Linux Blog

Using Subversion with SSH & Custom Ports

Filed under: Linux Software,Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 9:09 am on Monday, September 15, 2008

Lets say you use subversion on your home PC to keep track of projects and you want to checkout or export your project from a remote location. Here’s the catch, sshd is running on a custom port or forwarded from another. For some reason the command line SVN client does not support a port parameter when using the defacto svn+ssh://

svn co svn+ssh://thelinuxblog.com/owen/svn/project1/trunk project1
ssh: connect to host thelinuxblog.com port 22: Connection refused

Well we know why the error above happens its because I happen to run SSH on port 1337. The following work around requires root privileges, and may mess with your system a bit but if you really need to check something out, then it will work.

As root, login and stop SSH if you run it. With SSH Forward port 22 with a local SSH forwarding connection to the remote host.

[owen@thelinuxblog.com]$ sudo su -
[root@thelinuxblog.com]$ /sbin/service sshd stop
[root@thelinuxblog.com]$ ssh -p 1337 owen@thelinuxblog.com-L 22:<internal ip>:1337

Once this is done, your localhost:22 now forwards to your remote host. With another session (on your local machine) you can verify the connection by using ssh localhost. You will probably get warnings about the hosts identity being changed, or not verifying it, but you can ignore then. Once you’ve tested it, just use SVN as normal. When finished, remember to logout of the SSH session, and start SSH back up again if you run it.

My Mind Stomps with OpenStomp.

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 4:21 pm on Tuesday, August 26, 2008

I’m always looking for ways to integrate Linux into my life more, and harness technology. As a mediocre guitar player and Professional Linux Geek I’ve often thought about Linux and guitar effects. Sure, there is a ton of software and homebrew hardware out there, but I’d like something more than that.

I’m sure by now (since its all over the news) that you’ve probably heard about the OpenStomp. Awesome concept! Lets make something quite complex to build, lets not give out the actual details about the internals of the device and lets claim to be the “Worlds first Open Source Effects Pedal”.

I was considering purchasing one of these until I found out the price. Then I thought, oh. I’ll purchase a parts kit. NO kit available. Then I though, oh I’ll just build one from scratch. HOW, with no public schematics?

Sorry my friends, having a website, a hardware device and a forum that you publish your source code to will not get me to purchase your device. Charging $349 for the pedal that you don’t provide plans for doesn’t go down well. If my commercial “closed box” gets fried, I don’t couldn’t care because it was cheap. The Open Stomp is a different story, What kind of Warranty do you offer?
I know you offer schematics if I purchase it, but what happens if it breaks with no modification in the first day?

What happens if a software update blows my StompBox up? You only have one OS listed on your forums page, are you going to post each version there? Do you have a public subversion repository? Come on StompBox, get your act together and post it on source forge before some one else does. Also while your at it post your schematics so that people can look at them and justify spending the $349 instead of building it. Give them away to capable developers that are interested in your product, you know the ones that will make your product popular by enhancing it.

If you are wondering, this being The Linux Blog and all, if I’m throwing a hissy because there is no Linux version available I’m not.  I couldn’t care less. There are ways around that and if it gets popular enough, there will be a version available. What I’m sour about is the fact that there is nothing “Open Source” about the OpenStomp, other than the huge lack of good documentation, and some source code that is posted in the forum.

I think I’ll go look at the old schematics for some “stomp boxes” and see about building them. Apparently this isn’t open since there is no source code involved. Jeez

The Open Source Community – Please wait a while…

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:12 am on Thursday, July 24, 2008

Netbeans, Please wait a whileYou have to admire the open source community. With such a diverse group of people all kinds of things can happen. One thing that cracked me up today was the language used in the NetBeans project (see image.)

I’m a big fan of the project don’t get me wrong, I just thought it was funny. I actually have a personal encounter with something similar when I was the developing a project. I was coding some error handling procedures on a website where all invalid input (temporarily) got directed to an obnoxious error page that read “Error!” with a bright yellow background and black text. When a end user accidentally typed a url in wrong it created the error. Since this website was for a bunch of writers they didn’t like this too much, so they picked on me until it was fixed.

This is part of the problem with the open source community. When an application is created often not enough thought is put into the interface and terminology used or the thought process of the low tech end user. It is different when a company develops an application because they can spend money on designers, interface experts and writers. In the open source community there is a lack of resources and collaboration to make this happen.

Even with well established organizations like Tigris (subversion) cryptic messages that appear in certain products can be difficult to decipher for problems as simple as permissions issues.

I don’t think it is a good idea for every one to “wait a while” to solve this problem because its not going to fix its self. So in closing I propose the question:

“what can the open source community do to solve this problem?”

Please discus.