Linux Blog

Tether iPhone through the cable, on Linux

Filed under: General Linux — TheLinuxBlog.com at 10:02 am on Thursday, August 20, 2009

So you got an iPhone huh? perhaps you’ve got an SSH client and maybe you jailbroke your iPhone and have done some iPhone wifi tethering (That’s not the best way, and not free), but have you been able to use SSH through the cable? Me neither until a little while ago.

The benefits of connecting by the cable are slightly obvious to anyone who wants to do it:

BATTERY!
With your phone plugged in, you’ll get better battery life, or perhaps just prevent the battery from getting discharged any further.

No Wifi Setup
This was really the biggest problem for me, having to reconfigure wifi on my laptop then getting the laptop and phone to talk. Some times wireless connections mysteriously dropped or just acted plain funky. Any one who’s ever typed in a WEP key on the iPhone also knows what a pain it is, so not having to use Wifi is a plus.

Privacy
Since the cable is used, there should be no wireless network for others to fool around with.

Data Transfer Rates
I have not yet confirmed this, mostly because I’m lazy, partly because I don’t have the time to produce any stats but, 480Mbps with USB2.0 Vs. a theoretical 54Mbps on 802.11G

Enough already, how do I do it?
Thanks to Jing Su there is a LGPL’d piece of software called itunnel that can be found here. Installing itunnel will vary by distribution. It’s fairly straight forward on Fedora, provided you have the library libiphone installed you should be able to download, untar, make, and run.

Once you’ve installed itunnel, you run it by using:

sudo itunnel [port]

If you don’t specify a port it listens on port 3023.

Connect to localhost using your normal SSH Socks proxy method -D <port> and your username, default being mobile with your new port.

 ssh -D [yourport] -p 3023 mobile@localhost

Type “Yes” to accept the fingerprint (you may need to eventually change your fingerprint when you upgrade your phone) and then type in your password which should NOT be “alpine”, because you did change it right?

Once you’re SSH’d in, you can set up your browser to use the socks proxy as you would with Wifi tether version on the port you specified with -D.

There you have it, a way to Tether your iPhone through the cable on Linux! Rumor, (well not really a rumor, since I’ve used itunnel.exe) has it that this also works with a Windows box, just try to find a non-virus infected version of the iTunnel suite.

Happy Hacking!

Become independent of the system tray using conky.

Filed under: General Linux,The Linux Blog News — Kaleb at 9:19 pm on Thursday, February 7, 2008

Hello everybody it is I Kaleb from over at http://kpstuff.servebeer.com again come to talk today about an app that I have been using for a while but just recently decided to make it fix my dependence of the system tray all together.

If you read my blog regularly you would know that I am not a fan of GUI applications, I use as few of them as possible. I prefer to use command line programs instead for many reasons: one they are faster, two they are easier and quicker to use/access the features that I want from them, and three I just like the way they look.

For a long time I have used the Fluxbox window manager because it is small lightweight and over all pretty. But no matter what window manager I use: Gnome, KDE, Xfce, FluxBox or OpenBox I have always had some dependence on the system tray, which annoyed me a lot.

Some of them things that I liked a system tray for were a static clock that was always in the same spot and I could always look down and see it, also it had a few nice little icons over there for me to use at my will, like for instance, Gmail-Notify which is a little systray applet that will tell you if you have gmail or not and give you a little pop-up if you get new mail. Also this was for a while how i was telling if I had a new message in pidgin.

Then I started thinking to myself,

“All of these things could be done with Conky and I could use Conky for even more.”

So began the transformation.

If you don’t know already what Conky is, it is a little application that will put text in any format and of almost any type of data you want, weather it be the weather report for the day or the week, or your battery status, the day of the week, or your wireless link quality. It blends into your desktop very well and will give you that sweet geekish look that everybody looks for in a desktop.

First we need to install it.

Gentoo:

emerge -av conky

Make sure that you check out the use flags in Gentoo for things like “wifi” and others

Arch Linux:

pacman -S conky

Ubuntu:

apt-get install conky

Now that you have Conky installed it is time for you to figure out where on your screen you want to put it and also how you want it to look. I wont get into to much detail about how to set it up because those things can be figured out by the most green of Linux users. Also there should be an example config file for Conky that came with the install for Gentoo it is /etc/conky/conky.conf. You need to copy this file to ~/.conkyrc and then edit it at your leisure.

It is quite simple to figure out first you decided the main variables for the program then after the word TEXT you decide how your Conky will look on your desktop. What “text” you would like to see and in what fashion. It is here where you will replace your systray.The first thing I wanted my replacement system tray to display was my gmail messages, weather I had emails or not and how many. So I put together a little script that you can obtain from http://kpstuff.servebeer.com/~admin/check_gmail.sh in order to use this script you need to download it. I suggest to put it into a folder such as ~/scripts/ also make it executable with either “chmod 755 check_gmail.sh” or “chmod +x check_gmail.sh” and remember to edit check_gmail.sh for your username and password. Then you need to edit your ~/.conkyrc file under the TEXT area to resemble this

${texeci 60 ~/scripts/check_gmail.sh}

After this I wanted a clock obviously. Now the time variable has almost a million different options for the format that it gives so I will give you an example of how to set it up but you should run “man strftime” to see a full list of formatting options.

${time %I:%M%p}

This will put a time format on your Conky that resembles “02:19PM”

Yes that is right it is that easy and you can almost print anything you want on Conky even RSS feeds, I suggest you try it out at least once, but not just a little install it and run it and it doesn’t work try.

There are literally hundreds of variables that can be used in Conky and those that are not variables can be created using shell/perl/php/and ruby scripts.

For a list of variables go to http://conky.sourceforge.net/config_settings.html and http://conky.sourceforge.net/variables.html

Thank you once more for your time and remember to leave comments for any of the writers for the Linux blog because each of us would sure appreciate feedback on our writings, whether it be good or bad.