Linux Blog

Quick TOR Guide

Filed under: Quick Linux Tutorials — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:30 pm on Wednesday, June 15, 2011

tor guide
Accredited online
colleges have web development classes
for those who want to learn more.

TOR is a nice little network service application that lets you do things over the Internet more anonymously. I’ve always been fascinated by it but never really used it. I always assumed it was hard, but getting set up to use tor doesn’t have to be hard. If you want a virtual machine that is configured to browse anonymously, check out Vatlator.

Tor comes with most distributions these days, in Fedora and Ubuntu you can just install Vidalia. Once installed open Firefox (if thats what you use) and install TorButton from the Add-ons. Fire up Vidalia from Menu->Internet->Vidalia (Gnome), wait for a connection and then toggle the Tor Status in FireFox.

To verify you are connected to the Tor network, goto check.torproject.org

Thats it, its a simple as that!

Anonymous Browsing with Vatlator

Filed under: General Linux,Linux Software — TheLinuxBlog.com at 12:17 pm on Saturday, September 25, 2010

Emanuele gave me the heads up of a new release of Vatlator which is a live CD for anonymous browsing. This is the first I’ve heard of Vatlator so naturally I downloaded it to see what it was all about. After setting up a new virtual machine and disk it had no problems booting up and did it fast. From testing Firefox, tor is enabled by default and works well, although a little slower but thats expected from using Tor. You may want to note that that not all traffic is routed through Tor, it would be best test to make sure that what you need is before you need to use it.
I installed the Virtual Box add-ons, and after restarting X by logging out, then logging back in (took me a while to figure this out) the resolution was much better. By the way, the sudo root password is vatlator. Since it is based on Ubuntu installing software works with apt-get and has a great range of packages.

One thing that baffles me is the “F… the censorship” slogan, it just seems a little hypocritical, but I can relate to reasons behind it. I’m definitely going to keep it handy since it runs great in Virtual Box, boots up quickly and performs really well. Kudo’s Emanuele!