Linux Blog

Adding a service in Fedora

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:08 pm on Sunday, July 6, 2008

This week on Shell Script Sundays I’ll show you how to add a service to Fedora. This is very useful if you don’t happen to use yum for every service you want to run, and xinetd doesn’t really work for you.

Firstly there are three main parts to a Fedora service script. Start, Stop and Restart. They are pretty much self explanatory, but you don’t have to worry about the restart action since all it does is stop’s and then starts the service.

Without further ado here is the script:

#!/bin/bash
#
# Fedora-Service Update notification daemon
#
# Author:       TheLinuxBlog.com
#
# chkconfig:    1000 50 50
#
# description:  This is a test Fedora Service \
#               Second line of the fedora service template.
# processname:  FedoraTemplate
#
RETVAL=0;

start() {
echo “Starting Fedora-Service”
}

stop() {
echo “Stopping Fedora-Service”
}

restart() {
stop
start
}

case “$1″ in
start)
start
;;
stop)
stop
;;
restart)
restart
;;
*)
echo $”Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart}”
exit 1
esac

exit $RETVAL

Now that you have a template for the script, you will want to modify it for your service. You need to keep the header at the top. This is how the Fedora Knows about your service. The three numbers indicate what order the scripts should start up and shut down in. The first seems to be a identification number and the other two are the startup and shutdown order. These can be adjusted depending on when you want the service to start up.Once you are done modifying the script put the script in /etc/init.d/

To make sure it works you can call it with service using the following actions:

service start
service stop
service restart

If all of the actions work, you are ready to add the service to the system. If you use the setup command as root it seems to do this step for you, but if you just want to add the service quickly without bothering to scramble through configuration menu’s you can do the following:

chkconfig –add <script name>

If you want the service to start automatically at boot up you can use ntsysv. For more information read my post on Managing Services on Fedora

Using BASH to sort a book collection. ISBN Data Mining – Part 1

Filed under: General Linux,Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:47 am on Sunday, September 16, 2007

Many problems can be solved with a little bit of shell scripting.
This week I plan to show you a script that does a little data mining from Barnes and Noble.
I have a lot of books and wanted cataloged information on them. Each book has a unique identifier called an ISBN. So I collected all of my ISBN numbers and a simple loop that wrapped around a script a friend of mine made to find basic information.
Here is his script:

#!/bin/bash
ISBN=”$1″

function fetchInfo () {
### Using barnesandnoble.com to fetch info…
lynx -source “http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?ISBN=${ISBN}” |\
tr -d ‘[:cntrl:]‘ | sed ‘s/>\n

### Parsing book title.
if [ "${lineArray[0]}” == ”
echo “4|Title: ${lineArray[*]}” | sed ‘s/<[^>]*>//g;s/ ([^)]*)//g’### Parsing book author.
elif [ "$(echo ${lineArray[*]} | grep “id=\”contributor\”")” ]; then
echo “3|Author(s): ${lineArray[*]}” | sed ‘s/by //;s/<[^>]*>//g’

### Parsing additional data.
elif [ "${lineArray[0]}” == ”
[ "$(echo ${lineArray[*]} | grep -ve “bullet” -ve “title”)” ]; then
echo “1|${lineArray[*]}” | sed ‘s/<[^>]*>//g;s/:/: /;s/ / /’
fidone | sort -ur | awk -F\| ‘{print $2}’ | grep “:”

}

if [ "${#ISBN}" -ge "10" ]; then
fetchInfo
fi

The script should be called as followed (assuming the script name is eBook.sh):

sh eBook.sh ISBNNUMBER

The first step is to see if the ISBN is greater than 10 characters, if it is it goes to the fetchInfo() function.
It then takes the given ISBN number and searches the barnsandnoble.com site for any matches. To do this lynx is used, the -source option tells lynx to output the source instead of using browsing mode. The output of lynx is piped to tr and sed. tr is used to delete all line breaks from the source, the sed expression adds a line break at the end of each HTML tag. The while loop loops over each line from from the piped lynx, tr and sed.
Within the loop is where anything from the output of the search page can be pulled out. This script pulls out the book title, the author and additional data.

I formatted my ISBN’s in a text list and used the following loop to fetch information on my books and save them with the ISBN as the file name.

for i in $(cat list.txt); do sh eBook.sh $i > $i.txt; done;

In the next issue I plan to expand on this to format data in an even more presentable manor.
Used applications
tr, lynx, sed, awk, sort, grep