Linux Blog

A Bug Hunter’s Diary Review

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:27 pm on Monday, May 21, 2012

A Bug Hunter’s Diary, by Tobias Klein, from No Starch Press is a book that caught my eye. Reverse engineering is a topic I have an interest in, if not much experience, but I am not quite ready for a comprehensive book on the topic. A Bug Hunter’s Diary seemed like a good match for my interests but, initially, I wasn’t sure what to expect from it.

To my pleasant surprise, I walked away with a lot of fantastic technical information; much more than I expected from a technical book that read like a story. A Bug Hunter’s Diary gives great insight into the bug hunting process. It outlines various techniques used to find bugs, and then moves on to exploitation and outlines some of the remediation techniques and processes. For each bug, a chapter is presented with necessary background information, plenty of technical information and code, a detailed explanation, and a timeline outlining the process.

Tobias Klein did a great job explaining what was being done and why, even for those (like me) who know very little about assembly language. Unfortunately, due to the laws of the country in which the author lives, A Bug Hunter’s Diary doesn’t show working exploits but he does provide links to demonstration videos online throughout.

I initially read this book on the Kindle before a hard copy arrived. It reads very well on the Kindle, with the exception of a few tables. A short and delightful read, I devoured A Bug Hunter’s Diary cover to cover in record time. Once I started reading, I would find it hard to put down. For me it was a great book that has re-ignited my interests, motivating me to learn more, and I look forward to reading it again.

Auto mounting a partition

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:03 pm on Monday, March 26, 2012

It’s been a while. A while since I’ve had to actually had to manually edit the /etc/fstab to automount a partition. So long, that I searched my blog trying to find out how to do it. To my surprise, I’d never actually written one. If I had, I couldn’t find it. Here’s to you, memory:

According to /etc/fstab this is how it’s done

# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>

For those of us that are human, that can mean very little. What you can do, in hopefully slightly more understandable terms is add a line that looks like this:

/dev/sd[a|b|c][x] /mnt/[location] [filesystem] defaults 0 0

What that looks like in my case is:

/dev/sda5 /mnt/sda5 ext4 defaults 0 0

Save, exit and reboot. Hope for the best :)

Disclaimer – I did manage to find the man page for fstab while searching!

Ubuntu Unleashed 2010 Edition Review

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 11:36 am on Monday, January 25, 2010

Irritated with my Desktop after an upgrade gone bad and an incident with the nvidia noveau driver that left me x less, I decided it was time to re-install. I turned to my bookshelf to find Ubuntu Unleashed 2010 Edition. Normally by the time a book hits my shelf the material is outdated, not necessarily useless, just not the most up to date. This is an exception. The Ubuntu Unleashed 2010 Edition was updated with an Ubuntu 9.10 DVD and a “Free Upgrade to Ubuntu 10.04″ which I found out that if you buy the book before the end of 2010 you can get an upgrade kit in the mail.

So, I pop the DVD in the drive and start the installation. Nothing new here for anyone that has installed Linux or Ubuntu recently; for those that haven’t, it was a pleasant surprise to see that it actually detected my high resolution monitor and used it to its advantage. It really is strange to not have to squint at an installer. The first chapter covers the step by step installation in more detail which is relatively short and easy to follow. Most people should not need to read this if they are familiar with installing an operating system but it I think it is good to have it there. Just don’t let this first chapter prevent you from looking further into this book. After putting the DVD in and getting it started, I found myself reading the book through the entire installation; which for some reason got from 0-90% quickly, then took the majority of the time in the 90% range, but I’m not complaining.

The Authors really did a good job of writing in an understandable language and organizing the book in a logical format. I’ve found myself flipping through and finding many golden nuggets of information. I personally would not have picked this book up because of the title, since I’m not a big Ubuntu user. But Ubuntu Unleashed 2010 edition is packed full of information, 32 chapters and a hefty appendix to be exact. It is not all Ubuntu – specific either, meaning most of the content should work on just about distribution. This book would not be rendered useless if you don’t decide to go the Ubuntu route. I recommend taking a look at the contents and buying this book, as I’m sure you’ll be pleasantly surprised at the topics it covers. I think it would be a great book for someone that is interested in Linux in general, it reads well but can also be used as a quick reference. I wish I had a book like this when I was getting started, it would have saved me a whole lot of time and effort. I have set aside some of the more advanced chapters and made a note to read later.

Other reviews I’ve read have said that it has too much terminal use in it, which is something Ubuntu is trying to eliminate. While this may be true, if you want the most out of your Linux distribution, the fact is you will at some point use a terminal. Commands are less likely to change as much as graphical interfaces. Although some things may be slightly outdated I don’t think that this book should be re-written, as it is in the nature of open source and technology to change. If you keep this in mind I don’t think you’ll be disappointed with it.



Bin and Cue Support for Linux

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 2:35 pm on Tuesday, March 18, 2008

If you have a bin/cue image that you need to use under Linux you may be in for a surprise. I recently downloaded a copy of a game that I owned but was too scratched to use. The problem was the game came in bin / cue format. To fix this I just used a nifty little program called bchunk and converted it to ISO. It can be found here: http://he.fi/bchunk/

I would really like to find a way to mount bin and cue images under Linux but so far I’m not having any luck. I’m wondering if with some modification the bchunk program could be used with fuse.

KDE 4.0 on Slackware 12

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:34 am on Friday, January 18, 2008

It hasn’t been that long since the new KDE 4.0 has been released. To My surprise there is currently no working version of this available for Slackware 12. I have been searching around but haven’t been able to find any evidence of it working yet. In this case I’m going to try and get it working just to see if I can. In the mean time I may start up a new virtual machine and set up the Kubuntu live CD and maybe the Hardy Heron when it comes out. I’ve been watching the podcasts on You Tube but have mixed feelings about the new features, so I figure I’ll try it out myself rather than relying on other peoples opinions and videos. I suggest every one do the same thing.

I know this is old but it is one of the videos from the KDE commit digest. The containment feature seems like a pretty neat feature. What do you think?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGYGzTDHhPg