum updating system

Yum was written in Python.

If you install the yum-utils package you can download yum rpm packages by running:

 yumdownloader --source yum

There are graphical front ends to YUM

Yum is maintained by the Linux@Duke project, thats right the basketball team you love to hate: The Blue Devils.

Using wc and How To Count Table Rows

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:07 pm on Sunday, March 9, 2008

I made this little script to check how many packages were available on the web from the Cygwin Package Repository located at http://www.cygwin.com/packages

Its a one liner but it does its job well.

CYGLIST=$(curl http://www.cygwin.com/packages/ | grep \<tr | grep ball | wc -l); echo $CYGLIST;

All the above is doing is creating a variable called CYGLIST that is the result of grabbing the cygwin.com/packages/ page, grepping all of the TR’s that also have the word “ball” in it (for the image) and then using the wc -l (L) command to count how many results are found. Then the list is echoed out.

wc is a very useful command for printing newline, word and byte counts. This is a good example of how to use wc to count lines in a shell script. wc can also be used to print all of these values in one line of a file.  The syntax is below:

<p align="left">bash-3.1# wc file.txt
9  20 184 file.txt

The above shows the number of lines in the file.txt, it shows how many words are in the file and also how many bytes. In my first example wc uses the -l switch to display the number of lines. This script can also be used with a little bit of bash math to calculate how many items are in an HTML list. I’m working on a script that automatically does this, when its finished I will be sure to post it here on The Linux Blog.

Package management on Slackware

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 6:38 am on Friday, December 21, 2007

People complain that Slackware is hard to use. I don’t believe that thats true. I don’t think that its any harder to use than any other Linux distribution. I also believe that there is perfection in simplicity. Believe me that it isn’t the easiest to set up but once its up it is actually easy to update and maintain once you learn how.

Despite popular believe Slackware does have good package management software. The main ones that come to mind are slapt-get, slackbuilds, pkgtools, swaret and slackpkg. Below is a small amount of information about each of them.

I’ve never myself used swaret so I don’t know too much about it other than its a package manager that manages dependencies. I also know that a new version will be released soon. If your interested in finding the best package management for Slackware you might want to check swaret out.

slapt is a mashup of the two words slack & apt. Those familiar with Debian or Ubuntu will know apt-get is at the heart of these systems, slapt-get is a clone of this system. Its been in Beta since its creation but works perfectly. There are graphical front ends for this software. I personally don’t use it because I can not find a fast repository in my area.

slackbuilds are kind of like the Gentoo package management. They are distributed with the source code on the Slackware DVD. They are basically scripts that help compile the source code. Its pretty easy to use, for more information visit: slackbuilds.org

pkgtools are the base of Slackware package management. Basically it is a suite of utilities that you can use to install, remove and upgrade software. The best source I’ve found for finding extra packages is linuxpackages.net.

My favorite for updating Slackware is slackpkg. It uses pkgtools to install and remove packages. It comes on the Slackware CD’s / DVD’s in the extras folder and is pretty easy to use. Basically you install it, select a mirror from the config file and then run:

slackpkg update

Once its finished doing its thing you can then do:

slackpkg upgrade-all

This will start a fairly lengthy process of downloading and installing all of the new packages. Other options are available such as options to install new packages, remove packages revert to vanilla system and many more. One thing I have to caution on is updating to current. Its not as easy as upgrading from release X to slackware-current all the time. This is due to the different versions of GCC, glib, solibs and various other types of libraries. Always read the UPGRADE.TXT or at least have a back up of all of your critical data before attempting to upgrade.

There are a lot of options, if your interested in running Slackware I suggest you try them all and then use the one you like. If you don’t want to run Slackware because another distribution suits you better try not to use the “I don’t use Slackware because its hard to maintain” card.

Slackware-Current Xfce 4.4.2 Updates

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 1:33 pm on Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Slackware 12 - Current, Firefox, Xfce 4.4.2 Screenshot.I upgraded my Slackware Box to Slackware-Current yesterday and there are many updated packages. Here is the Slackware Current Changelog.

Included is Xfce 4.4.2, this is the newest Xfce and has many bug fixes and a minor security bug fix in terminal. For the entire list you can look at the Xfce – 4.4.2 changelog

Firefox 2.0.0.11 is in this release which is good because sometimes the current repository contains older versions of Firefox.

The screenshot is just a screenshot of the GetFireFox page. Also, you will notice the nice transparencies feature of Xfce. Click it for the larger version.