Linux Blog

Anonymous Browsing with Vatlator

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:17 pm on Saturday, September 25, 2010

Emanuele gave me the heads up of a new release of Vatlator which is a live CD for anonymous browsing. This is the first I’ve heard of Vatlator so naturally I downloaded it to see what it was all about. After setting up a new virtual machine and disk it had no problems booting up and did it fast. From testing Firefox, tor is enabled by default and works well, although a little slower but thats expected from using Tor. You may want to note that that not all traffic is routed through Tor, it would be best test to make sure that what you need is before you need to use it.
I installed the Virtual Box add-ons, and after restarting X by logging out, then logging back in (took me a while to figure this out) the resolution was much better. By the way, the sudo root password is vatlator. Since it is based on Ubuntu installing software works with apt-get and has a great range of packages.

One thing that baffles me is the “F… the censorship” slogan, it just seems a little hypocritical, but I can relate to reasons behind it. I’m definitely going to keep it handy since it runs great in Virtual Box, boots up quickly and performs really well. Kudo’s Emanuele!

General Linux Change Password

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:52 am on Thursday, December 20, 2007

Changing your password under Linux is a pretty simple task providing you know how to do it, and of course since we’re talking about Linux: changing your password is as simple or complicated as you want it to be either way. You either love GUI’s or you hate them, so one method or the other can be confusing. I’m more of a console guy, but I’ll start with the GUI methods because thats probably what I think the masses want to see first. Remember what your doing tho, if you need to change the password on more than one box, I would look into changing your password by command line.

There is more than one reason to change your password, the examples below assume that you are just changing the current users password because it needs to be changed.

kdepasswd

kdepasswd example

passwd

linux change passwd

If you need to change the password for another user, log in as root and execute the following:

passwd (username)

linux change passwd

There are many ways to change your root password if you forgot it.

One way to do it is to boot up with a live CD, mount your hard drive, chroot and then execute the passwd command, once you reboot your password should be reset.