Linux Blog

Mandatory New Years Post

Filed under: The Linux Blog News — TheLinuxBlog.com at 7:37 pm on Monday, January 2, 2012

Happy new year! I guess it’s time for a yearly update, I feel like everyone else has done it and now its my turn. Hit the jump for some more statistics that are probably only interesting to yours truly.

Top 10 Posts
Interestingly enough none of these were written this year. Perhaps I should write a query to extract the most popular ones of this year, I’m not sure they’re getting the same search love as my older stuff.

Using cut, Shellscript string manipulation 8.54%
Handy Linux Wallpaper 7.33%
Shell script to get user input 7.18%
The Linux Blog 6.38%
Rsync to SMB Share 4.26%
Apache director index forbidden by options directive 3.97%
Working with CSV files in bash 3.64%
Rotating videos in Linux 2.46%
Recursive md5 sum script 2.28%
iphone ssh client 2.04%

(Read on …)

Backup Utility Roundtable

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:30 pm on Thursday, September 16, 2010

Did you remember to backup the files…?
All of them?
What do you mean *MOST* of them?
Well, you should have used one of these flippin’ utilities.
Off with his head!
(Read on …)

An rsync primer

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:55 am on Tuesday, January 13, 2009

An rsync Primer

rsync is a great tool used to copy or “sync” files locally or remotely. Having just lost a fair amount of important personal data its good to make the point that you can lose data if you use rsync, so make sure that you know what you are doing works before putting it into production.
“Whats so great about rsync?”
I hear you ask.

Well, there are many ways of copying data around, regular old cp, scp and rcp but what sets rsync apart is that it’s capable of syncing those files that have changed, or those that are missing. In other words, why do a full copy of all files, risking further corruption when only some have changed?
rsync also handles compression and verifies that the files were written correctly.
The syntax for rsync is fairly straightforward, those of you familiar with the rcp or scp should be easily able to relate to that of rsync.

The syntax for a local file copy is:

rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [DEST]

-avz is the option that I use most commonly.

-a for archive, -v for verbose and -z for compression. As lame as it may sound, I actually remember the syntax for this as “Alien Vs. Zeus.” Sounds stupid, but it actually works.

Since I do not normally sync directories locally, one of my hosts is usually remote. rsync is configured to use SSH by default, but rsh can be used if preferred. I stick with the default SSH for simplicity. The syntax is very similar to scp’s

To Pull: rsync [OPTION...] [USER@]HOST:SRC... [DEST]
 
To Push: rsync [OPTION...] SRC... [USER@]HOST:DEST

If you like to back up all files matching a pattern the same syntax applies but you specify a pattern. An example is you could backup all .conf files from /etc (provided you have read access) to another host by doing the following:

rsync /etc/*.conf [USER@]HOST:DEST

If you do the above, I am assuming that you would also want to backup other configuration files within the /etc/ directory. Instinct tells you if you have read the man page to just use -r however you may want to just do a full backup as rsync with a pattern by default does not traverse into directories.

Compression is really a nice feature for transferring large amounts of data. To demonstrate the speed increases that the -z option gives my full /etc/ directory which is 48M. It took 0m12.671s with compression and 0m35.657s without. This was over wireless from a dual core 2GHz laptop to a 1.8GHz wired desktop, so your results may vary. Either way compression or no compression rsync is a handy utility that should be able to make your life of copying files around a little easier.