Linux Blog

Important Linux Distros for Beginners in 2012

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:34 pm on Tuesday, May 1, 2012

This is a guest post from Brianne.

There is wide variety of Linux Distros in the market. Each one differs in size, design, support and layout, although the basic function is the same. Each distros offers several unique features apart from main features. There is a heavy competition among distributors to create and develop unique features. Each of these distros offers different types of support systems such as forums, live chat, and other means. That is why it is necessary to select the distributor based on your requirement.

Here is a list of Important Linux distributors for beginners in 2012.

(Read on …)

Check if SELinux is Enabled

Filed under: Shell Script Sundays — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:41 am on Monday, December 8, 2008

This weeks (now late) Shell Script Sundays (posted on Monday) article is a short one on a check to see if SELinux is enabled. While SELinux has some great security enhancements it can present a number of problems in applications and shell scripts alike. There is a simple utility that comes with many Linux distributions called “selinuxenabled”

selinuxenabled exits with a status of 1 if it is not enabled and 0 if it is. Zero normally means false but in this case since it is an exit status it is an exception. So, if you need to do a quick check, you may just run selinuxenabled. You will quickly find that it returns nothing. To figure out the exit status for your quick check, put an ampersand (&) at the end, and it will tell you the exit status. eg:

[root@thelinuxblog.com ~]# selinuxenabled &
[1] 28417
[1]+  Exit 1                  selinuxenabled

As we can see from the example above SELinux is disabled.

To use selinuxenabled in your scripts you would use it like any other command. Refer to Shell Scripting 101 for some more information. selinuxenabled can also be used in your scripts to make sure that selinux is enabled, which can be useful if you are trying to do security audits across multiple machines.

Managing Services on Fedora

Filed under: Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:01 am on Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Fedora is a great desktop system, it has a pretty good services manager called service. It can be used to turn on, off and restart most services that run on the system. Should you want to manage running services all you have to do is type:

service[service name] [stop | start | restart]

If you don’t know the service name it can normally be found by issuing the –status-all switch. Doing so will output a long list of services so you may want to grep it or use a pager such as less:

 [root@linux-blog ~]# service --status-all | less
 
[root@linux-blog ~]# service --status-all | grep snmp
capi not installed - No such file or directory (2)
JAVA_EXECUTABLE or HSQLDB_JAR_PATH in '/etc/sysconfig/hsqldb' is set to a non-file.
snmpd is stopped
snmptrapd is stopped

While service is a great utility to manage services it does not stop them from running at startup. To manage services that start up when you boot you can use a handy little dialog script called “ntsysv”:

[root@linux-blog ~]# ntsysv

This will give you a nice dialog which is intuitive and similar to those of text based installers. Select the services you want to start up and then tab over to OK. I turn a lot of services off that I don’t use, if you’re unsure of what you need, try stopping it with the services command first and see if anything breaks. If after test it works well just turn it off.

Since I don’t use SELinux on my development machine, I always turn off setroubleshootd. I used ntsysv to stop it from starting at bootup and if I need it I can use the service command to start it.

Here is a screenshot of ntsysv in action:

managing services with ntsysv on Fedora